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James 5:15 says that the prayer of faith will save the sick. Is there a specific prayer of faith?

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The verse is not referring to any specific prayer, but rather to the prayer of faith (ευχη της πιστεως) as opposed to prayer that is undertaken without faith. For this reason James emphasizes a verse later:

The entreaty of a righteous man hath much strength

He further provides Elijah as an example (v.17-18):

Elijah was a man subject to like passions as we are, and he prayed earnestly that it might not rain: and it rained not on the earth by the space of three years and six months. And he prayed again, and the heaven gave rain, and the earth brought forth her fruit.

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  • +1 that is the correct context. My answer was written in relation to the question before it was edited and the context in which it was asked which is the healing of the sick. It seemed to suggest that reciting a specific "Prayer of Faith" as the OP put it, would in turn heal a person. This is just not Biblically correct and, more importantly, taking the emphasis off God as the One who heals. – jlaverde Mar 9 '17 at 14:57
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The prayer of faith is not the "Prayer of Faith". This means, that there is not a specific prayer that a person can recite in order to heal someone else. God listens to His children. And He answers according to His will and to the measure of faith of the person asking. This is the prayer of faith that James is talking about.

A prayer is not something to be repeated without understanding, as Jesus said in His template of a prayer, now known as the Lord's Prayer; which oddly enough is repeated today throughout the world without understanding and just as vain repetition.

It can be found in Matthew 6:

7 And when you pray, do not use vain repetitions as the heathen do. For they think that they will be heard for their many words.

8 “Therefore do not be like them. For your Father knows the things you have need of before you ask Him. 9 In this manner, therefore, pray:

Our Father in heaven, Hallowed be Your name. 10 Your kingdom come. Your will be done On earth as it is in heaven. 11 Give us this day our daily bread. 12 And forgive us our debts, As we forgive our debtors. 13 And do not lead us into temptation, But deliver us from the evil one. For Yours is the kingdom and the power and the glory forever. Amen.[c]

Prayer is meant to bring you in communion with God. It is meant to grow your faith and relationship with the Father and Christ. It is not to let God know something, as He already knows.

Steps to Christ p. 93

Prayer is the opening of the heart to God as to a friend. Not that it is necessary in order to make known to God what we are, but in order to enable us to receive Him. Prayer does not bring God down to us, but brings us up to Him.

When Jesus was upon the earth, He taught His disciples how to pray. He directed them to present their daily needs before God, and to cast all their care upon Him. And the assurance He gave them that their petitions should be heard, is assurance also to us.

For further information of prayer, I encourage you to read this small e-book:

https://www.amazingfacts.org/media-library/book/e/50/t/teach-us-to-pray

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    which oddly enough is repeated today throughout the world without understanding and just as vain repetition Speak for yourself. You have earned a -1 for making an unsupported assertion. Which is too bad, since I find this to be perfect: Prayer is meant to bring you in communion with God. It is meant to grow your faith and relationship with the Father and Christ. It is not to let God know something, as He already knows. – KorvinStarmast Mar 8 '17 at 18:27
  • We know who you're looking at, and that's not what this site is for, that is, hitting other Christian groups with clubs. – fгedsbend Mar 8 '17 at 23:20
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    I downvoted the answer because I didn't feel it was the correct interpretation of James 5:15. As a member of the Christian confession with perhaps the largest collection of service books, I don't necessarily disagree with the statement about "vain repetition". It is a helpful reminder. I would just say than "repetition" is not synonymous with "vain repetition". Some people wrongly (in my opinion) equate formally recited prayers with "vain repetition". If this were the case, then the entire Book of Psalms should be taken out of the Bible. – guest37 Mar 9 '17 at 5:10
  • @KorvinStarmast Hello friend. Are you saying you've never seen this done? My family and my wife's family have done this for generations. Movies and TV shows have repeated this, and it is not because it never happens, but because it is proliferated. The fact that it's done as penance I find even more problematic. It's almost like forgiveness by repetition. – jlaverde Mar 9 '17 at 14:12
  • @fredsbend hello Fred. I am not seeking to attack a religion here, or the people in it. I am simply pointing out something that is as it shouldn't be, regardless of religion. Is it more prolific in some religions? Yes, so I understand your concern, nevertheless, if I am in a position to show someone what the Word of God says of the subject, it is my duty to do so. Sin is also when a good man sees wrong and does nothing. – jlaverde Mar 9 '17 at 14:15

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