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Christogram (Latin: Monogramma Christi) is a monogram or combination of letters that forms an abbreviation for the name of Jesus Christ, traditionally used as a religious symbol within the Church. As of today, two Christograms namely Chi Rho (XP) and IHS are in use, the former having an artistic look and the latter, a plain look. There is however, an intertwined version of IHS seen in some ancient churches like St Martin's in Northern France.

My question is: Are there other Christograms that were used by early Christians but are no more in use?

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I have seen the IX monogram (I for Iesous/Ιησους, X for Christos/Χριστος) on early Christian Roman sarcophagi in Ravenna and on early Byzantine sculptures. In a web search, I've also found Merovingian sarcophagi depicting it. I can't recall ever seeing it on more recent artwork, so I suppose it might have fallen into disuse in the early Middle Ages (please correct me if I'm mistaken).

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  • Could you possibly add a link to support your claim.
    – Ken Graham
    Jan 23 at 13:06
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Are there Christograms that were used by early Christians but are no more in use?

The short answer is no.

True that some are quite hard to find and are almost obsolete, but they are still to be found on modern times.

Even the IX monogram (I for Iesous/Ιησους, X for Christos/Χριστος) can be found occasionally.

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IX Christogram

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