2

The one I've been subscribing to for almost 2 years is this one

en-gb.christian#holiday@group.v.calendar.google.com

This can be accessed here or here I guess (re region: I have not seen any differences between these 2 for Nov2020-Dec2021).

I can no longer recall where I found this. When I look this up, I don't see, on the 1st page of my google search results, any official site. I notice it

  1. is missing: 'Christ the King' (but it's always on Sunday, so ok fine) and

  2. is missing: New year's, which I mistaken in thinking it wasn't a holy day of obligation in certain countries because apparently new year is precisely the day Solemnity of Mary, Mother of God is celebrated in Catholicism (and Eastern Orthodox Church, Anglican Communion and the Lutheran Church)

  3. is missing: Solemnity of Mary, Mother of God on new year or any other day of the calendar

  4. contains: Feast of the Immaculate Conception.


Questions:

  1. Of what denomination/s and region/s is this above calendar?
  • I'm realising just now that the 'gb' is possibly (some subset of) the UK.

    • (According to Wiki: The UK doesn't have uniform holy days of obligation. See Scotland vs England and Wales. Also, each contains neither 'Solemnity of Mary, Mother of God' nor 'Feast of the Immaculate Conception'.)
  • Not sure it's (UK or whatever) Catholic.

  1. Is there some kind of catholic google calendar that covers all regions? Or at least a list of google calendar links for each region (eg the philippines, hong kong, united states, argentina, etc) ? Hopefully, it includes all the holy days of obligation for all regions.
  • I'm talking about Roman Catholic, but if there's a calendar that contains both Roman and Eastern Catholic (This question extends to Eastern Catholicism and whatever is full communion with Roman Catholicism), then fine.
5
  • @Geremia thanks. what is this exactly please? any english versions? this appears to be in latin
    – BCLC
    Nov 23 '20 at 4:14
  • Some feasts are transferred to the following Sunday in certain countries. In Canada, the Immaculate Conception is not a Day of Obligation! Regional calendars are very common place. Eastern Rite Churches have their own particular calendar.
    – Ken Graham
    Nov 23 '20 at 4:15
  • 1
    @Geremia I believe the OP is inquiring of the Ordinary Form of the Mass!
    – Ken Graham
    Nov 23 '20 at 4:27
  • @KenGraham ok i've got the ones for where i live and where i'm from. hoping to have one FOR ALL please. edited post.
    – BCLC
    Dec 5 '20 at 7:26
2

Google calendar for catholic holdiays/holy days of obligation?

Questions:

  1. Of what denomination/s and region/s is this above calendar?

  2. Is there some kind of catholic google calendar that covers all regions? Or at least a list of google calendar links for each region (eg the philippines, hong kong, united states, argentina, etc) ? Hopefully, it includes all the holy days of obligation for all regions.

I'm talking about Roman Catholic(ism).

1.) Of what region is this above calendar?

The liturgical calendar you linked to is what the Church calls a particular liturgical calendar for England. That much is obvious.

2.) Is there some kind of catholic google calendar that covers all regions?

Oh how I hate to use Wikipedia as a unique source of information, but the question is so vast liturgically speaking, that this is the only source with the vast information necessary. The article on the General Roman Calendar

The article gives the entire General Roman Calendar as well as particular liturgical calendars of the main religious orders as well as all local national liturgical calendars.

General Roman Calendar

For historical forms of the General Roman Calendar, see Tridentine Calendar, General Roman Calendar of 1954, General Roman Calendar of Pope Pius XII, General Roman Calendar of 1960, and General Roman Calendar of 1969.

The General Roman Calendar is the liturgical calendar that indicates the dates of celebrations of saints and mysteries of the Lord (Jesus Christ) in the Roman Rite, wherever this liturgical rite is in use. These celebrations are a fixed annual date; or occur on a particular day of the week (examples are the Baptism of the Lord in January and the Feast of Christ the King in November); or relate to the date of Easter (examples are the celebrations of the Sacred Heart of Jesus and the Immaculate Heart of Mary). National and diocesan liturgical calendars, including that of the diocese of Rome itself as well as the calendars of religious institutes and even of continents, add other saints and mysteries or transfer the celebration of a particular saint or mystery from the date assigned in the General Calendar to another date.

Particular calendars

The General Calendar is printed, for instance, in the Roman Missal6 and the Liturgy of the Hours.7 These are up to date when printed, but additional feasts may be added later. For that reason, if those celebrating the liturgy have not inserted into the books a note about the changes, they must consult the current annual publication, known as the "Ordo", for their country or religious congregation. These annual publications, like those that, disregarding the feasts that are obligatory in the actual church where the liturgy is celebrated, list only celebrations included in the General Calendar,8 are useful only for the current year, since they omit celebrations impeded because of falling on a Sunday or during periods such as Holy Week and the Octave of Easter.

The feast days of saints celebrated in one country are not necessarily celebrated everywhere. For example, a diocese or a country may celebrate the feast day of a saint of special importance there (e.g., St. Patrick in Ireland, Our Lady of Guadalupe in Mexico, St. Elizabeth Ann Seton in the United States). Likewise, a particular religious institute may celebrate its founder or members of the institute, even if that saint is not listed on the universal calendar or is included in it only with a lower rank. The General Roman Calendar contains only those celebrations that are intended to be observed in the Roman Rite in every country of the world.

This distinction is in application of the decision of the Second Vatican Council: "Lest the feasts of the saints should take precedence over the feasts which commemorate the very mysteries of salvation, many of them should be left to be celebrated by a particular Church or nation or family of religious; only those should be extended to the universal Church which commemorate saints who are truly of universal importance."

Simply scroll down to find the General Calendar of the Roman Rite. Further down you able to see all the Congregational Calendars (Each institute of consecrated life (religious institute or secular institute) also has its own calendar, with variations from the General Calendar). Continue further and you can read all the National Calendars and finally Local calendars.

Eastern Rite Catholics have their own liturgical calendars and must found elsewhere as their calendars differ vastly when compared to the Roman Rite and even between themselves.

Here follows some examples of Eastern Rite Catholic Calendars:

Liturgical Calendar of the Ukrainian Catholic Archeparchy of Winnipeg, Canada

Maronite Catholic Lectionary

1
  • I don't think OP's calendar is a liturgical calendar for England, neither RC nor C of E. For instance Good Friday links to a list of US states and Christmas Eve 2021 is described as a day off, which it isn't in England. Also Whit Monday is mentioned though dropped from the RC calendar, and Whit Tuesday omitted (though in C of E). In short the calendar OP linked to appears to me to have no authjorisation from the RC or C of E but is merely some random persons compllation of commonly known Christian holidays. The second part of the answer (main part) is very interesting. Thanks.
    – davidlol
    Mar 25 at 19:54

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