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What is the original language that each of these books were written in?

Genesis, Exodus, Leviticus, Numbers, Deuteronomy, Joshua, Judges, Ruth, 1 Samuel, 2 Samuel, 1 Kings, 2 Kings, 1 Chronicles, 2 Chronicles, Ezra, Nehemiah, Esther, Job, Psalms, Proverbs, Ecclesiastes, Song of Solomon, Isaiah, Jeremiah, Lamentations, Ezekiel, Daniel, Hosea, Joel, Amos, Obadiah, Jonah, Micah, Nahum, Habakkuk, Zephaniah, Haggai, Zechariah, Malachi, Tobit, Judith, Greek Esther, Wisdom of Solomon, Sirach, Baruch, Letter of Jeremiah, Song of Three Youths, Susanna, Bel and the Dragon, 1 Maccabees, 2 Maccabees, 1 Esdras, Prayer of Manasseh, Psalm 151, 3 Maccabees, 2 Esdras, 4 Maccabees, Odes, Psalms of Solomon, Epistle to the Laodiceans, Matthew, Mark, Luke, John, Acts, Romans, 1 Corinthians, 2 Corinthians, Galatians, Ephesians, Philippians, Colossians, 1 Thessalonians, 2 Thessalonians, 1 Timothy, 2 Timothy, Titus, Philemon, Hebrews, James, 1 Peter, 2 Peter, 1 John, 2 John, 3 John, Jude, Revelation

(list here and here)

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    You could just google. The Old Testment are written in Hebrew. The New in Greek. – pehkay Oct 7 '18 at 13:21
  • @pehkay the Greek Esther was obviously not written in Hebrew. – Matt Gutting Oct 7 '18 at 13:37
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    @pehkay It is more complicated than just Hebrew and Greek as the original Scriptural languages! – Ken Graham Oct 7 '18 at 15:32
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    Canonical NT books are all Koine Greek. Canonical OTbooks are Hebrew. Some parts of Daniel (2:4 to 7:28) are written in Chaldee. [Note : Aramaic is another dialect of Hebrew resulting from Hebrew-speaking Jews being influenced by Chaldee in Babylon.] – Nigel J Oct 7 '18 at 18:29
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    @NigelJ Of all Semitic languages the Aramaic is most closely related to the Hebrew, and forms with it, and possibly with the Assyrian, the northern group of Semitic languages. Aramaic, nevertheless, was considered by the ancient Hebrews as a foreign tongue; and a hundred years before the Babylonian exile it was understood only by people of culture in Jerusalem. (Source) – Ken Graham Oct 7 '18 at 20:51
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The answer is in this page. In terms of your list, divided by their relation to Old and New testament (see commentary on canon below) the languages are:

Old Testament

  • Hebrew:

Genesis, Exodus, Leviticus, Numbers, Deuteronomy, Joshua, Judges, Ruth, 1 Samuel, 2 Samuel, 1 Kings, 2 Kings, 1 Chronicles, 2 Chronicles, Ezra, Nehemiah, Esther, Job, Psalms, Proverbs, Ecclesiastes, Song of Solomon, Isaiah, Jeremiah, Lamentations, Ezekiel, Daniel, Hosea, Joel, Amos, Obadiah, Jonah, Micah, Nahum, Habakkuk, Zephaniah, Haggai, Zechariah, Malachi, Tobit, Judith, Sirach, Baruch, 1 Maccabees

  • Aramaic:

Ezra, Jeremiah, Daniel, Tobit

  • Koine Greek:

1 Esdras, Greek Esther, Wisdom of Solomon, Letter of Jeremiah, Song of Three Youths, Susanna, Bel and the Dragon, 2 Maccabees, Prayer of Manasseh, Psalm 151, 3 Maccabees, 4 Maccabees, Odes, Psalms of Solomon

New Testament

  • Koine Greek:

Odes, Epistle to the Laodiceans, Matthew, Mark, Luke, John, Acts, Romans, 1 Corinthians, 2 Corinthians, Galatians, Ephesians, Philippians, Colossians, 1 Thessalonians, 2 Thessalonians, 1 Timothy, 2 Timothy, Titus, Philemon, Hebrews, James, 1 Peter, 2 Peter, 1 John, 2 John, 3 John, Jude, Revelation

Notes:

  • Your list includes overlapping books, i.e. books that belong to one single books in a given canon but are separated under another. Some books do not belong to any canon. See link above for details on some canons.
  • Most of OT Greek texts are found in the Septuagint or later texts, and thus are in Koine Greek.
  • 1 Esdras is a Greek version of Book of Ezra, which was written in Hebrew.
  • Fragments of Tobit have been found in both Aramaic and Hebrew.
  • The Greek Esther is a version of Esther found in the Septuagint, which contains additional text not found in the Hebrew version.
  • The Letter of Jeremiah has only been found written in Greek, but might have also been written in Hebrew or Aramaic.
  • Song of Three Youths, Susanna, and Bel and the Dragon are additions to the Book of Daniel found in the Septuagint.
  • The original 1 Maccabees in Hebrew is lost. Only the Greek version of the Septuagint survives.
  • The Prayer of Manasseh refers to the Greek text found in some versions of the Septuagint and Jerome's Vulgata. There is also a Hebrew book of the same name but different content discovered among the Dead See Scrolls. The location of this text varies according to the canon (not all canons include it though; see reference).
  • Some Hebrew verses from which the Greek Psalm 151 might have been produced were discovered among the Dead See Scrolls.
  • The Book of Odes is a collection of texts from both the OT and the NT, in Greek.
  • Copies of the Psalms of Solomon are only known in Greek, and do not belong to any canon. However, they were probably written in Hebrew or Aramaic.
  • The Epistle to the Laodiceans is lost, but given that its authorship was attributed to Paul, this was most likely written in Greek (as his other letters).
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In the Old Testament, there are four major divisions of books. The first division is the Pentateuch, which comprises Genesis, Exodus, Leviticus, Numbers, and Deuteronomy.

The second division is called the Historical Books and includes twelve writings: Joshua, Judges, Ruth, 1 and 2 Samuel, 1 and 2 Kings, 1 and 2 Chronicles, Ezra, Nehemiah, and Esther.

The third division is called the Poetical Books (or Wisdom Books) and contains Job, Psalms, Proverbs, Ecclesiastes, and the Song of Solomon (or Song of Songs).

The fourth division is called the Prophetic Books and includes five Major Prophets (Isaiah, Jeremiah, Lamentations, Ezekiel, and Daniel) and twelve Minor Prophets (Hosea, Joel, Amos, Obadiah, Jonah, Micah, Nahum, Habakkuk, Zephaniah, Haggai, Zechariah, and Malachi).

They were all written in Hebrew.

The books of the New Testament were written in Aramaic and Greek.

The article in the link below lists the names of the men who wrote these books, along the approximate dates: https://www.gotquestions.org/Bible-authors.html

Correction: The books of the New Testament were written in Koine (common) Greek, although after the time of Jesus and the Apostles copies were made in Aramaic.

  • You left out several of the books mentioned, all of which are considered canonical and inspired by at least one Christian denomination. – Matt Gutting Oct 7 '18 at 13:35
  • The NT was not written in Aramaic, but small parts of the OT were. – curiousdannii Oct 7 '18 at 13:55
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    @Matt Gutting – Tobit was written in Aramaic, Judith in Hebrew, 1st Maccabees in Hebrew and 2nd Maccabees in Greek. I’m struggling to find any information on eight of the Intertestamantal books listed, some of which I never knew existed. My omission is through lack of knowledge, but I’m looking into it. Perhaps someone better informed will provide an answer. – Lesley Oct 7 '18 at 14:25
  • @curiousdannii - Ah, yes - my mistake. I'm now trying to find out which OT books were written in Aramaic. – Lesley Oct 7 '18 at 14:26
  • The "extra" books from the Septuagint were written in Greek, but some of them are believed to have Hebrew originals. The epistle to the Laodiceans is not in any Bibles as far as I know, presumably it is Greek. Matthew is said to have been written in Hebrew (or Aramaic) originally, but we only have the Greek version. – disciple Oct 12 '18 at 4:27

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