-2

I am looking for an answer within Catholic doctrine.

Socrates, whom many consider to have undergone Baptism by Desire, had a dialogue about polytheism which I shall paraphrase below:

Socrates: Do you believe that there is an objective set of morals?

Polytheist: Yes.

S: How would you define morals?

P: That which pleases the gods.

S: Do the gods not disagree?

P: Of course they do. [Trojan War, most of Greek mythology, etc.]

S: If they can disagree, then which god does morality please?

P: ...??

Socrates effectively proves that monotheism is the only theism with self-consistent non-relative morality. Atheists can act morally following Kant's Categorical Imperative, but a theist must naturally accept that morality must be defined by the creator(s), and therefore polytheism in which deities disagree cannot be self-consistent.

Why does this not apply to Catholicism? It was a heresy in the early church to say that the Three Persons in One God had only one will, as all people have individual wills, and God has three distinct persons. These wills can disagree, as is the case when Jesus prays to the Father, asking to not be crucified.

I am a high-school student, so please don't assume too much knowledge about biblical philosophy in your answer.

closed as unclear what you're asking by curiousdannii, Ken Graham, KorvinStarmast, Peter Turner Jan 9 at 17:21

Please clarify your specific problem or add additional details to highlight exactly what you need. As it's currently written, it’s hard to tell exactly what you're asking. See the How to Ask page for help clarifying this question. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • Are you specifically asking why Catholics think we should seek God the Father's will above that of God the Son or God the Holy Spirit? Or are you asking why they have separate wills? – Peter Turner Jan 7 at 15:56
  • I do not think "many" Catholics consider Socrates to have had the "baptism of Desire". Some say that "Christ is the Logos of whom the whole race of men partake. Those who lived according to the Logos are Christians, even if they were considered atheists [but not really atheists], such as, among the Greeks, Socrates and Heraclitus (First Apology, 1.46)." But this question is more philosophical in nature than true Catholic doctrine. (Source: THE BAPTISM OF DESIRE. Baptism of Desire requires knowledge of Jesus Christ. – Ken Graham Jan 7 at 16:05
  • "It was a heresy in the early church to say that the Three Persons in One God had only one will, as all people have individual wills, and God has three distinct persons." Got a reference for that? One divine will has been taught since Gregory of Nazianzus, and the two wills of Christ was fully endorsed in 681. – curiousdannii Jan 7 at 21:41
  • You have a wrong premise in your question. These wills can disagree clean that up and this question has a chance. – KorvinStarmast Jan 9 at 13:05