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This question is connected to this question and this question.

As the title mentioned, I'm not expecting an answer which use name of the days in the week (such as Saturday, Sunday, etc)... but the N(th) day of the week (for example the 1st, 2nd, 3rd, etc).

If I myself answer my own question independently (not using the point of view from anyone), the "based" I use first is :
Jesus resurrection is in the 1st day of the week, the third day after His body put in the tomb.

Then counting backward:
the 7th day of the week is the second day after His body put in the tomb.
the 6th day of the week is the first day after His body put in the tomb.
So, (my own conclusion) Jesus died on the 5th day of the week.

Why I ask specific to the Adventist, because :

  1. One Adventist member in a Christian Forum in my language say "Friday" is the day when Jesus died at the cross. But he can't answer it when I ask him to answer with the N(th) day of the week, not the name of the days.
  2. I can't find in the internet about my question which specifically mentioned it comes from the Adventist.
  3. The articles I found in the internet is not clear coming from what denomination and they have different answer using the name of the days.
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    Not an adventist here, so not posting as an answer, but the bible spells it out pretty explicitely that Jesus died the day before the Sabbath (which means he died on the 6th day, since the Sabbath is the 7th), and rose on the day after Sabbath, the 1st day. The three days are 6th, 7th and 1st. On all of those the body was in the grave at one point. – kutschkem Aug 17 '20 at 13:34
  • This should be listed as an answer, it's accurate and very concise. – Tensigh Aug 17 '20 at 21:53
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    Partly right,, Kutschkem, but like the Catholic church, you're missing the key part about Jewish Holidays. All Holidays are Shabbat. Scripture is clear that there were 2 Shabbat. As you said, Christ died before Shabbat- Passover is preparation day for High Sabbath of Unleavened Bread. No work is done, no buying or selling. Then the Second shabbat is Frid sundown to Saturday sundown. Scripture says they bought spices after the sabbath. Catholic church incorrectly thought this was Saturday. Impossible to buy 100 lbs of spices after sundown on Saturday. – Tennman7 Dec 23 '20 at 4:20
  • The critical issue with traditional "Easter Friday" is that it introduces a contradiction between these two verses: Mark 16:1 "… when the sabbath was past … bought sweet spices …" and Luke 23:56 "… prepared spices and ointments; and rested the sabbath day according to the commandment". The contradiction (spices both before and after a sabbath day) can be eliminated by ignoring tradition and understanding that John 19:31 "… for that sabbath day was an high day" means that there were two sabbaths: the annual Passover (Thursday) and the commandment 7th day (Saturday). – Ray Butterworth Dec 23 '20 at 19:12
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Here’s a quote from one of the most authoritative Seventh-day Adventist sources you can find.

On the sixth day of the week they had seen their Master die. - Ellen White, Desire of Ages, page 794

And as already pointed out, this matches the Bible account that Jesus was crucified on the day before the Sabbath, which Seventh-day Adventists believe is the 7th day.

Here’s a short timeline:

  • 6th day - Jesus was crucified, died, and was buried. (Note: they did not wait until the next day to bury Him.)
  • 7th day - He rested in the tomb.
  • 1st day - He rose from the dead.

Here are more Seventh-day Adventist sources:

It was not by chance that the Saviour was crucified upon Friday, the sixth day of the week. - SN Haskell, The Cross and its Shadow, page 97

We know that the Saviour was crucified “the day before the Sabbath.” Mark 15:42. We know that the Sabbath was “the Sabbath day according to the commandment” (Luke 23:54-56), and that was the seventh day—Saturday—and therefore “the day before,” was the sixth day—Friday. - AT Jones, Signs of the Times, March 11, 1886

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  • Thank you for the answer, asg. So, if for example there is a sentence : "after one day Jesus in the tomb, on the first day Jesus in the tomb, Jesus rise from the death" ... am I correct to conclude that from the sentence above it means : "Jesus rise from the death on the 6th day of the week" ? Please correct me if I'm wrong. – karma Aug 18 '20 at 7:57
  • "after one day Jesus in the tomb, on the first day Jesus in the tomb, Jesus rise from the death" I'm sorry but I have no idea what that means. I don't see how that could be interpreted to mean, "Jesus rise from the death on the 6th day of the week." Can you clarify/rephrase that? – asg Aug 18 '20 at 8:34
  • asg, "after 3 days Jesus in the tomb, on the 3rd day Jesus in the tomb, Jesus rise from the death" ===> "Jesus rise from the death on the 1st day of the week". So... if there is a sentence : "after 2 days Jesus in the tomb, on the 2nd day Jesus in the tomb, Jesus rise from the death" then it means "Jesus rise from the death on the 7th day of the week". Next, if there is a sentence : "after one day Jesus in the tomb, on the 1st day Jesus in the tomb, Jesus rise from the death" then it means "Jesus rise from the death on the 6th day of the week". – karma Aug 18 '20 at 9:40
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    @karma That makes sense, assuming I understand what you’re trying to say. However, “after N days” and “on the Nth day” general don’t mean the same thing. – asg Aug 18 '20 at 11:55
  • I understand that. But in this case, I follow what is propose from the Christian link, asg. “the third day” is equivalent to “after three days.” which is in my other question https://hermeneutics.stackexchange.com/questions/49965/how-many-hours-esther-already-fast-at-the-time-she-go-to-the-palace. So, "on the Nth day" = "after N day/s". – karma Aug 20 '20 at 2:23
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The quote here, doesn't reflect the views of many Adventists. It should be noted that many reject the teachings of Ellen White who plagiarized the work of someone else. "We know that the Saviour was crucified “the day before the Sabbath.” Mark 15:42. We know that the Sabbath was “the Sabbath day according to the commandment” (Luke 23:54-56), and that was the seventh day—Saturday—and therefore “the day before,” was the sixth day—Friday. - AT Jones, Signs of the Times, March 11, 1886". This is the exact same mistake made by the Catholic church. They don't understand Jewish culture, or Jewish feasts, or the Hebrew calendar.
Scripture is clear that there were two Sabbaths that week. In Hebrew, Shabbat is the weekly sabbath, and the feasts are also Shabbat.
So people see that Christ was crucified the day before the Sabbath - and they think weekly sabbath - so the day before would be Friday. But Feast of Unleavened Bread is a high Sabbath - no work can be done and buying and selling is forbidden. Passover is Nisan 14th - and the day of preparation for Unleavened Bread. Nisan 15th. "After the Sabbaths" [plural] the women bought spices. Weekly sabbath is Sunset Friday to Sunset Saturday. - Think about it. It's impossible to go buy spices after sunset Saturday. In the first century - The only light after sunset is candles. Your question is quite confusing and not clear - but I'll try to use your number of week day- not names of day, **But we have to remember that Hebrew day is Sunset to Sunset.

  • Jesus Crucified 4th day- afternoon- Passover.
  • 5th day is high Shabbat/sabbath Feast of Unleavened Bread. No work, no buying. Women rest.
  • 6th day women buy spices - prepare for weekly sabbath.
  • 7th Day - weekly sabbath - no work allowed, no buying allowed. 2nd Sabbath of Holy Week.
  • it's twilight, just after sunset - first day of the week starts. Sunday - Women are so anxious, and rush to the tomb, as soon as they can- after sunset. Arrive at the tomb, still dark. Saturday evening - Jesus is already risen. Christ crucified day 4 - afternoon. In the tomb, day 5,6,7, [3 days and 3 nights, just like scripture says in Jonah, and just like Christ himself said - 3 days and 3 nights in the heart of the earth.
    On day 1 - Women arrive - Jesus had already risen.
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It is easy to find the correspondance between the Nth day of the week (as written in the Bible) with our days of the week. We gave the name "Sunday" to the Biblical first day of the week, Monday to the second, Saturday to the 7th etc.

There are a couple of things that make it more complex. One is that the Biblical days ran from one evening to another, not from midnight to midnight. So if something happened at 9pm on Friday (in our time reckoning) that would be Saturday (7th day) in the Biblical way of working.

The second complexity is that some societies changed the way they numbered the days. For example Europeans often started calling Sunday the 7th day and Monday the first day. But this is an invention of middle-age Europeans, centuries after Christ, and not anything to do with the Biblical numbering.

However in terms of the crucifixion the numbering is very easy. The resurrection appearances are clearly described in the Bible as being "on the first day of the week", and the crucifixion as being the day before the sabbath, i.e. the sixth day. Since both these events happened before evening, they occurred on Sunday and Friday respectively.

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  • The day following Jesus' crucifixion was a "special sabbath" -- presumably the feast of unleavened bread -- which of course could have been the seventh day, but some claim it was not. I think this should be mentioned unless no seventh day adventist source mentions it at all. – Bit Chaser Aug 18 '20 at 3:44
  • @BitChaser In the previous chapter we have shown that it was not by chance that in the year the Saviour was crucified the Passover came on Friday, the sixth day of the week. Neither was it by, chance that the ceremonial Sabbath, the fifteenth day of Abib, came upon the seventh-day Sabbath of the Lord. It was type meeting antitype. The beloved disciple John, said, “That Sabbath was a high day,” which term was used whenever the ceremonial annual Sabbath came upon the weekly Sabbath of the Lord. - SN Haskell, The Cross and its Shadow, page 104 – asg Aug 19 '20 at 10:51
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    Bitchaser, you are spot on. The thing is that there are other protestant evangelicals who reject the Friday crucifixion myth. Church of God and many adventists, as well as other non-Denominational Christians. The reason is that Church of God and Adventists are more well educated about Jewish feasts, and the Jewish calendar. The only sign that Christ gave that he is the Messiah is the sign of Jonah - 3 days and 3 nights. Impossible to get 3 days and 3 nights with Friday crucifixion. Also impossible for women to buy spices after weekly sabbath. - it ends sunset on Saturday night. – Tennman7 Dec 23 '20 at 4:55

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