1

This is because in Matt. 1:2 the bible said; And Isaac begat Jacob. Then same Matt. 1 verse 15 said; and Matthan begat Jacob. Now, both Jacobs begotten by different parents also begat Josephs. Does this implies there were two (2) Jacobs in the Bible.

Thanks Brethren for anticipated response.

  • Welcome to BHSX. Thanks for this excellent question. Please ensure you take the tour below. – Mac's Musings Mar 4 at 0:08
  • It's good to have your input. If you could bolster your Q with a bit more information, that would be helpful. As it stands, you have actually answered your own Q and people will find it hard to add anything further. If, however, there was a theological point to be made, or a theological problem explored, we would have something worth searching out. I hope you don't mind me commenting as I am not 'brethren', but a sister! (Note to self: avoid the word 'cistern', even as a joke!) – Anne Mar 15 at 15:01
3

By my count there are actually nine people in the Bible called "Jacob", all of them named in the New Testament as follows:

  1. Isaac's second son, twin brother of Esau, and progenitor of Christ (Matt 1:2).
  2. Father of Joseph and grandfather of Jesus (Matt 1:15, 16)
  3. Son of Zebedee and brother of the disciple John (Matt 4:21), usually (and inexplicably) translated "James" in English Bibles but the Greek is "Iakobos".
  4. The son of Alphaeus, one of the 12 disciples (Matt 10:3, Mark 3:18, Luke 6:15, Acts 1:13), usually (and inexplicably) translated "James" in English Bibles but the Greek is "Iakobos".
  5. The Lord Jesus' brother (Matt 13:55, Mark 6:3), usually (and inexplicably) translated "James" in English Bibles but the Greek is "Iakobos".
  6. A church leader at Jerusalem (Acts 12:17, 15:13, 21:18, 1 Cor 15:7, Gal 2:9, 12), usually (and inexplicably) translated "James" in English Bibles but the Greek is "Iakobos". It is highly probably (very likely) that this is the same as the Lord's brother. That is, #6 = #5.
  7. Author of the epistle of "James"; usually (and inexplicably) translated "James in English Bibles but the Greek is "Iakobos". Again, this very likely the Lord's brother.
  8. The son of one of the "Mary's" and a brother of "Joses" (Matt 27:56, Mark 15:40, Luke 24:10), usually (and inexplicably) translated "James" in English Bibles but the Greek is "Iakobos".
  9. The father (not the brother as in KJV) of Judas (not Iscariot), one of the 12; usually (and inexplicably) translated "James" in English Bibles but the Greek is "Iakobos". It is possible that he was the bother of the author of the epistle of "Jude".

That is, "Jacob" was a VERY common name in NT times as numerous inscriptions in Palestine have shown. [Note: I have not included the impersonal "Jacob" meaning the collective noun for all those descended from Jacob, #1 above, see Num 23:21, Is 2:5, etc.]

1

Notice that Matthew 1:2 also says "and Jacob begat Judas and his brethren". Judas is the ancestor of the nation of Judah, whose citizens are called "Judeans" or "Jews" for short.

It happens that one of Jesus's disciples was also called Judas. But despite that, there is no confusion about these two very different Judas's being the same person.

And even today, it would hardly be an amazing coincidence that someone named Jake has a son called Joe.

So why should it be surprising that two completely different people, living nearly 2000 years apart, should share the same name?

0

Three as I can find.

1 Easu's brother Jachob

NWT Genesis 25:26 "After that his brother came out and his hand was holding onto the heel of Esau, so he named him Jacob. Isaac was 60 years old when she gave birth to them."

2 Symbolic of Israel

NWT Micah 1:5 "All of this is because of the revolt of Jacob, Because of the sins of the house of Israel.. . ."

3

NWT Matthew 1:16 "Jacob became father to Joseph the husband of Mary, of whom Jesus was born, who is called Christ."

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.