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Anything is welcome, but I would prefer something in accordance with Catholic theology.

I think I already know the answer but perhaps I am wrong, and I'm sure many Christians are wondering. I've been noticing that saints do miracles especially when canonization is on stand-by but then afterwards they tone it down. I'm guessing it has something to do with the importance of canonization but also their merits as saints.

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    I am rather skeptical of your claim. Have you tried collecting any empirical data to substantiate this perceived decline? – bradimus Oct 28 '17 at 1:03
  • Gotcha, give me some time to get something acceptable together. My observations have mainly come from the fact that you hear most about the miracles at the stand-by for canonization. Afterwards it always seems the attention fades away even when you try to look up stuff. But I'll see if I can get something together. But if it was the case, how would you answer the question? – Destynation Y Oct 28 '17 at 1:20
  • First let's see if it is the case, so that we can deal with something other than pure speculation. – Matt Gutting Oct 28 '17 at 1:41
  • I suspect that miracles are publicised more when there is an active Cause. Lack of publicity (after canonisation) does not necessarily mean they don't happen. – Andrew Leach Oct 28 '17 at 11:37
  • Rome sometimes publishes the miracle accepted for a canonization, but not always. Who knows how many Rome looked at? Besides that there is no data bank for gathering claims of miracles. Lourdes is an exception and all claims are investigated by a board of doctors. – Ken Graham Oct 28 '17 at 11:39
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Rome sometimes publishes the miracle accepted for a canonization, but not always. Who knows how many Rome looked at? Besides that there is no data bank for gathering claims of miracles. Lourdes is an exception and all claims are investigated by a board of doctors.

Here is a list of approved miracles of Lourdes. Almost 7,000 cures have been documented at the waters of Lourdes. The Church has vigorously investigated and validated a mere 67 of them.

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    I personally know of a miracle that Pope St. John Paul II refused to publish and use a miracle for a beatification because he did not want the communist government to persecute the family involved. The miracle in question was the regrowth of the amputated legs of a young girl. The family to this day desires privacy. – Ken Graham Oct 28 '17 at 13:38
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Miracles are usually performed to further the glorification of God and aid in the conversion of protestants and atheists to Catholicism. Canonization, is merely a process of RECOGNITION that a person is in Heaven. Many are saints but are not recognized. Saints who are recognized are remarkable outstanding people that affected many people or that many people witnessed. Therefore, if that person who worshiped God was proven to be in heaven, that would mean that their lives should be used as an example for others. That is why the canonization is so important for the greater glorification of God.

  • However, the question doesn't ask why canonization is important, nor why miracles are important. It asks why saints perform fewer miracles over time (if that is the case). Since your question doesn't actually answer the question asked, it will be deleted. – Lee Woofenden Oct 28 '17 at 13:41
  • "Miracles are usually performed to further the glorification of God and aid in the conversion of protestants and atheists to Catholicism. " -- I would have thought that easing human suffering factored in there somewhere. – bradimus Oct 28 '17 at 13:51
  • The author of the question stated: "I'm guessing it has something to do with the importance of canonization but also their merits as saints." I was merely reaffirming that. – Max Oct 28 '17 at 15:45

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