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Sola fide(Latin: by faith alone)

Justification by faith alone.How?Faith with love?Faith include love? If this faith is without love and does not include love.Why can't an or the adversery become saved? How does faith alone explain how you can exclude others with the intellectual faith in Jesus as the Messiah?

Could I get one protestant logical doctrine that could explain How faith alone works and why say Faith Alone when It's not "really" alone?

Also might include in that answer why Satan can't be saved?

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Faith alone (sola fide) is a statement of the Reformers that summarizes their doctrines of justification. It means that a person is found just, or righteous, on the basis of their faith in the identity and testimony of Jesus, and not on the basis of their works, office, parentage, or any other characteristic of the individual.

From the Lutheran Church (Augsburg Confession, Article IV),

Our churches by common consent...teach that men cannot be justified before God by their own strength, merits, or works, but are freely justified for Christ's sake, through faith, when they believe that they are received into favor, and that their sins are forgiven for Christ's sake, who, by His death, has made satisfaction for our sins. This faith God imputes for righteousness in His sight.

Of chief concern is that good works are not required to be saved, but faith alone is sufficient. In Protestant theology, good works are an effect of salvation, but are in no way a cause of salvation, since in that theology the cause and action that bring about salvation are found in God.

The statement certainly does not mean that faith alone exists, or that faith alone is evidence of the work of Christ in the life of the believer.

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    As an aside, which is where this discussion belongs, I don't know how many Protestants argue that fallen angels such as the adversary cannot be saved from condemnation, but the Scriptures do teach that they aren't saved from condemnation. Faith, as it were, is significantly more than intellectual assent, but also heartfelt and trustful submission to the will of God , with Abraham as the prime example. No Protestant would argue that the accuser trusts in God or has faith in God in the manner prescribed by sola fide. – Andrew Sep 12 '16 at 15:52
  • " Faith, as it were, is significantly more than intellectual assent, but also heartfelt and trustful submission to the will of God , with Abraham as the prime example." Could be an answer alone – Aigle Sep 12 '16 at 22:48

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