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Okay so I was looking around on google for some answers about where some of the demon names that are "Biblical" came from, and I came across the Testament of Solomon. It isn't in the Bible from what I can tell. (It may be, if so, can I have some references?). It is an account of how Solomon enslaved demons using Michael's ring and made them rebuild the temple. There's something about all of this that just feels off. Does anyone know if its considered true by the majority or if its just considered untrue?

  • Welcome to Christianity.SE. For a quick overview, please take the Site Tour. I edited your question a bit to clarify some of the wording and to add a link to the Wikipedia page on the Testament of Solomon. However, it's somewhat unclear exactly what you're asking. In the title you ask if this text is "Evangelical." In the body you ask for some light on it. What, exactly, do you want to know? If you can clarify your question further, it will have a better chance of lasting here and getting good answers. – Lee Woofenden Jan 11 '17 at 20:32
  • @LeeWoofenden thank you Lee, I did go back and change it some so it's a bit clearer now :D – Tyler The Hero Jan 11 '17 at 20:37
  • The Wikipedia page you've linked to seems to summarise pretty well scholar's thoughts on its age and origin. It's pretty clear that the vast majority of Christians do not think it is scripture (inspired by God.) Do you want to change your question to ask if any Christian groups think it is inspired? – curiousdannii Jan 12 '17 at 2:27
  • @curiousdannii sorry, i didnt link the page, lee did, but thank you. I wont worry about editing it – Tyler The Hero Jan 12 '17 at 2:35
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    If you had looked it up in Wikipedia and followed the link to Pseudepigrapha, you would have your answer. I'm pretty sure no substantial group of Christians considers the book a source of reliable information. – Bit Chaser Jan 12 '17 at 5:39
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In broad strokes, the term "Biblical" gets used in one of two senses:

  1. Content included in or coming directly from the canon of the Bible.
  2. Something that is in essential agreement with what the Bible teaches about a subject.

The so called Testament of Solomon is Biblical in neither of these senses. It is not included in anybody's canon (not the Jews, Catholics, Protestants, any of the Orthodox churches, or any of the more recent denominations). In other words no branch of Christianity considers the work authoritative. Additionally its content directly contradicts the Biblical narrative of the same events on many points.

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    @Caleb just to be snarky, the Catholic and Greek Orthodox Canons came first -- with 73 books -- and the Protestant (revision?) removed books for canon (for the reasons known to those who've looked into the matter). It seems a little backwards to describe it as you did. (I am not trying to start a denomination war, good sir, just pointing out the order of operations). – KorvinStarmast Jan 12 '17 at 20:57
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If you Read the scriptures 1 King you will see that it does not cross reference to God's word and the scriptures. As King Solomon hired 30,000 men to cut the cedar and fir from Lebonon, Sending 10,000 a month. Then he hired 40,000 -men to hewed the stone. So that is alot of man power to build the temple. Not demon power. Always goes back to scripture to confirm the word of God.

5:10 So Hiram gave Solomon cedar trees and fir trees according to all his desire.

5:11 And Solomon gave Hiram twenty thousand measures of wheat for food to his household, and twenty measures of pure oil: thus gave Solomon to Hiram year by year.

5:12 And the LORD gave Solomon wisdom, as he promised him: and there was peace between Hiram and Solomon; and they two made a league together.

5:13 And king Solomon raised a levy out of all Israel; and the levy was thirty thousand men.

5:14 And he sent them to Lebanon, ten thousand a month by courses: a month they were in Lebanon, and two months at home: and Adoniram was over the levy.

5:15 And Solomon had threescore and ten thousand that bare burdens, and fourscore thousand hewers in the mountains;

5:16 Beside the chief of Solomon's officers which were over the work, three thousand and three hundred, which ruled over the people that wrought in the work.

5:17 And the king commanded, and they brought great stones, costly stones, and hewed stones, to lay the foundation of the house.

5:18 And Solomon's builders and Hiram's builders did hew them, and the stonesquarers: so they prepared timber and stones to build the house

1 Kings 5:10-18 (KJV)

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