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Matthew 16:28 says:

Verily I say unto you, There be some standing here, which shall not taste of death, till they see the Son of man coming in his kingdom.

Mark 9:1 says:

And he said unto them, Verily I say unto you, That there be some of them that stand here, which shall not taste of death, till they have seen the kingdom of GOD come with power.

Luke 9:27 says:

But I tell you of a truth, there be some standing here, which shall not taste of death, till they see the kingdom of GOD.

These three verses have the same meaning, but I don't know who shall not taste of death. What is meaning of these verses? Is anyone still alive from above mentioned persons or is this mention people's spiritual life or disciple of Jesus?

closed as off-topic by curiousdannii, Nathaniel Aug 9 '17 at 11:24

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    According to whom? Different Christian groups understand these verses differently. You need to specify a denomination, tradition, or theology just as you would specify a programming language on StackOverflow. – bradimus Aug 5 '17 at 16:22
  • Jehovah's Witnesses believe those verses refer to Jesus' transfiguration before Peter, James, and John. – 4castle Aug 5 '17 at 16:30
  • @bradimus just tell me your suggestion I want to know theologically and also spiritual meaning of the verses – Udhay Titus Aug 5 '17 at 16:38
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    Some Christians believe that the "kingdom of God coming with power" refers to the transfiguration, or the day of Pentecost, both of which could have several living witnesses. Others believe that the kingdom of God coming with power refers to Jesus Christ's second coming, and that the apostle John is the one who will not taste of death until then. – Samuel Bradshaw Aug 7 '17 at 4:16
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    It’s absurd that this question was closed as off-topic. – Albert Renshaw Nov 30 '18 at 1:44
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These verses are clearly showing how he believed to be living in the Jewish messianic era, and that all of the prophecies would happen before those people died.

(Mark 23:29-31 "Even so, when you see these things happening, you know that it is near, right at the door.Truly I tell you, this generation will certainly not pass away until all these things have happened. Heaven and earth will pass away, but my words will never pass away"

In this verse, just like the ones you quoted, he's reassuring the people around him that everything is going to happen soon. That they can expect it all to happen within there lifetime. Because Judaism doesn't have an installment plan for messianic prophecies. If someone doesn't finish the job and dies without doing them, Judaism gives up all hope on that person being messiah and that's what Jesus is saying isn't the case with him. That he was going to take care of all of it very soon before they die.

Are they still alive? No... they all died out.

  • That was my initial reaction too - it looked like a demonstrably untrue prediction of Jesus's. But the Gospel of Matthew was pieced together by the 2nd generation of Christians (at least this is the scholarly consensus I believe). When composing Matthew they would already have known that the second coming had not occurred. So either they thought that some first-generation Christians were still around at that point, or they must have thought it meant something a bit different. – Stephen Feb 18 at 1:55
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The Answer of "who" is found by cross referencing John 8:51

Most assuredly, I say to you, if anyone keeps My word he shall never see death.

The "how" is answered later in john 11:25-25

25 Jesus said to her, “I am the resurrection and the life. He who believes in Me, though he may die, he shall live. 26 And whoever lives and believes in Me shall never die. Do you believe this?”

So i think this is one place where the specific wording is very important, Jesus promises the believer will not "Taste" death. or "see" death. Taste is used sometimes as a metaphor for "Intimate experience with".

So while Believers bodies will die, we will not "Taste" death. there will be no experience of "deadness" or "being dead". or as the old testament calls it, we will not be stuck "In the place of the dead". (sheol)

Just like the ancient Israelites we will be "Passed Over" by the Spirit of Death, having the Blood of the Lamb as our covering.

Also good to note that the Apostle Peter, in 2 Peter 1:16-17

16 For we did not follow cunningly devised fables when we made known to you the power and coming of our Lord Jesus Christ, but were eyewitnesses of His majesty. 17 For He received from God the Father honor and glory when such a voice came to Him from the Excellent Glory: “This is My beloved Son, in whom I am well pleased.”

So here, Peter, who knows he will die for Christ (John 21- a great reference for this topic.) Explains that he is an eye witness of the coming of Christ, he counts himself as already having seen the glory to come, because of the brief previews he got during the transfiguration, and the voice from heaven.

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It is widely held that Jesus was referring to his coming Transfiguration in which he talked to Moses, Elijah, and God Almighty. It is not just Jehovah's Witnesses that believe that interpretation.

The wording can be confusing, but keep in mind, when Jesus was on this Earth, nobody every fully saw who Jesus is. God Almighty had to shield Jesus' glory. According to the Bible, Jesus' glory will be what lights the world when this earth and world is destroyed and God creates a new heaven and a new earth. There will be no sun or stars. We have the sun to give us light now; Jesus's glory will replace the sun as our constant light. There will be no night time, as Jesus's glory will shine constantly. Revelation 21:23, 22:5, Zechariah 14:6-7, and other scriptures on this topic.

One must read the Zechariah scripture very carefully and fully understand the context to correctly interpret it.

The point is that who Jesus really is and was was never seen. The Transfiguration was the closest anyone came to see who Jesus really is. Jesus certainly didn't mean that some of his disciples are still alive now like they were then. Jesus was basically saying that some of his followers would see his glory before dying. Most of them would have to die before they got to see his glory, which would be many years a way.

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    May I ask, which denomination(s) teach what is in your second paragraph? From my understanding, those verses are both discussing spiritual Jerusalem, not the whole earth. – 4castle Aug 6 '17 at 16:28
  • The scripture from Zechariah doesn't make mention of light coming from God, so I don't understand its relevance. (In fact, it describes the day of Armageddon as being completely dark.) The Bible often uses light to represent truth. – 4castle Aug 6 '17 at 16:44
  • I do not have any interest in what denominations teach. I stated what the Bible teaches and reveals. I don't believe any of that refers to some theoretical "spiritual Jerusalem". The Bible clearly reveals through multiple prophets and prophecies that God will create a new world and a new earth. Jesus's glory will provide the light for that world. We will have physical bodies in that new world. It will not be just a spiritual world. – Paul Turner Aug 6 '17 at 18:28
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    I'm not trying to be rude, but the entire point of this site is to discover what denominations teach. We can't handle the truth. Answers on this site need to clarify what Christian perspective the answer comes from. This site has no interest in determining who is right and who is wrong, it is purely an academic study of Christianity. – 4castle Aug 6 '17 at 18:40
  • Its not the Zechariah verse that says Christ will be the light, its the Rev 21:23 he put also. the Verse says depending on translations that the Glory of God is the "Light" and the lamb is the "Lamp". Compare this to psalm 119:105 "Your word is a lamp for my feet, a light on my path." Also prov 6:23 "For this command is a lamp, this teaching is a light". Now cross all this with 2 pet 1:19 "And so we have the prophetic word confirmed,[a] which you do well to heed as a light that shines in a dark place, until the day dawns and the morning star rises in your hearts – L1R Aug 9 '17 at 20:14

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