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There are some books considered to be canonical by (some) Eastern Orthodox and Oriental Churches, but not by the Latin Church. E.g. 3+4 Maccabees. The Eastern Catholic Churches kept their own spirtitual heritage despite the union with Rome.

If the canon of the Vulgate is valid for the whole Church as suggested here (after Trent), are there other "traditional" books used in the (liturgies of) Eastern Catholic Churches? What status do they have?

2
  • I edited the question to make it more different from the possible duplicate.
    – K-HB
    Jun 16 '19 at 21:39
  • Is there something incorrect or incomplete about my answer ?
    – Lucian
    Nov 11 at 17:32
-1

On the eve of various orthodox holidays, including – but not restricted to – the twelve great feasts, up to three old testament readings are ascribed, whose main purpose is primarily typological, consisting mostly of biblical passages extracted from the law, prophets, kings, and wisdom literature; the apocryphal or deuterocanonical ones are as follows:

  • Wisdom of Solomon, chapters 2-5 & 10
  • Baruch, chapters 2 & 4
  • Daniel 3 : 24-90 (Prayer of Azaria & Song of the Three Youths)
  • 2 Maccabees 7
  • Psalm 151 & Prayer of Manasseh

— Bishop Bartolomeu Valeriu Anania, Study of the Old Testament for Theological Colleges, page 329, Cluj-Napoca, 2003.

(The last two rows, while not technically paroemiae, serve a liturgical function nonetheless).


A more detailed breakdown is given on page 27 of this PDF:

  • 55 readings from Genesis
  • 20 from Exodus
  • 1 from Leviticus
  • 3 from Numbers
  • 8 from Deuteronomy

  • 3 from Joshua
  • 3 from Judges
  • 9 from 1 Kings
  • 5 from 2 Kings

  • 6 from Job (during Passion Week)
  • 164 from Psalms (including apocryphal)
  • 58 from Proverbs
  • 47 from Wisdom

  • 100 from Isaiah
  • 6 from Jeremiah
  • 4 from Baruch
  • 13 from Ezekiel
  • 2 from Daniel (including apocryphal additions)

  • 3 from Joel
  • 1 from Jonah (all chapters, also during Passion Week)
  • 3 from Micah
  • 1 from Zephaniah
  • 7 from Zechariah
  • 8 from Malachi

As can be easily glimpsed, they don't even cover all canonical books (Ruth, Samuel, Chronicles, Ezra, Nehemiah, Esther, half of the Minor Prophets), let alone deuterocanonical ones (except for Wisdom and apocryphal additions to canonical ones, Baruch being part of Jeremiah).

1
  • Is there something incorrect or incomplete about this answer ?
    – Lucian
    Nov 11 at 17:32

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