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We read in Lev 6:12-13 (NIV) :

The fire on the altar must be kept burning; it must not go out. Every morning the priest is to add firewood and arrange the burnt offering on the fire and burn the fat of the fellowship offerings on it. The fire must be kept burning on the altar continuously; it must not go out.

The churches of Catholic denomination which have the Holy Eucharist present in the Tabernacle, have the tradition of keeping the altar lamp on 24x7. It is not clear if the practice owes its origin to Lev 6. If that be so, the altar lamp should be kept on even if the Holy Eucharist is not present, say, in small parishes where Holy Mass is said by a visiting priest only on Sundays. Similarly, churches of non-Catholic denominations where the Holy Eucharist is not kept, can also have the lamp burning provided there is an altar .My question therefore is: Does any non-Catholic denomination maintain Altar Lamp, following Lev 6:12-13 ?

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Does any non-Catholic denomination maintain Altar Lamp, following Lev 6:12-13?

The Orthodox Churches have vigil lights, just like Catholic Churches to indicate that that Christ is present in the Holy Eucharist.

A tabernacle, also known as an artophorion, is a container on the altar table of an Orthodox Christian Church specifically used to reserve the Eucharist, the presence of Jesus Christ.

In the Orthodox Church, the reserve sacrament is kept in the tabernacle on the altar table at all times. The tabernacle is usually elaborately decorated, normally wrought with gold, silver, or wood and precious adornments. The tabernacle is often shaped like a miniature church building. Every year on Holy Thursday, the priest consumes whatever is left of the reserve sacrament and places some of the sacrament left over from the Holy Thursday Divine Liturgy into the tabernacle. The presence of Christ in the tabernacle is always indicated by a vigil lamp, burning perpetually. - Tabernacle (liturgical)

In Anglican, Old Catholic and Roman Catholic churches, the chancel lamp burns before a tabernacle to demonstrate their belief of the Real Presence of Christ in the Blessed Sacrament which is reserved in these denominations.

An altar lamp, also known as a chancel lamp, refers to a light which is located in the chancel (sanctuary), of various Christian churches. In Anglican, Old Catholic and Roman Catholic churches, the chancel lamp burns before a tabernacle or ambry to demonstrate the belief of the Real Presence of Christ in the Blessed Sacrament which is reserved in these denominations. It is also found in the chancel of Lutheran and Methodist churches to indicate the presence of Christ in the sanctuary, as well as a belief in the Real Presence of Christ in the Eucharist.[1][2] The sanctuary lamp may also be seen in Eastern Orthodox Churches. Other Christian denominations burn the lamp as a symbol of the light of Christ always burning in an otherwise sin-darkened world.

The practice is also influenced by Judaism in the Old Testament; in the book of Exodus, God told Moses that a lamp filled with the pure oil should perpetually burn in the Tabernacle. This is the precedent for the custom in the Anglican Church and Catholic Church of burning a candle (at all times) before the tabernacle – the house where the Eucharistic Body of Christ is reserved under lock and key. In Jewish practice, this Altar lamp is known for its Hebrew name, Ner Tamid (Hebrew: "eternal flame or eternal light). - Altar Lamp

It could be noted that not all Anglican Churches follow this practice.

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    The writer of that second article should have added "some" when mentioning Anglican churches. Feb 6 at 11:03

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