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Luke 9:62 (NRSVCE) reads:

Jesus said to him, “No one who puts a hand to the plow and looks back is fit for the kingdom of God.”

One finds a parallel in 1 Kings 19:19–21:

So he set out from there, and found Elisha son of Shaphat, who was plowing. There were twelve yoke of oxen ahead of him, and he was with the twelfth. Elijah passed by him and threw his mantle over him. He left the oxen, ran after Elijah, and said, “Let me kiss my father and my mother, and then I will follow you.” Then Elijah said to him, “Go back again; for what have I done to you?” He returned from following him, took the yoke of oxen, and slaughtered them; using the equipment from the oxen, he boiled their flesh, and gave it to the people, and they ate. Then he set out and followed Elijah, and became his servant.

My question is:

Are there any official interpretations available from the perspective of the Catholic Church suggesting that Jesus was referring to the demand of Elijah in this passage, while emphasising the need for earnest pursuit of the Kingdom of Heaven?

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Calmet recognized this. As it says in the Catholic Haydock Commentary for Luke 9:62:

Christ seems here to allude to the call of Eliseus by Elias. The former was at the plough, and the latter called him. Immediately Eliseus quits his plough, runs with Elias's permission to bid adieu to his father and mother, sacrifices two of his oxen, roasts them with the wood of the plough, and joins the company of the prophets. Jesus Christ wishes that all who follow him, should in like manner think of nothing else. (Calmet)

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