2

Dei Filius, a Dogmatic Constitution of the First Vatican Council, includes the following paragraph:

This sole true God by His goodness and "omnipotent power," not to increase His own beatitude, and not to add to, but to manifest His perfection by the blessings which He bestows on creatures, with most free volition, "immediately from the beginning of time fashioned each creature out of nothing, spiritual and corporeal, namely angelic and mundane; and then the human creation, common as it were, composed of both spirit and body" [Lateran Council IV, can. 2 and 5]

The constitution cites the Fourth Lateran Council, canons 2 and 5, but I cannot find any such remarks in the canons themselves. What am I missing?

1
  • 1
    I didn't know Dei Filius cited Lateran IV verbatim. Interesting.
    – Geremia
    Commented Jan 1, 2022 at 3:35

2 Answers 2

2

The Latin of that passage from Dei Filius ch. 1 is:

Hic solus verus Deus bonitate sua et ["]omnipotenti virtute["] non ad augendam suam beatitudinem, nec ad acquirendam, sed ad manifestandam perfectionem suam per bona, quæ creaturis impertitur, liberrimo consilio ["]simul ab initio temporis utramque de nihilo condidit creaturam, spiritualem et corporalem, angelicam videlicet et mundanam, ac deinde humanam quasi communem ex spiritu et corpore constitutam.["]

I've added quotation marks corresponding to those in the translation you cited.

It corresponds to Canon 1 of Lateran IV's Firmiter:

  1. Firmiter credimus, et simpliciter confitemur, quod unus solus est verus Deus, æternus, et immensus, omnipotens, incommutabilis, incomprehensibilis et ineffabilis, Pater, et Filius, et Spiritus Sanctus; tres quidem personæ, sed una essentia, substantia, seu natura simplex omnino. Pater a nullo, Filius autem a solo Patre, ac Spiritus Sanctus ab utroque pariter, absque initio semper et fine. Pater generans, Filius nascens, et Spiritus Sanctus procedens; consubstantiales et coæquales, coomnipotentes et coæterni, unum universorum principium, creator omnium invisibilium et visibilium, spiritualium et corporalium, qui sua omnipotenti virtute [almighty power] simul ab initio temporis utramque de nihilo condidit creaturam, spiritualem et corporalem, angelicam videlicet et mundanam, ac deinde humanam, quasi communem ex spiritu et corpore constitutam [created out of nothing, from the very first beginning of time, both the spiritual and the corporeal creature, to wit, the angelical and the mundane, and afterwards the human creature, as partaking, in a sense, of both, consisting of spirit and of body.]. Diabolus enim et dæmones alii, a Deo quidem natura creati sunt boni, sed ipsi per se facti sunt mali; homo vero diaboli suggestione peccavit.

Latin from: H. J. Schroeder, O.P., Disciplinary Decrees of the General Councils: Text, Translation and Commentary, p. 560.
English translation from: Cdl. Manning's translation of Dei Filius

Who knows why your cited translation of Dei Filius cites Lateran IV canons 2 and 5 there.

Update: dott.sa Giulia Capasso, Responsabile della Segreteria di Redazione, has corrected it:

We have checked the exact quote and have changed the quotation in [Lateran Council IV, ch. 1].

1

If we see the Latin text of Vatican I Dei Filius document, the reference is a little different: "Conc. Later. IV c. Firmiter". Firmiter actually refers to the first Latin word of Canon 1 of the 1215 Lateran Council IV document in Latin:

Firmiter credimus et simpliciter confitemur quod unus solus est verus Deus æternus et immensus omnipotens incommutabilis incomprehensibilis et ineffabilis Pater et Filius et Spiritus Sanctus tres quidem personæ sed una essentia substantia seu natura simplex omnino. ...

It's possible that the English translation of Vatican I Dei Filius hosted by the inters.org website refers to Canon 1 (Confession of Faith) sentence #2 rather than Canon 2 (On the error of abbot Joachim) and Canon 5 (The dignity of the patriarchal sees). (See suggested English titles of the canons from an English translation of the Lateran IV document hosted by the Documenta Catholica Omnia website).

Going back to the English translation of the Lateran IV document you used from Fordham University, Canon 1 sentence #2 is (I bolded the quote from Vatican I):

The Father begetting, the Son begotten, and the Holy Ghost proceeding; consubstantial and coequal, co-omnipotent and coeternal, the one principle of the universe, Creator of all things invisible and visible, spiritual and corporeal, who from the beginning of time and by His omnipotent power made from nothing creatures both spiritual and corporeal, angelic, namely, and mundane, and then human, as it were, common, composed of spirit and body.

while sentence #5 is about Jesus:

Who according to His divinity is immortal and impassable, according to His humanity was made passable and mortal, suffered on the cross for the salvation of the human race, and being dead descended into hell, rose from the dead, and ascended into heaven.

Compare Canon 1 sentence #2 with the quotation in the Vatican I Dei Filius paragraph:

This sole true God by His goodness and "omnipotent power," not to increase His own beatitude, and not to add to, but to manifest His perfection by the blessings which He bestows on creatures, with most free volition, "immediately from the beginning of time fashioned each creature out of nothing, spiritual and corporeal, namely angelic and mundane; and then the human creation, common as it were, composed of both spirit and body"

To compare the quote in Latin, please see Geremia's answer.

1
  • Denzinger (DH 3002) appends the following text to the end of the English translation: "[Fourth Lateran Council *800; cann. 2 and 5 below]." Perhaps this means that Chapters 2 and 5 of Dei Filius are to be conferred, rather than that of Lateran IV. Could that be correct? @Geremia
    – Doubt
    Commented Jan 8, 2022 at 3:35

You must log in to answer this question.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .