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In Is Transhumanism a Challenge or an Opportunity for the Christian Faith? the following statements are made (emphasis mine):

Yet, by painting Transhumanism as an offshoot of atheistic naturalism, he misses an opportunity to see how it can enter into a fruitful dialogue with Christianity. What do I mean by that? Well, If Christianity and Transhumanism both preach transformation of humans into an elevated ideal state, could there be parallels among them that are worth exploring? For centuries Christianity has preached spiritual transformation as humans are shaped into the God-human Christ. Can technology be part of this transformation? Can the transformation of individuals and communities include technology, to enact here a picture of the coming kingdom of God?

Is there a biblical basis for the claim that "humans are shaped into the God-human Christ"? Is this claim consistent with Protestant theology? The author appears to be a Protestant based on the information provided in their bio.


Addendum and clarification:

I should have provided additional context with respect to the perceived parallels between the kind of transformation of humanity that transhumanism seeks to achieve and the spiritual transformation mentioned above. These excerpts may provide clarity:

In the late 19th century, a Russian Orthodox ascetic named Nikolai Fedorov was inspired by Darwinism to argue that humans could direct their own evolution to bring about the resurrection. Up to this point, natural selection had been a random phenomenon, but now, thanks to technology, humans could intervene in this process. Calling on biblical prophecies, he wrote: “This day will be divine, awesome, but not miraculous, for resurrection will be a task not of miracle but of knowledge and common labour.”

This theory was carried into the 20th century by Pierre Teilhard de Chardin, a French Jesuit priest and palaeontologist who, like Fedorov, believed that evolution would lead to the Kingdom of God. In 1949, Teilhard proposed that in the future all machines would be linked to a vast global network that would allow human minds to merge. Over time, this unification of consciousness would lead to an intelligence explosion – the “Omega Point” – enabling humanity to “break through the material framework of Time and Space” and merge seamlessly with the divine. The Omega Point is an obvious precursor to Kurzweil’s Singularity, but in Teilhard’s mind, it was how the biblical resurrection would take place. Christ was guiding evolution toward a state of glorification so that humanity could finally merge with God in eternal perfection.1

And

As we continue to advance technologically, it is rational for us to to expect that such progress in only going to increase in speed and complexity. Anti-aging technologies are going to be invented. Radical life extension is going to become a reality. It is possible too that, by way of the Singularity, technological immortality may even be achieved.

These advancements should provide hope for Christians because, in a very tangible way, they represent the reality of the Christian belief that God, through Christ, has begun the process of redeeming humanity and all of Creation. Now, as we share in Christ’s invitation to aid in this renewal and restoration of humanity and the world, we too potentially have the privilege of assisting God in bringing this new deathless reality to fruition as well. As such, Christians should begin to be intent in aiding and empowering technologists with the formational tools that will encourage their work to be for the good of all humanity. In so doing – one day – Christians may be able to fully realize the early church’s hope of never having to face death.2

In other words, exists the view among some Christians that to the Christian, technology may represent the means by which certain goods (crudely speaking, eternal life and new, superior bodies) may be attained, which at least superficially is similar to some of the goals of transhumanism (immortality, superior bodies). This is the thinking no doubt underpinning the following statement:

"Well, If Christianity and Transhumanism both preach transformation of humans into an elevated ideal state, could there be parallels among them that are worth exploring?"

If it is believed that the goals and the means by which to achieve them are similar between Christianity and Transhumanism, it may change the way we understand the following statements:

For centuries Christianity has preached spiritual transformation as humans are shaped into the God-human Christ. Can technology be part of this transformation? Can the transformation of individuals and communities include technology, to enact here a picture of the coming kingdom of God?

It is in this context that I am asking about the claim that "humans are shaped into the God-human Christ". My goal is to understand as best as possible how this claim could be justified by scripture - if at all - in light of the fact that it is being directly compared with and discussed in the same vein as Transhumanism.


  1. God in the machine: my strange journey into transhumanism

  2. The Singularity: Christianity’s New Eschatological Hope

  • I have never found any information whatsoever in the bible (I mean the 66 books Genesis to Revelation) about the above subject, and I have been reading that book since about 1960 or so. There is information about the Resurrection of the body of those who have died. And those who are alive at that time shall be 'changed'. Is that what you are asking ? – Nigel J Oct 15 '18 at 16:36
  • @NigelJ Thank you for your interest. I edited my post in an attempt to be more clear. – julian Oct 16 '18 at 3:47
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Yes, the Bible teaches that we are to be conformed into the image of Christ:

Romans 8:29: For those God foreknew he also predestined to be conformed to the image of his Son, that he might be the firstborn among many brothers and sisters.

1 Corinthians 15:49: And just as we have borne the image of the earthly man, so shall we bear the image of the heavenly man.

2 Corinthians 3:18: And we all, who with unveiled faces contemplate the Lord’s glory, are being transformed into his image with ever-increasing glory, which comes from the Lord, who is the Spirit.

Philippians 3:21: who, by the power that enables him to bring everything under his control, will transform our lowly bodies so that they will be like his glorious body.

In the new creation God's people will be renewed and remade: primarily freeing us from the power of sin, but also physically, healing any injury and allowing us to avoid all future harm. We will share in Christ's incorruptibility.

But this has nothing to do with transhumanism. I don't think it's a good comparison. People have been augmenting their bodies for millennia. But we're still sinful, corrupt and corruptible human. There's no "elevated state" without resurrection and freedom from sin.

  • +1. I edited my post to provide some background information on why it is believed by the author that comparisons with transhumanism may be valid and relevant. Thank you. – julian Oct 16 '18 at 3:49
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We start attaining Divine nature as we grow in faith, thus partaking of the nature of Christ who is a perfect Divine being yet fully Human.

2 Peter 1:2-4 Grace and peace be multiplied unto you through the knowledge of God, and of Jesus our Lord, According as his divine power hath given unto us all things that pertain unto life and godliness, through the knowledge of him that hath called us to glory and virtue: Whereby are given unto us exceeding great and precious promises: that by these ye might be partakers of the divine nature, having escaped the corruption that is in the world through lust.

As we grow in the Knowledge of God, as we claim the mighty promises given us in His word, we partake of the Divine Nature and become more and more Christ-like.

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