15

The Queen of England is greater than me in that she is my Queen and I am her loyal subject.. but we are equal in that we are both human. My father is greater than me in that he is my father, but we are equal in nature, in that we are both human. The Son of God is, and always has been from eternity, subordinate to the Father in his role as the Son. This ...


12

No problem for Trinitarians at all. The context of 1 Corinthians 15:27 is actually a big problem for Unitarians. 1 Corinthians 15:27-28 [27]For he hath put all things under his feet. But when he saith all things are put under him, it is manifest that he is excepted, which did put all things under him. [28]And when all things shall be subdued unto ...


10

If you read the general context of this passage in Corinthians you will find that there is a lot of stuff about church order, roles in the church, how to deal with problems inside and outside the body of believers, etc. The verse you quote in particular starts to make sense when you see it as a reference to church discipline and understand the purpose of ...


10

According to The New Evidence That Demands a Verdict by Josh McDowell, p125, Josephus, who died after 100AD, wrote of Jesus in his Jewish Antiquities, "...for he appeared to them alive again the third day; as the divine prophets had foretold these and then thousand other wonderful things concerning him." (Antiquities, XVIII, 33). However, those words are ...


10

Read the whole chapter. Earlier in 1st Corinthians 15 the Bible's definitive answer to this question is given. For I delivered to you as of first importance what I also received: that Christ died for our sins in accordance with the Scriptures, that he was buried, that he was raised on the third day in accordance with the Scriptures, and that he appeared ...


9

This article provides a good summary of the historical and current practices within Christianity regarding head coverings. Basically for large portions of Christianity wearing some kind of head covering before the 20th century was the norm, even for Protestants: Among the Protestant reformers, Martin Luther's wife, Katherine, wore a headcovering in ...


9

In general, Christian teaching, as well as a scholarly understanding, attempts to read intended meaning, rather than the exclusively literal meaning. The author, Paul in this case, doesn't intend to discount the sinfulness of known-sinful actions by their omission from this particular list, which serves one or both of two main purposes: For clarification ...


9

As a "Pharisee amongst Pharisees," Paul would have seen the Scriptures as the Scriptures of the Jews - the Torah, the Ketu'vim, and the Nevi'im, or as we say in English, the Law, the Writings, and the Prophets. When Jesus was on the transfiguration mount, he prefigured this. These Scriptures are the Old Testament to modern Christians, or "the Hebrew Bible" ...


9

Even if the premise that Christ had longer hair is true, it would not matter as that is not the point of this passage. If it is read in context i.e. read the chapter before and after, it is clear that Paul is talking about how Jewish customs and how even though they are no longer necessary due to Christ's sacrifice, they should still be observed if you are ...


9

Since Paul didn't expand on this, the best we can do is to review what noted theologians have said about this. To get some good answers, you really need to look no further than Bible commentaries. Bear in mind that the type of love here is agape love, which is also translated as charity, or selfless love. It's not speaking of romantic love as on "love ...


9

Actually, in his magnum opus "Institutes of the Christian Religion" (ICR), he cited Tobit, Baruch, 1 and 2 Maccabees, and Siriach. The Geneva Bible, which Calvin accepted and fostered, also contains the Deuterocanonical books. This doesn't say however that Calvin accepted them as having the same rank as others books. In fact, he wrote precisely ...


8

It's clear from your question that you are assuming "the prize" to be salvation, and that you believe that this verse speaks of our works earning our salvation, or at least our bad works possibly leading to the loss of our salvation. However, to most reformed theologians, this is not the case. A deeper study of the original Greek, as well as application of ...


7

One of the things it is important to realize about the Bible is that the authors did not sit down to 'write the Bible'. Books of the Bible have to be taken first as what they were intended by their authors to be - a biography of Jesus, a history of the early church, or a letter to one of the churches. Yes, God did inspire those authors to write something ...


7

Both "Pulpit Commentary" and "Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible" recognize this quote as taken from Genesis 2:7, not word by word but carrying the same meaning. Then the LORD God formed the man from the dust of the ground. He breathed the breath of life into the man's nostrils, and the man became a living person. (Genesis 2:7, NLT) The "Last Adam"...


7

The phrase is a direct quotation from Genesis 2.7. There is some difference in the wording in most modern bibles. This is because Paul was quoting from the Greek text of the Old Testament, known as the Septuagint or LXX, whereas our modern bibles are translated from the Hebrew text from which the Greek was originally translated. The LXX text of Genesis 2.7: ...


7

From Barnes' Notes on the Bible: The more obvious signification is, that there is a sense in which it may be said that the cup is blessed, and that by prayer and praise it is set apart and rendered in some sense sacred to the purposes of religion. it cannot mean that the cup has undergone any physical change, or that the wine is anything but wine; ...


7

The First Epistle to the Corinthians opens with an expanded address (1 Corinthians 1:1-7), identifying its writer as the apostle Paul who, with Sosthenes, was writing to the church community in Corinth. After a warm opening address, Paul urges the Corinthians to agree in what they say, and to be united in the same mind and in the same purpose. The reason for ...


7

You ask how is 1 Corinthians 8:6 yet for us there is one God, the Father, of whom are all things, and we for Him; and one Lord Jesus Christ, through whom are all things, and through whom we live. to be understood with Trinitarian theology? In particular, you state "Paul is saying that the one being of God is shared only by the Father." Trinitarians have ...


6

Being as there is no image of Jesus that has any historical credibility, the question is based on a faulty premise. We simply do not know what Jesus' hair looked like. The paintings to which you allude tend to be those painted by the European masters in the 16th & 17th Centuries. At the time, it was fashionable for men to have longer hair, and thus it ...


6

The preceding verses answers your question: 6 Your glorying is not good. Know ye not that a little leaven leaveneth the whole lump? 7Purge out therefore the old leaven, that ye may be a new lump, as ye are unleavened. For even Christ our passover is sacrificed for us: 8Therefore let us keep the feast, not with old leaven, neither with the leaven of malice ...


6

The simplest way to reconcile these passages is to dispute the KJV's translation of βραχύ as "a little." This is, in fact, what most other translations have done, including those that have no interest in internal harmonization. The NET renders Heb 2:7 as follows: Hebrews 2:6–8a (NET) 6 Instead someone testified somewhere: "What is man that ...


6

Since the question does not specify a denomination, I am assuming that any denomination is OK. I thus am basing my answers with one of the clearest doctrinal statements I could find. However, it is pretty representative of most arguments that argue against obligatory head coverings, coming from a variety of theologies. Here is a statement by the Reformed ...


6

The bread and wine we offer at Mass do become, in Catholic understanding, "truly, really, and substantially, the body and blood together with the soul and divinity of our Lord Jesus Christ"1, and this is what we consume in the Eucharist. However, this does not mean—as I mentioned in this answer—that the sacrificial offerings are no longer like ...


6

Evangelical commentators generally hold that Paul is speaking authoritatively in 1 Corinthians 7:12, and only indicating that he was not aware of any direct teaching on this subject by Jesus during his earthly ministry. The Reformation Study Bible explains: With regard to the problem treated in vv. 10, 11, there was a well-known instruction given by Jesus ...


6

The short answer: revelation to Joseph Smith. The long answer: The LDS edition of the King James Version (KJV plus references) was authored in 1979 under the direction of the Apostles: In 1979 and 1981, following a historic effort led by Elders Thomas S. Monson, Boyd K. Packer, and Bruce R. McConkie of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles, The Church of Jesus ...


5

1 Corinthians 13 is one of those chapters that tends to be read at weddings and get taken out of context. Because of its association with weddings, many associate it with romantic love, and David Stratton is right to say clearly that this is not what Paul was thinking about. If you look at chapter 12, you'll see that Paul was addressing the issue of the ...


4

Using the basic rules that Biblical Literalists use when determining what is to be taken as "literally the Word of God", we find the basic principle: When the plain sense of Scripture makes common sense,seek no other sense; Therefore, take every word at its primary, ordinary, usual, literal meaning unless the facts of the immediate context, ...


4

Paul is not trying to make the point that 1 Corinthians 7:12ff is his opinion where the rest is God's inspired Word. Rather, Paul knows the oral tradition of Jesus’ sayings on divorce that were later written down in the Gospels, but he is not aware of a time when Jesus ever spoke specifically to a situation in which one spouse becomes a Christian and the ...


4

1 Corinthians 1:10-14, 16-18 NET I urge you, brothers and sisters, by the name of our Lord Jesus Christ, to agree together, to end your divisions, and to be united by the same mind and purpose. For members of Chloe’s household have made it clear to me, my brothers and sisters, that there are quarrels among you. Now I mean this, that each of you is saying, “I ...


4

John Gills exposition of the Bible always explained it the best for me: The bread and cup are called the bread and cup of the Lord; these may be eaten and drank "unworthily", when they are eaten and drank by unworthy persons, in an unworthy manner, and to unworthy ends and purposes. The Lord's supper may be taken unworthily, when it is partook of ...


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