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Baptism and the Lord's supper are means of grace in Reformed theology, but yet we don't see it explicitly mentioned in Calvinist ordo salutis.

According to one Reformed pastor writing for the Theopolis Institute in his essay 2017 "The Changing Face of Reformed Theology" this is a problem that is recently being addressed by going back to Calvin and looking afresh at how Paul views the benefits of union with Christ, which according to the author can roughly be viewed as colors refracted from a multi-faceted diamond instead of sequentially:

Most people are taught in Reformed churches and seminaries, to think linearly about salvation (e.g. Justification leads to Sanctification which leads to Glorification). ... This is called the ordo salutis (Latin term: “order of salvation”). It’s the Reformed way of explaining the application of salvation to a person from beginning to end. Once a person is justified, the other benefits follow in due course. If a person is “truly” justified, the rest will follow.

This is one reason why Reformed theology has always struggled to “fit” the sacraments into any meaningful place in its systematic theology. If the golden chain of salvation can’t break, then it’s difficult to see how baptism is really all that important or why the Lord’s Supper is necessary. ... While Reformed theology held to the Lord’s Supper as a “means of grace” it was rare to find a Reformed church practice weekly communion or place it on par with preaching. The sacraments were aids to faith–crutches if you will–but not really necessary in the life and practice of Reformed churches considering the logical consequences of the “golden chain.” ...

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... Calvin had a strong view of union with Christ and saw the benefits of Christ flowing from that union. But after Calvin, as Reformed theology developed historically into a system—forged in the fires of conflict against Catholicism, Arminianism, and Lutheranism, etc.—it began to use salvation terminology in a way that was distinct from the bible. ...

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Dr. Gaffin noticed, in the Apostle Paul’s language, a person is engrafted into union with the resurrected Christ. As a result of this union, one is justified, adopted, sanctified, glorified–and all the other benefits of this union—at the moment one has faith in Christ. But Dr. Gaffin also saw that there are future aspects to the benefits of salvation as well, “…for Paul the justification, adoption, sanctification, and glorification of the believer are future as well as present.”((Ibid. p. 133)) In Paul’s usage, salvation language is not nicely sequential–flowing from one benefit or distinct act to another such as justification leading to sanctification—as if they are in some golden chain.

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The diamond is union with Christ. All the different colors that are refracted from the diamond are the benefits that are seen depending upon the angle you view the diamond. ...

My question: How do key Reformed theologians, past and present, connect Baptism and the Lord's supper as means of grace into the ordo salutis in their systematic theologies?

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