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Note: for better readability, the relevant parts of the quoted passages are in bold.

Ezekiel 18:21-28 (ESV):

21 “But if a wicked person turns away from all his sins that he has committed and keeps all my statutes and does what is just and right, he shall surely live; he shall not die. 22 None of the transgressions that he has committed shall be remembered against him; for the righteousness that he has done he shall live. 23 Have I any pleasure in the death of the wicked, declares the Lord God, and not rather that he should turn from his way and live? 24 But when a righteous person turns away from his righteousness and does injustice and does the same abominations that the wicked person does, shall he live? None of the righteous deeds that he has done shall be remembered; for the treachery of which he is guilty and the sin he has committed, for them he shall die.

25 “Yet you say, ‘The way of the Lord is not just.’ Hear now, O house of Israel: Is my way not just? Is it not your ways that are not just? 26 When a righteous person turns away from his righteousness and does injustice, he shall die for it; for the injustice that he has done he shall die. 27 Again, when a wicked person turns away from the wickedness he has committed and does what is just and right, he shall save his life. 28 Because he considered and turned away from all the transgressions that he had committed, he shall surely live; he shall not die.

Ezekiel 33:12-16 (ESV):

12 “And you, son of man, say to your people, The righteousness of the righteous shall not deliver him when he transgresses, and as for the wickedness of the wicked, he shall not fall by it when he turns from his wickedness, and the righteous shall not be able to live by his righteousness when he sins. 13 Though I say to the righteous that he shall surely live, yet if he trusts in his righteousness and does injustice, none of his righteous deeds shall be remembered, but in his injustice that he has done he shall die. 14 Again, though I say to the wicked, ‘You shall surely die,’ yet if he turns from his sin and does what is just and right, 15 if the wicked restores the pledge, gives back what he has taken by robbery, and walks in the statutes of life, not doing injustice, he shall surely live; he shall not die. 16 None of the sins that he has committed shall be remembered against him. He has done what is just and right; he shall surely live.

When I first read these passages, my immediate impression was that a righteous person could certainly lose their salvation if for whatever reason they decided to abandon the narrow path and turn to evil. To see whether other people were in the same interpretative boat as me, I decided to post this question on Hermeneutics.SE, which received a very prompt and comprehensive reply by a high rep user who essentially said "Yes, I agree". That's personally relieving, but at the same time problematic if one adheres to the doctrine of Eternal Security, because it is a direct contradiction to its postulate that salvation cannot be lost.

Question: How do Eternal Security adherents interpret Ezekiel 18:21-18 and Ezekiel 33:12-16 (quoted above)? Do they find these passages problematic or challenging?

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    The crux of the question (which has not been addressed by your link to the 'comprehensive answer') is the matter of 'righteousness'. Paul was outwardly 'blameless' according to law, but, within, he was slaughtered by a commandment (thou shalt not covet) which made him 'wretched' and revealed that 'in his flesh was no good thing'. With the heart, man believeth unto righteousness. And out of that faith (and by the Holy Spirit given to such faith) come good works. OSAS (once saved, always saved) also, does not address the matter of what righteousness (of God) actually is. But still, up-voted +1.
    – Nigel J
    Apr 4 at 4:20

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