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Luke 14:25Now large crowds were going along with Him; and He turned and said to them, 26“If anyone comes to Me, and does not hate his own father and mother and wife and children and brothers and sisters, yes, and even his own life, he cannot be My disciple. 27“Whoever does not carry his own cross and come after Me cannot be My disciple. 28“For which one of you, when he wants to build a tower, does not first sit down and calculate the cost to see if he has enough to complete it? 29“Otherwise, when he has laid a foundation and is not able to finish, all who observe it begin to ridicule him, 30saying, ‘This man began to build and was not able to finish.’ 31“Or what king, when he sets out to meet another king in battle, will not first sit down and consider whether he is strong enough with ten thousand men to encounter the one coming against him with twenty thousand? 32“Or else, while the other is still far away, he sends a delegation and asks for terms of peace. 33“So then, none of you can be My disciple who does not give up all his own possessions.

In the above passage, loving God more than anything else is the same as carrying a cross, is the same as paying a huge cost, for the privilege of being a disciple of Christ.

The privilege of being a disciple of Christ is in turn the same as completing a tower, is the same as defeating a strong king. It could be salvation, receiving eternal life or entry to heaven.

The puzzling verse is v32.

Are terms of peace asking for extensions of deadline? Is it delaying the receiving of the benefits of Gospel? Why should the negotiations be with the enemy king?

Similarly, if a person doesn’t have enough money to complete the tower, which can be interpreted to mean enough faith to take on the required amount of good works, since Roman Catholics believe paying a cost means doing good works, does it mean he loses the claim to be a disciple of Christ, which is required for salvation/eternal life/entry to heaven?

Matthew 7:21"Not everyone who says to Me, 'Lord, Lord,' will enter the kingdom of heaven, but he who does the will of My Father who is in heaven will enter.

What is the Roman Catholic Church's views about Luke 14:32?

All Scripture from the NASB.

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Fr. Cornelius à Lapide, S.J.'s commentary on Luke 14:32 says:

Ver. 32.—Or else, while the other is yet a great way off, &c. This verse gives completeness to the parable, but is not to be taken as the teaching of Christ, for we may not bargain with either the evil spirits or our vices; against these we must wage ἄσπονδον πόλεμον, an irreconcileable war.

This verse may however be interpreted in this way—

“He that desires to follow me perfectly in poverty and in the preaching of the gospel, must make an entire surrender of self, and give up parents, friends, and possessions, thus making them enemies.

“But if he see that he has not strength enough for this, let him make conditions of peace with them, and bind himself by the gospel precepts only, leaving for others the counsels of poverty, obedience, and the preaching of salvation. For this is that which Christ would teach, as is clear from the following verse; hence he makes mention of two armies, two leaders, and two banners, one His own, and the other that of Lucifer. Wherefore the Apostles and their successors have need to bear in mind that they are engaged in actual warfare against the devil and his angels.” S. Cyril.

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  • Are terms of peace asking for extensions of deadline? Not answered./ Is it delaying the receiving of the benefits of Gospel? Not answered./ Why should the negotiations be with the enemy king? Not answered./ Similarly, if a person doesn’t have enough money to complete the tower, which can be interpreted to mean enough faith to take on the required amount of good works, since Roman Catholics believe paying a cost means doing good works, does it mean he loses the claim to be a disciple of Christ, which is required for salvation/eternal life/entry to heaven? Not Answered – Seeker Nov 10 '19 at 9:41
  • @Seeker St. Cyril's quote explains that to "make conditions of peace with them" means to "bind himself by the gospel precepts only, leaving for others the counsels of poverty, obedience, and the preaching of salvation." One can be saved by obeying the precepts only; one needn't actually live the counsels of poverty, perfect chastity, and obedience (else only the vowed religious and not marrieds could be saved), although one must not be opposed to the spirit of the evangelical counsels. – Geremia Nov 10 '19 at 22:37
  • I have posted that Protestant Commentaries also give similar interpretations. The fact that they are not used as doctrine is because they cannot be used as reliable references. They are flat out contradicted by passages like this: Luke 14:26“If anyone comes to me and does not hate father and mother, wife and children, brothers and sisters—yes, even their own life—such a person cannot be my disciple. 27And whoever does not carry their cross and follow me cannot be my disciple….33In the same way, those of you who do not give up everything you have cannot be my disciples. – Seeker Nov 11 '19 at 0:50

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