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In the sacramental offering of the Holy Mass, the priest presided acting as alter-Christus to offer the "bread & wine" to be consecrated to God.

Jesus is the High Priest, but in Calvary Jesus himself is the "sacrificial offering" to atone for the sins committed by all mankind.

My question is, If Calvary is a Holy Mass as the Catholic Church teaches and Jesus is the "sacrificial offering" then who is the priest that offer Jesus as a pleasing and acceptable sacrifice to the Abba Father?

Jesus offered himself as a sacrifice, did Jesus at the same time presided over the Holy Mass at Calvalry? I am quite confused at the scene at Calvalry, it would be fitting that another priest will offer Jesus "body & blood" to the Father as revealed thru the prayer taught by Jesus to St.Faustina;

"Eternal Father I offer Thee the body & blood, soul & divinity of our Lord Jesus Christ in atonement for our sins and those of the whole world." (Divine Mercy prayer)

It would seem that the Divine Mercy prayer is revealing that someone offered Jesus as a pleasing sacrifice to the Father at Calvary and not himself.

Reference:

  1. Pope Francis homily "The Mass as Calvary" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TsrAnicnTg4

"The mass means repeating Calvary". (Pope Francis) For the full text here's the link;https://opusdei.org/en-ph/article/the-mass-means-repeating-calvary/

  1. CALVARY AND THE MASS

A Missal Companion

by Archbishop Fulton J. Sheen, Ph.D., D.D., LL.D., Litt.D. https://www.ewtn.com/catholicism/library/calvary-and-the-mass-12566

NOTE: The Last Supper is the First Sacramental Mass instituted by Jesus Christ as the Eucharistic Sacrifice.

The Real Mass is the bloody sacrifice of the Jesus "real body & blood" at Calvalry and CCC1382 states that the "sacrifice at the Cross" is perpetuated in the "sacramental mass" to commemorate an unbloody sacrifice.

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    As you said, Jesus offered Himself on Calvary. (And the Catholic church's liturgy agrees, for example in the preface for the feast of Christ the King: "seipsum in ara crucis hostiam immaculatam et pacificam offerens".) So Jesus is the priest offering the sacrifice. – Andreas Blass Dec 17 '19 at 17:35
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    Do you have a Catholic source that states that Calvary is view as holy mass? – Ken Graham Dec 17 '19 at 23:29
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    Can you please post the exact quote into your question. For Catholics, the first ”Mass” was at the Last Supper in which Christ instituted the Eucharist and it was completed the next day at Calvary. – Ken Graham Dec 18 '19 at 0:22
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    I am voting to close this question because of two reasons. It is worded in an ambiguous way of what Catholicism defines as the mass and the OP will not post a Catholic source and link and then posting a quote that testifies to the supposedly view that ”Calvary is seen as a Holy Mass and Jesus is the sacrifice.” – Ken Graham Dec 18 '19 at 22:14
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    Please post a quote, my friend. The video is in Italian. An official translation may fly. What about your Archbishop Fulton Sheen quote? Pope Francis is not saying what you imply! In fact, ”Pope Francis said: that we should approach the celebration of the Mass as if we were approaching Calvary.” Neither source states that the Mass is Calvary!!! – Ken Graham Dec 19 '19 at 1:18
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Discussing the efficient cause of Christ's passion, St. Thomas Aquinas writes (Summa Theologica III q. 47 a. 3 "Whether God the Father delivered up Christ to the Passion?" co.) that

in three respects God the Father did deliver up Christ to the Passion

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    The Calvalry is a Mass, Jesus is the sacrifice and the Abba Father is to whom the sacrifice was offered...my question is, did Jesus presided as the High Priest and he offered himself too as the sacrifice or someone else presided as a priest celebrant? Are you saying the Abba Father is the priest celebrant who offered Jesus to Himself at Calvalry? it's a bit confusiing... – marian agustin Dec 17 '19 at 16:19
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    @marianagustin If you are confused, then why did you accept the answer? Geremia, if you could complete this answer within the frame of the question, as asked, it would certainly help me, and perhaps others, fully understand the point you are trying to make. While brevity is the source of wit, sometimes a bit more explanation is called for. – KorvinStarmast Dec 19 '19 at 13:14
  • @KorvinStarmast If I wont accept an answer, this thread had been marked by Ken Graham for a close down like what happened to my other two questions. What would I do?, I already put Blessed Sheen, CCC1382 and Pope Francis homily that "Calvary is seen as a repeat of Holy Mass by Pope Francis" and yet Ken Graham won't accept this as credible source, he wanted it to be close. – marian agustin Dec 19 '19 at 21:22
  • @marianagustin Once the answer is posted, a question being closed doesn't matter. It can still be accepted, or not, since closing a question does not delete answers. I won't comment on your disagreement with Ken G. – KorvinStarmast Dec 19 '19 at 23:43
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If Calvalry is seen as a Holy Mass and Jesus is the sacrifice then who presided as the priest celebrant?

Calvary was the real immolation of Jesus Christ on the Cross. It is not viewed in Catholicism as a ”Holy Mass”.

Calvary is not a Mass. There is no consecration and no communion. Calvary is the immolation of Jesus Christ upon the Cross. There in no consecration or communions as in a real mass.

There is a need for a clear statement or quote from a Catholic source and it has not been forthcoming in the body of the above question along with its’ linked source.

Catholics view the Mass as the repetition of Christ’s sacrifice on the Cross at Calvary and Christ offered himself the day before in view of the sacrifice at Calvary.

The Catechism of the Catholic Church states what the Mass is as follows and does not call Calvary a mass:

1382The Mass is at the same time, and inseparably, the sacrificial memorial in which the sacrifice of the cross is perpetuated and the sacred banquet of communion with the Lord's body and blood. But the celebration of the Eucharistic sacrifice is wholly directed toward the intimate union of the faithful with Christ through communion. To receive communion is to receive Christ himself who has offered himself for us.

For Catholics, the first ”Mass” was at the Last Supper in which Christ instituted the Eucharist and it was completed the next day at Calvary.

The Holy Mass is the re-presentation of Jesus’ sacrifice on Calvary, in a real liturgical manner. At the Last Supper (also known as the First Eucharist), Jesus created the Mass for each one of us to be present at His great sacrifice, even through time and space. The word “Mass” comes to us from the Latin word “missa” (dismissed, or sent). At the end of the Latin Mass, the priest says, “Ita missa est,” or “Go, you are sent.” The word “Christmas” is an abbreviation for “Christ’s Mass.” Let’s explore why the Mass is what it is, and why it is so important to our salvation.

The Passover meal that Jesus began in the upper room was not finished there. The fourth cup of the Passover meal, the cup of consummation, is not mentioned in the Gospels. The meal broke up after the cup of blessing was drunk and a hymn was sung (Matthew 26). Jesus even said that He would not drink again of the fruit of the vine until later. In the Garden of Gethsemane, he prayed in Matthew 26:39:

“My Father, if it be possible, let this cup pass from me; nevertheless, not as I will, but as thou wilt.”

Finally, on the cross, Jesus drank the sour wine and said in John 19:30: “It is consummated.” The Passover meal that was started in the upper room was finished on the cross, forever tying the Eucharist to the crucifixion of Christ.

The Mass as Sacrifice

It is important to remember that in the Mass, Jesus is both priest and victim. We learn in Hebrews 6:20 that Jesus is a high priest forever, according to the order of Melchizedek. Melchizedek, both the King of Salem (shalom, or peace) and the High Priest, in Genesis 14:18, offered blessed bread and wine to Abraham in honor of his victory over his enemies and the rescue of Lot. After the golden calf incident, priests in the Old Testament belonged to the tribe of Levi, and they offered sacrifices for sin, only they offered animal sacrifices instead of bread and wine. God commanded these animal sacrifices because the Israelites, while slaves in Egypt for 400 years, had begun to imitate the Egyptians and worship cattle, sheep, and goats. By having to kill these former “deities,” the Jews were weaning themselves off of the gods of Egypt. - The Mass: Calvary Made Present for Each Generation

Jesus as our High Priest, offered himself for our redemption.

…26Such a high priest truly befits us—One who is holy, innocent, undefiled, set apart from sinners, and exalted above the heavens. 27Unlike the other high priests, He does not need to offer daily sacrifices, first for His own sins and then for the sins of the people; He sacrificed for sin once for all when He offered up Himself. 28For the law appoints as high priests men who are weak; but the oath, which came after the law, appointed the Son, who has been made perfect forever.… - Hebrews 7:27

Christ in his humanity offered himself as a spotless Victim for our salvation.

Validly ordained priests act in the person of Christ when they say the words of the sacrifice of Mass. It should be noted that Catholic priests do not act in person of the Father when saying the words of the consecration of the Mass. Calvary was accomplished the Jesus Christ, while offering his body as a sacrifice for our humanity while united to God the Father and God the Holy Spirit. The Sacred Trinity was present at Calvary.

In persona Christi is a Latin phrase meaning "in the person of Christ", an important concept in Roman Catholicism and, in varying degrees, to other Christian traditions. A priest is In persona Christi, because he acts as Christ and as God. An extended term, In persona Christi capitis, “in the person of Christ the head,” was introduced in by the bishops of the Vatican Council II in the Decree on the Ministry and Live of Priests, Presbyterorum Ordinis, December 7, 1965.

Roman Catholic understanding

In Roman Catholicism, the priest acts in the person of Christ in pronouncing the words that comprise part of a sacramental rite. For example, in the Mass, the Words of Institution, by which the bread becomes the Body of Christ and the wine becomes the Precious Blood. The priest and bishop act in the person of Christ the head in their leadership of the Church.

Pope Pius XII (1947)

  1. Only to the apostles, and thenceforth to those on whom their successors have imposed hands, is granted the power of the priesthood, in virtue of which they represent the person of Jesus Christ before their people, acting at the same time as representatives of their people before God….
  2. The august sacrifice of the altar, then, is no mere empty commemoration of the passion and death of Jesus Christ, but a true and proper act of sacrifice, whereby the High Priest by an unbloody immolation offers Himself a most acceptable victim to the Eternal Father, as He did upon the cross. “It is one and the same victim; the same person now offers it by the ministry of His priests, who then offered Himself on the cross, the manner of offering alone being different.”

  3. The priest is the same, Jesus Christ, whose sacred Person His minister represents. Now the minister, by reason of the sacerdotal consecration which he has received, is made like to the High Priest and possesses the power of performing actions in virtue of Christ's very person.

Bishops of Vatican Council II (1964)

  1. … Priests, although they do not possess the highest degree of the priesthood, and although they are dependent on the bishops in the exercise of their power, nevertheless they are united with the bishops in sacerdotal dignity. By the power of the sacrament of Orders, in the image of Christ the eternal high Priest, they are consecrated to preach the Gospel and shepherd the faithful and to celebrate divine worship, so that they are true priests of the New Testament. Partakers of the function of Christ the sole Mediator, on their level of ministry, they announce the divine word to all. They exercise their sacred function especially in the eucharistic worship or the celebration of the Mass by which acting in the person of Christ…

  2. At a lower level of the hierarchy are deacons, upon whom hands are imposed “not unto the priesthood, but unto a ministry of service”.

Pope Paul VI (1967)

  1. … acting in the person of Christ, the priest unites himself most intimately with the offering, and places on the altar his entire life, which bears the marks of the holocaust.

Pope John Paul II (1980)

  1. The priest offers the holy Sacrifice in persona Christi… Awareness of this reality throws a certain light on the character and significance of the priest celebrant who, by confecting the holy Sacrifice and acting “in persona Christi,” is sacramentally (and ineffably) brought into that most profound sacredness, and made part of it, spiritually linking with it in turn all those participating in the eucharistic assembly.

Typical Version of the Catechism of the Catholic Church (1997)

875: … No one can bestow grace on himself; it must be given and offered. This fact presupposes ministers of grace, authorized and empowered by Christ. From him, bishops and priests receive the mission and faculty (“the sacred power”) to act in persona Christi Capitis; deacons receive the strength to serve the people of God in the diaconia of liturgy, word, and charity, in communion with the bishop and his presbyterate. The ministry in which Christ's emissaries do and give by God's grace what they cannot do and give by their own powers, is called a “sacrament” by the Church's tradition. Indeed, the ministry of the Church is conferred by a special sacrament.”

Pope Benedict XVI (2007)

Celebrating the Chrism Mass on Holy Thursday with the priests of Rome, Pope Benedict XVI said that priests should prepare themselves thoroughly to celebrate Mass and administer the sacraments, remembering that they act in the person of Christ.

Archbishop Fulton J. Sheen, Ph.D., D.D., LL.D., Litt.D puts it quite nicely the concept of Christ’s supreme sacrifice on the Cross. Jesus offered the first Mass the eve of his Passion. Once the words of consecration were said at the Last Supper, all that remain was for Jesus to complete the immolation on the Cross the next day.

If then Death was the supreme moment for which Christ lived, it was therefore the He wished to have remembered. He did not ask that men should write down His Words into a Scripture; He did not ask that His kindness to the poor should be recorded in history; but He did ask that men remember His Death. And in order that its memory might not be any haphazard narrative on the part of men, He Himself instituted the precise way it should be recalled.

The memorial was instituted the night before He died, at what has since been called "The Last Supper." Taking bread into His Hands, He said: "This is my body, which shall be delivered for you," i.e., delivered unto death. Then over the chalice of wine, He said, "This is my blood of the new testament, which shall be shed for many unto remission of sins." Thus in an unbloody symbol of the parting of the Blood from the Body, by the separate consecration of Bread and Wine, did Christ pledge Himself to death in the sight of God and men, and represent His death which was to come the next afternoon at three. He was offering Himself as a Victim to be immolated, and that men might never forget that "greater love than this no man hash, that a man lay down his life for his friends," He gave the divine command to the Church: "Do this for a commemoration of me."

The following day that which He had prefigured and foreshadowed, He realized in its completeness, as He was crucified between two thieves and His Blood drained from His Body for the redemption of the world.

The Church which Christ founded has not only preserved the Word He spoke, and the wonders He wrought; it has also taken Him seriously when He said: "Do this for a commemoration of me." And that action whereby we re-enact His Death on the Cross the Sacrifice of the Mass, in which we do as a memorial what He did at the Last Supper as the prefiguration of His Passion.

Hence the Mass is to us the crowning act of Christian worship. A pulpit in which the words of our Lord are repeated does not unite us to Him; a choir in which sweet sentiments are sung brings us no closer to His Cross than to His garments. A temple without an altar of sacrifice is non-existent among primitive peoples, and is meaningless among Christians. And so in the Catholic Church the , and not the pulpit or the choir or the organ, is the center of worship, for there is re-enacted the memorial of His Passion. Its value does not depend on him who says it, or on him who hears it; it depends on Him who is the One High Priest and Victim, Jesus Christ our Lord. With Him we are united, in spite of our nothingness; in a certain sense, we lose our individuality for the time being; we unite our intellect and our will, our heart and our soul, our body and our blood, so intimately with Christ, that the Heavenly Father sees not so much us with our imperfection, but rather sees us , the Beloved Son in whom He is well pleased. The Mass is for that reason the greatest event in the history of mankind; the only Holy Act which keeps the wrath of God from a sinful world, because it holds the Cross between heaven and earth, thus renewing that decisive moment when our sad and tragic humanity journeyed suddenly forth to the fullness of supernatural life. - Calvary and the Mass

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  • "He was offering Himself as a Victim to be immolated"...Jesus here is showing and teaching the Apostles the ordained Bshops or Overseer how to offer a "sacramental mass", that's why Jesus said ""Do this for a commemoration of me." In Calvalry, it was totally different as this is not a "sacramental mass" but a "real mass". The offering is a real body, blood, soul & divinity of Jesus Christ Himself...is the Calvalry Mass a "sacramental mass"? No..So, who offered Jesus to the Father in Calvalry? It can be liken to Abraham offering "Isaac". Who represents Abraham? – marian agustin Dec 17 '19 at 22:59
  • @marianagustin Calvary is not a Mass. There is no consecration and no communion. Calvary is the immolation of Jesus Christ upon the Cross. There in no consecration or communions as in a real mass. – Ken Graham Dec 20 '19 at 3:02
  • Ken there's no need for Mary Virgin Priest to consecrate Jesus real body & blood at the Foot of the Cross, it is already the "real presence". For Sacramental Mass the faithful need to receive Holy Communion, but in Calvary, Jesus is the "sacrificial offering". And Jesus said it clearly. "If I am lifted up or offered, I will draw all men to myself. (John12:31-32)..So, in Calvary, Mary was seen standing at the Foot of the Cross, to offer his beloved Son to the Eternal Father, and the Divine Mercy prayer is the perfect words to utter by Mary. Virgin Priest. – marian agustin Dec 21 '19 at 3:01
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Catholic teaching on the question of who, as priest, offered Jesus to the Father on Calvary is explained by the Council of Trent (Session 22) as follows:

"... it was necessary ... that another priest according to the order of Melchisedech ... arise, our Lord Jesus Christ ..... He, therefore, our God and Lord, though He was about to offer Himself once to God the Father upon the altar of the cross by the mediation of death ...."

Similarly, the Catechism of the Council of Trent, says: "We therefore confess that the Sacrifice of the Mass is and ought to be considered one and the same sacrifice as that of the cross, for the victim is one and the same .... The priest also is one and the same, Christ the Lord ...."

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  • Your reference to Council of Trent speaks about "sacramental mass" that is perpetually repeating the Sacrifice offered by Jesus at Calvary. There's no question Jesus willingly offered his life for all of us, but Jesus own words revealed that the Will of the Father is that Jesus must be lifted up in John12:31-32. Who then "lifted up or offered" Jesus sacrificed of himself to the Father? Were not talking about "sacramental mass" but the "real sacrifice" of Jesus at Calvary. – marian agustin Dec 21 '19 at 19:15
  • @marianagustin As far as I can see, "offer Himself once to God the Father upon the altar of the cross" clearly refers to the one specific event that took place on Calvary almost 2000 years ago, not to its sacramental renewal that occurs on all Catholic altars throughout the ages. – Andreas Blass Dec 21 '19 at 19:39
  • The word "the priest is one and the same, Christ the Lord" is only true at the Last Supper, it is a sacramental mass. Jesus acting as the Priest teaches the Apostles how to consecrate the "bread & wine". In Calvary, don;t you think the scene is different from the Last Supper? There's no need for consecration because the real presence of body & blood was there as a "victim to be offer". What is needed is an "offertory prayer" to lift-up Jesus as a pleasing sacrifice. Jesus is Divine Mercy made flesh. Is the Divine Mercy prayer a fitting offertory prayer to Eternal Father uttered by Mary? – marian agustin Dec 22 '19 at 2:45
  • @marianagustin I'll stick with the explicit teaching of Trent rather than your interesting speculations. – Andreas Blass Dec 22 '19 at 2:50
  • Ok, but the way I understant the wordings of your answer does not pertain to Calvary but to the celebration of "sacramental mass". At Calvary Jesus was not acting as a Priest celebrant but a "victim to be offered", just like Abraham and Isaac. We can see that Jesus represent Isaac, but who represent Abraham as the one who will offer to God the sacrifice? I still see Mary standing at the Foot of the Cross is the one who offered or lifted up Jesus to the Eternal Father in union with St.John the beloved and other Mary's present to fulfill John12:31-32. – marian agustin Dec 22 '19 at 6:56
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If Calvalry is seen as a Holy Mass and Jesus is the sacrifice then who presided as the priest celebrant?

ANSWER

St. Pius X acknowledged Mary as a Virgin Priest, and the Litany of Loreto acknowledge the title of Mary as Queen of all Priest, and the Church acknowledge Mary's priesthood is in the order of grace, a royal priesthood.

Since Mary is a Virgin Priest in the order of grace, She can celebrate a "Real Mass", meaning Mary can offer the real body,blood, soul & divinity of his beloved son Jesus Christ to the Eternal Father, and St. Pius XII teaches that indeed Mary had offered Jesus Christ at Golgotha or Calvalry to the Eternal Father.

She, the second Eve, who, free from all sin, original or personal, and always more intimately united with her Son, offered Him on Golgotha to the Eternal Father for all the children of Adam, sin-stained by his unhappy fall."(Pope Pius XII. Mystici corporis Christi, §110, June 29, 1943, Libreria Editrice Vaticana)

Mariology of Pope Pius XII https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mystici_corporis_Christi

The Divine Mercy prayer is most fitting words that Mary can utter at the Foot of the Cross;

Mary's offertory prayers to the Eternal Father would be the Divine Mercy prayer; "Eternal Father I offer Thee the body,blood, soul & divinity of my beloved Son and my Lord Jesus Christ, in atonement for my sins and those of the whole world."

Explanation;

The Calvalry is the bloody celebration of the Holy Mass the real Mass wherein Jesus Christ "body, blood, soul and divinity" had been offered to God the Father as a pleasing and acceptable sacrifice in atonement for the sins of all mankind.

The Last Supper is the first "Sacramental Mass" or the unbloody commemoration of Jesus sacrifice at the foot of the cross.

1382 The Mass is at the same time, and inseparably, the sacrificial memorial in which the sacrifice of the cross is perpetuated and the sacred banquet of communion with the Lord's body and blood. But the celebration of the Eucharistic sacrifice is wholly directed toward the intimate union of the faithful with Christ through communion. To receive communion is to receive Christ himself who has offered himself for us.

It is a Catholic understanding and teachings that Jesus is both the High Priest and the sacrificial offering. But, at the Foot of the Cross unlike the Last Supper Jesus is the one who lifted up the "bread and wine" to become His true "body & blood" upon consecration. The difference is, at Calvalry, Jesus cannot lift himself up like the High Priest although he willingly offered His life as a sacrifice, the question still remain;

Did Jesus presided as the High Priest and also the one who lifted-up himself as an offering or a sacrifice to God the Father? Yes or No?

At Calvalry, we can see the Theotokos the Virgin Priest standing and St.John the beloved an "ordained Bishop" by Jesus Christ and the other Mary's who have no record of ordination into priesthood.

St. John cannot offer Jesus Christ to the Eternal Father because his ordination into priesthood was "sacramental" plus the gifts of the Holy Spirit was not yet conferred on him, it was only conferred at the Upper Room.

Mary is a Virgin Priest, can She offer to Eternal Father the "body, blood, soul and divinity" of Jesus Christ?

Jesus said in scriptures;

Jesus Predicts His Death …Now judgment is upon this world; now the prince of this world will be cast out. And I, when I am lifted up from the earth, will draw all men to Myself.” He said this to indicate the kind of death He was going to die. "(John12:31-33)

Jesus explicitly said; "And I, when I am lifted up from the earth, will draw all men to Myself.”

Would it mean in Calvalry, someone must lift-up Jesus Christ to Eternal Father before his death?

Mary is a Virgin Priest. (St. Pius X; 1906)

Can Mary 'lifted-up or offered" Jesus Christ being the Virgin Priest not according to sacramental priesthood but according to a royal priesthood and in the order of grace? Yes or No?

The answer is Yes, and all of the redeemed can "offer and lifted up" Jesus Christ to Eternal Father as Jesus revealed to St. Faustina the Divine Mercy prayer:

"Eternal Father I offer Thee the body & blood, soul & divinity of our Lord Jesus Christ in atonement for our sins and those of the whole world." (Divine Mercy prayer)

Is there a Catholic Teachings that Mary offered Jesus Christ to Eternal Father?

The answer is Yes, St.Pius XII encyclicals Mystici Corpus stated;

She, the second Eve, who, free from all sin, original or personal, and always more intimately united with her Son, offered Him on Golgotha to the Eternal Father for all the children of Adam, sin-stained by his unhappy fall." (Pope Pius XII. Mystici corporis Christi, §110, June 29, 1943, Libreria Editrice Vaticana)

Mystici corporis Christi (Wikipedia)

To visualize how Mary the Virgin Priest a royal priesthood in the order of grace had "lifted up and offered" Jesus Christ to Eternal Father, this vision is given to Sis. Lucia by Jesus in 1929;

enter image description here

Mary is standing at the Foot of the Cross, not only as the Theotokos but Mary is standing at the Foot of the Cross as a Virgin Priest, a Queen Priestess offering the body, blood, soul and divinity of his beloved Son Jesus Christ as a pleasing and acceptable sacrifice to God in atonement for the sins of all mankind.

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  • NOTE: Pope Francis homily stated this; " This is the Mass: entering into this passion, death, resurrection and ascension of Jesus; when we go to Mass it is as if we were to go to Calvary, the same. But think: if we at the moment of Mass go to Calvary". opusdei.org/en-ph/article/the-mass-means-repeating-calvary – marian agustin Dec 19 '19 at 1:20
  • "In 1906, Pope Pius X approved a prayer which says "Mary, Virgin Priest, pray for us." (emphasis mine). However, a Holy Office decree of 1916 forbade the use of any image that had Mary wearing vestments – some say for fear of the possibilty of an argument for women’s ordination, others that Mary as a priest was a metaphorical image taken too far." - The Priesthood of Mary Pope Pius X did not define her priesthood. It was by association to the sacrifice of her Son. She was never ordained a priest, so no mass was offered. – Ken Graham Dec 19 '19 at 1:35
  • @KenGraham What is forbidden is the use of any "image wearing vestments" and not the "prayer devotion". Mary's ordination was not "sacramental" like the Apostles, this is a mystery and the Theologians had seen the "Mystery of Annunciation" as Mary's ordination into a royal priestess, that's why Archangel Gabriel bow down to acknowledge the Sovereign Queen Mother of the King of Kings the High Priest Jesus Christ who was born thru Mary the Queen of all Priest including Jesus priesthood. They are crowned King & Queen in Heaven as Catechism teaches Mary is Queen over all things.(CCC966) – marian agustin Dec 19 '19 at 1:49
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    Sorry, but the invocation of Queen of all priests is not in the Litanies of Loreto. – Ken Graham Dec 20 '19 at 3:06
  • @KenGraham It's like the Arian heresy, is Mary the Mother of Jesus humanity only? or Mary the Mother of Jesus as person, fully God and fully man? Jesus is the King of Kings, is Mary called by the Church as Queen over all things(CCC966), Queen of all titles stated in Litany of Loreto only, but She is not a Queen of All Priests eventhough the Church proclaimed and Heaven crowned Her as Sovereign Queen of Heaven & Earth? en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Titles_of_Mary – marian agustin Dec 21 '19 at 3:12

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