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Use this tag for questions about attitudes and doctrines regarding marriage. For questions relating specifically to same-sex marriage and polygamy, use the appropriate tags.

6
votes
No, it is not allowed: Canon 1085 §1. A person bound by the bond of a prior marriage, even if it was not consummated, invalidly attempts marriage. (Code of Canon Law) In other words, if … at which marriage is referred to as being between a man and a woman. Canon 1057, for example, states: §1. The consent of the parties, legitimately manifested between persons qualified by law …
answered Oct 7 '16 by Matt Gutting
5
votes
conditions that prevented the marriage from being valid in the first place: The radical sanation of an invalid marriage is its convalidation without the renewal of consent, which is granted by competent … section 1) Radical sanation can be issued by the local ordinary (usually the bishop of the diocese) in most cases, and always by the Holy See. Obstacles to validity of a marriage can take any of …
answered Jan 17 '16 by Matt Gutting
4
votes
To say that a marriage is invalid is to say that there was an obstacle (technically, an impediment) which prevents the couple from actually being married (not just from "being married in the eyes of … the Church"). Some of these obstacles are matters of divine law—for example, canon 1091 section 1: In the direct line of consanguinity marriage is invalid between all ancestors and descendants …
answered Sep 6 '17 by Matt Gutting
4
votes
that sexuality, and therefore marriage and the family, are oriented to the begetting and raising of children, it seems therefore that chastity is all about how one guides one's activity by a Catholic … understanding of the purpose of sex, marriage, and family. Peter Turner's answer is a good one to display the general principles by which one should determine for oneself what sort of behavior is …
answered Oct 16 '14 by Matt Gutting
3
votes
confirmation are to receive it before they are admitted to marriage if it can be done without grave inconvenience. (emphasis added) What constitutes "grave inconvenience" is ultimately up to the bishop … priest preparing the couple for marriage—ordinarily the pastor of the parish—ought to ask whether both have been confirmed, and typically requests their baptismal certificate, which has a record of the …
answered Jun 8 '17 by Matt Gutting
2
votes
"Blessing of a marriage", as explained by a canon lawyer and the staff of a Catholic parish, is a fairly standard laymen's term which can be used for one of two processes recognized by Catholic canon … law as allowing a marriage to be recognized as valid in the Catholic Church. The Church's Code of Canon Law has a whole section on marriage (canons 1055–1165). Among the regulations it lays down are …
answered Jan 15 '15 by Matt Gutting
3
votes
It depends. Catholicism views marriage as an important part of a Catholic's life, and something which (like so many important events) exists and should be celebrated in the context of the Church … ; that is, in the context of the community. Marriage between two Catholics is particularly significant in that it is sacramental; that is, it is a sign of God's grace by which divine life is dispensed to …
answered Feb 22 '16 by Matt Gutting
4
votes
The Code of Canon Law prevents certain people from marriage: Canon 1091 §1. In the direct line of consanguinity [blood relationship] marriage is invalid between all ancestors and descendants … , both legitimate and natural. §2. In the collateral line marriage is invalid up to and including the fourth degree [including the relationship aunt-nephew, uncle-niece, first cousins, and siblings …
answered Jan 16 '15 by Matt Gutting
2
votes
Quite simply, in order for a marriage to be consummated, it must first exist. Sexual activity between two unmarried people does not somehow "carry over" after they marry each other. Their activity is … not a sin, but part of the purpose of a state ordained by God. The difference is that marriage involves a total giving of each spouse to each: "Conjugal love involves a totality, in which all the …
answered Mar 30 '18 by Matt Gutting
7
votes
" (Catechism paragraph 2386) is not committing a moral offense. However, even in these two cases, the Church teaches that the civil divorce does not in itself end the marriage before God - indeed, that is … impossible if the marriage is valid: A marriage that is ratum et consummatum [that is, validly constituted, and subsequently consummated] can be dissolved by no human power and by no cause, except …
answered Aug 3 '15 by Matt Gutting
3
votes
recognize divorce as the end of a marriage, and so not recognize the validity of a marriage while either potential spouse is currently married. It follows that Ann and Chris are not, in the eyes of the … Church, married at all. And of course it follows from that that there's no second marriage to become valid. What Ann and Chris need to do to "regularize their situation" (that is, to ensure that …
answered Aug 1 '17 by Matt Gutting
3
votes
Sometimes. Canon 1059 of the Code of Canon Law states: Even if only one party is Catholic, the marriage of Catholics is governed not only by divine law but also by canon law, without prejudice … to the competence of civil authority concerning the merely civil effects of the same marriage. Therefore, the canons concerning marriage in the Catholic Church will be applied to the first marriage
answered Feb 16 '15 by Matt Gutting
3
votes
A monk is not "married" to his monastery in any sense at all, so there is nothing to be annulled. If a monk wishes to leave the monastery, he can ask for an "indult of exclaustration" (canon 686 secti …
answered Mar 8 '18 by Matt Gutting
7
votes
Gaudium et Spes says (section 50): Marriage to be sure is not instituted solely for procreation; rather, its very nature as an unbreakable compact between persons, and the welfare of the children … equal in importance to its procreative aspect is to say that the converse is true as well: that the unitive aspect is never more important than the procreative aspect. The Church believes that marriage
answered Apr 18 '16 by Matt Gutting
4
votes
raised: Children are really the supreme gift of marriage and contribute very substantially to the welfare of their parents. (Gaudium et Spes, section 50) As far as their legal status (by which … putative marriage [that is, a marriage which is thought to be valid by at least one of the parties] are legitimate. (Code of Canon Law, Canon 1137; emphasis added) Both parents have an obligation to …
answered Feb 16 '16 by Matt Gutting

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