1

We are using KJV version of Bible in our app distributed globally and we are based out of Canada. KJV is in public domain except UK. Does it mean that we should restrict the users in UK.

15
  • 1
    Why not use another public domain translation that isn't restricted in the UK? The KJV is also very old and shouldn't be used by non-experts. – curiousdannii Oct 20 '20 at 13:20
  • 4
    @curiousdannii The KJV ... shouldn't be used by non-experts I have been reading the KJV since I was old enough to read (65 years ago) and nobody told me there was an 'expert' certificate required. How do I get one ? – Nigel J Oct 20 '20 at 13:49
  • 2
    @NigelJ If you've been reading the KJV for 65 years you probably are an expert. But the KJV is 400 year old language and some words have changed their meaning, leading the casual reader to misunderstand. Something I'm sure you know. – DJClayworth Oct 20 '20 at 14:38
  • 2
    is this really a Christianity question? seems more like a legal question – depperm Oct 20 '20 at 15:41
  • 1
    @BitChaser, Thank you for your thoughts. As suggested in this thread, I reached out to CUP and awaiting for their response. Also, as you suggested, I am providing other public domain versions such as Bible in Basic English, American Standard Version. Reached out to NIV but not sure if I get the permission. – Sunny Oct 23 '20 at 22:13
4

The protection that the Authorized Version, and also the Book of Common Prayer, enjoy is the last remnant of the time when the Crown held a monopoly over all printing and publishing in the United Kingdom.[166] Almost all provisions granting copyright in perpetuity were abolished by the Copyright, Designs and Patents Act 1988, but because the Authorized Version is protected by royal prerogative rather than copyright, it will remain protected, as specified in CDPA s171(1)(b).[j]

Cambridge University Press permits the reproduction of at most 500 verses for "liturgical and non-commercial educational use" if their prescribed acknowledgement is included, the quoted verses do not exceed 25% of the publication quoting them and do not include a complete Bible book.[167] For use beyond this, the Press is willing to consider permission requested on a case-by-case basis and in 2011 a spokesman said the Press generally does not charge a fee but tries to ensure that a reputable source text is used.

Wikipedia - King James Version

4
  • Thank you. We are a startup working on the mobile application to allow users to read bible. So, in our case, do we need to check with Press for license? – Sunny Oct 20 '20 at 13:06
  • 1
    In my opinion, legally, yes you do, but you need professional legal advice, not my advice. – Nigel J Oct 20 '20 at 13:43
  • If CUP "generally does not charge a fee but tries to ensure that a reputable source text is used" then the easiest way is probably to talk to CUP. If they give permission without a fee then you are fine and have saved a lawyer fee. – DJClayworth Oct 20 '20 at 14:39
  • 1
    Thank you. Will reach out to them – Sunny Oct 20 '20 at 15:06

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.