4

I'm trying to learn to use a physical breviary. So far it's been pretty smooth sailing, but today (Sunday Nov 12) has been a disaster. I try to compare what I'm praying from the breviary with what it tells me to pray on the Laudate app on my phone, just to confirm that I'm navigating the book correctly. Today to my horror all the psalms were completely different and many of the other prayers too. Apparently it's the Feast Day of St. Martin and this is reason enough to interrupt the weekly cycle of psalms.

Furthermore, while I was going through the pages I came to a direction which reads as follows:

Next, in choir, the Martyrology is read; and it is appropriate to do this outside of choir also.

I am completely clueless as to where I am supposed to find this martyrology in my breviary. The Laudate app provides it in full, but I would like to know where to find it in my physical book.

I'm praying the traditional divine office (pre-Vatican 2 reforms) and the breviary I'm using is the one published by Baronius press. Would anyone happen to have any pointers as to which page I'm supposed to be looking at to find this elusive martyrology?

The contents page of the breviary looks roughly like this:

Ordinary - Constant part
Ordinary - Variable part
Psalter
Common of Saints
Office of the dead
The gradual psalms
The seven penitential psalms
Litany of the saints

Proper of the season
Homilies and collects for sundays
Proper of the saints
2

The Breviary and the Roman Martyrology are two separate books. In the Pre- Vatican II Divine Office the Martyrology was read at the conclusion of Prime. The reading of the Martyrology is added to the Office of Prime and is not an essential part of it. Thus the reading of the Roman Martyrology can be dispensed with.

The Feast of St. Martin for the universal Church is November 11 and not November 12. However if the "Laudate App" is originated from a diocese from which the Feast of St. Martin has been transferred to the 12th of November and is ranked as a major feast (solemnity) then all the Psalms would reflect this.

At worst, the App has made a typo in its' assessment of the Divine Office for this day.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy