18 votes
Accepted

Is 1 Corinthians 15:27 problematic for trinitarians?

The Queen of England is greater than me in that she is my Queen and I am her loyal subject.. but we are equal in that we are both human. My father is greater than me in that he is my father, but we ...
17 votes

Is 1 Corinthians 15:28 disregarded by trinitarians?

That the Son (in regard to his Deity) should have a relationship with his Father, which is a matter of filial and voluntary subjection, does not mean that he is not equal in Deity to the Father. Equal ...
  • 19.8k
13 votes

Is 1 Corinthians 15:27 problematic for trinitarians?

No problem for Trinitarians at all. The context of 1 Corinthians 15:27 is actually a big problem for Unitarians. 1 Corinthians 15:27-28 [27]For he hath put all things under his feet. But when ...
  • 6,313
10 votes
Accepted

How many people saw Christ Jesus rise from the dead?

Read the whole chapter. Earlier in 1st Corinthians 15 the Bible's definitive answer to this question is given. For I delivered to you as of first importance what I also received: that Christ died ...
  • 37.1k
10 votes
Accepted

How do denominations which do not believe in transubstantiation, view 1 Cor 10 : 16-17?

A definition of transubstantiation in a Reformed Protestant book is: "Change undergone by the physical elements of the Eucharist, according to Roman Catholic teaching. The bread and wine, in ...
  • 19.5k
9 votes
Accepted

How do Calvinists explain Calvin's use of Baruch?

Actually, in his magnum opus "Institutes of the Christian Religion" (ICR), he cited Tobit, Baruch, 1 and 2 Maccabees, and Siriach. The Geneva Bible, which Calvin accepted and fostered, also ...
  • 4,521
8 votes

How do denominations which do not believe in transubstantiation, view 1 Cor 10 : 16-17?

Actually, Paul refers to Christians as bread, the one loaf. It is a metaphor. For we being many are one bread, and one body: for we are all partakers of that one bread. 1 Cor 10:17 I highly doubt ...
  • 11.5k
7 votes
Accepted

How do evangelicals interpret 1 Corinthians 10:16?

From Barnes' Notes on the Bible: The more obvious signification is, that there is a sense in which it may be said that the cup is blessed, and that by prayer and praise it is set apart and ...
7 votes
Accepted

Why did Paul Thank God he didn't baptize some individuals?

The First Epistle to the Corinthians opens with an expanded address (1 Corinthians 1:1-7), identifying its writer as the apostle Paul who, with Sosthenes, was writing to the church community in ...
7 votes
Accepted

Does 1 Corinthians 8:6 prove Unitarianism?

You ask how is 1 Corinthians 8:6 yet for us there is one God, the Father, of whom are all things, and we for Him; and one Lord Jesus Christ, through whom are all things, and through whom we live. ...
  • 3,558
6 votes
Accepted

We will judge angels? But we are lower than the angels

The simplest way to reconcile these passages is to dispute the KJV's translation of βραχύ as "a little." This is, in fact, what most other translations have done, including those that have no interest ...
  • 396
6 votes

What is the modern argument against obligatory head coverings?

Since the question does not specify a denomination, I am assuming that any denomination is OK. I thus am basing my answers with one of the clearest doctrinal statements I could find. However, it is ...
  • 7,736
6 votes
Accepted

How do Catholics explain 1 Corinthians 11:21 in light of Transubstantiation?

The bread and wine we offer at Mass do become, in Catholic understanding, "truly, really, and substantially, the body and blood together with the soul and divinity of our Lord Jesus Christ"1, and this ...
  • 18.3k
6 votes

How do Evangelicals explain when Paul writes "I, not the Lord"?

Evangelical commentators generally hold that Paul is speaking authoritatively in 1 Corinthians 7:12, and only indicating that he was not aware of any direct teaching on this subject by Jesus during ...
6 votes
Accepted

Where does the LDS section heading for 1 Corinthians 7 come from?

The short answer: revelation to Joseph Smith. The long answer: The LDS edition of the King James Version (KJV plus references) was authored in 1979 under the direction of the Apostles: In 1979 and ...
  • 2,655
5 votes
Accepted

How do people who hold salvation as a one time event respond to passages of "being saved"?

Allow me to refer to John Stott - 'Why I Am a Christian,' (IVP, 2003) p. 87 (a riposte to Bertrand Russell's earlier work, 'Why I Am Not a Christian.') I have been saved – in the past – from the ...
  • 25.4k
4 votes

What does Paul mean by "Love believes all things?"

Anthony Thiselton, in his NIGTC commentary, has offered the following translation of 1 Cor 13:7: It never tires of support, never loses faith, never exhausts hope, never gives up. Here, the phrase ...
  • 4,292
4 votes

How do Catholics and Eastern Orthodox justify their clergy praying with those big hats on their heads?

Orthodox bishops, priests and monks always remove their hats (of whatever kind) when praying. The Bishop removes his mitre at the Altar. Monks hang their klobuk over their shoulder or remove it ...
4 votes

How can 1 Corithians 7:14 and Luke 14:27 be reconciled?

You missed an essential part of the scripture in 1 Corinthians, I feel. The full scripture in KJV reads: 14 For the unbelieving husband is sanctified by the wife, and the unbelieving wife is ...
  • 4,949
4 votes

In 1 Corinthians 8:5, what do the "many gods and many lords" refer to?

There are actually two similar ways that this passage is interpreted: That the "gods" and "lords" are the completely imaginary gods of the heathen That the "gods" and "lords" are supernatural beings ...
4 votes

When did Judas Iscariot kill himself?

Matthew 27:3 says that the impetus for Judas' suicide was seeing him be condemned, rather than seeing him being executed or anything else. Jesus' interactions with Pilate, including the possibility of ...
  • 18.7k
4 votes

What is the case that 1 Corinthians 15:7 refers to James the Just, relative of Jesus, rather than James, one of the Twelve?

It seems more likely that Paul was referring to James the Just (Christ's familial "brother" or possibly a "brother" in name only), but we have no definitive way of knowing this. Some considerations: ...
  • 336
4 votes

Why did Paul Thank God he didn't baptize some individuals?

The church of Corinth had a problem: it was split up into quarrelling factions. The people were more focused on the differences between them, such as which apostles they identified with, than the ...
  • 18.7k
4 votes
Accepted

Who was house of Chloe?

Looking through several Bible commentaries, it looks like not a lot known definitively about Chloe. While some have speculated that Chloe refers to a place, most commentators are reasonably sure that ...
  • 6,237
4 votes

What is the biblical defence used by Anglicans to appoint female vicars/bishops?

Ordination of women in the Anglican Communion (Wikipedia) The Anglican church has different ordination guidelines in different countries, and often the parishes are allowed to make the decision for ...
4 votes
Accepted

How can 1 Corinthians 15:3 be reconciled with Calvinism and limited atonement?

I've looked in numerous systematic theologies and books on evangelism written by Calvinists, and none of them address this particular issue, even though they address many other challenging verses ...
4 votes

Pascal's wager vs 1 Corinthians 15:17-19

Pascal's wager looked at the consequences of belief in God versus unbelief against the possibilities of God versus no God. In 1 Cor. 15 Paul dealt with Greek philosophy that looked at death as ...
3 votes
Accepted

Did the early church record other events of handing people over to Satan?

The early church did indeed apply this language to specific cases, particularly in relation to God's judgment and church discipline. For example, Chrysostom describes Judas and Job as being "...
3 votes

What is the "present crisis" in 1 Corinthians 7?

Now concerning virgins παρθενων I have no commandment of the Lord: yet I give my judgment, as one that hath obtained mercy of the Lord to be faithful. I suppose therefore that this is good for the ...
  • 656
3 votes

How is 1 Corinthians 9:27 reconciled with the teaching that losing salvation is impossible?

Reformed theologians approach this verse in two ways: Paul is striving for a prize other than salvation Paul is proving, through his actions, that he is truly saved Striving for a prize John Gill ...

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