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We read in Luke 24:31 (NRSVCE) how Jesus walked with two disciples on the way of Emmaus post-Resurrection and joined them for a meal:

When he was at the table with them, he took bread, blessed and broke it, and gave it to them.

We go on to read in Verses 40-43:

And when he had said this, he showed them his hands and his feet. While in their joy they were disbelieving and still wondering, he said to them, “Have you anything here to eat?” They gave him a piece of broiled fish, and he took it and ate in their presence.

It is implied that Jesus ate fish just in order to prove that he was not a ghost as had been feared by the disciples. But his partaking of the meal with the disciples at Emmaus was with a different purpose, and he may not have disappeared before eating the bread he had 'divided'.

We also see in Jn 21:13-14 how the Lord joined the disciples for a hearty meal by the Sea of Galilee, after the Resurrection:

Jesus came, took the bread and gave it to them, and did the same with the fish. This was now the third time Jesus appeared to his disciples after he was raised from the dead.

Going by the narrations of Luke and John, Jesus' physical body after the Resurrection had the attributes it had had prior to the event, more specifically, hunger and the need to consume food. But, St Paul has somewhat different view of resurrected body, as can be seen in 1 Cor 15:42-44:

So will it be with the resurrection of the dead. The body that is sown is perishable, it is raised imperishable; it is sown in dishonor, it is raised in glory; it is sown in weakness, it is raised in power; it is sown a natural body, it is raised a spiritual body.

My question therefore, is: How does the Catholic Church reconcile the picture of the resurrected body presented by St Paul in 1 Cor 15 vis-a-vis the narrations in Luke 24 and John 21 ?

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  • Are you referring in particular to the "it is sown a natural body, it is raised a spiritual body." part of 1 Cor 15? Feb 8, 2023 at 8:08
  • In fact, St Paul presents his concept in different phraseology in different verses . For instance, when he says ` the raised body is imperishable' it implies that it (the body) does not require food to sustain, otherwise, how could it be imperishable ? Feb 8, 2023 at 8:46
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    "Jesus' physical body after the Resurrection had the attributes it had had prior to the event, more specifically, hunger and the need to consume food" None of the verses you quoted said that he had hunger or a need to consume food. Being able to eat is not the same as needing to eat. There's no clear contradiction with 1 Cor 15.
    – curiousdannii
    Feb 8, 2023 at 11:52
  • Thanks, curiousdannii. Call this as a childish argument, but to quote Jesus himself " Don’t you see that whatever enters the mouth goes into the stomach and then out of the body? " (Mtt 15:17) . That is the natural cycle of food, even if one takes it without the need for it. A plausible argument in Jesus' case is that his body post-Resurrection was meant to stay put on earth for forty days. So, he had to eat and drink water to sustain the body. So were the cases of the saints who had been brought back to life at the time of the Lord's death on the cross. (Mtt 2&;52-53) . Feb 9, 2023 at 6:53

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