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Prior to being baptized, a prospective adult convert to Catholicism attends the Rite of Christian Initiation of Adults (RCIA) wherein they are taught the Catechism of the Catholic Church (CCC).

According to Roman Catholicism, is there a requirement of agreement with the entire Catechism of the Catholic Church (i.e., 100% agreement) before a convert is permitted to be baptized?

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    Perhaps your question can be answered according to Catholic beliefs. But considering that two Catholic priests are giving you opposite answers, I'm not sure that we laypeople here will be able to give you a definitive answer. This does seem to be a pastoral issue that you'll need to work out with the priests under whom you are receiving your Catechism training. They, and not us, are the ones who are guiding your entry into the Catholic Church. – Lee Woofenden May 17 '16 at 1:44
  • @LeeWoofenden Your last two sentences in your comment are, in truth, far better than my answer. – KorvinStarmast May 17 '16 at 11:29
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    I just spoke with the Director of Evangelization today, and he felt like I was on a good path. Thank you for the comments. – Stu W May 18 '16 at 18:12
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Caveat to this answer: Both priests gave you better pastoral guidance than you'll receive on an internet Q&A site.

No, that 100% target isn't a critical milestone for a neophyte, which is the state you'll be in at the Easter Vigil. (One year won't do that volume justice in any case).

If you are "on board" with 97% of the 2865 articles you are strides are ahead of the average Catholic, and certainly most catechumens I've encountered. Two points to consider:

  1. Not all doctrines have the same value, but some may be deal breakers. A person is not ready to enter the Church if he does not believe in the Incarnation, or if he is militantly against a fundamental moral teaching.

  2. Having difficulty accepting or not understanding a given doctrine is very different from rejecting it. Actively rejecting a doctrine (something that the Church proposes for belief) may constitute an obstacle to entry. It is not a problem to have difficulties -- many already in the church experience difficulties with some teachings. These challenges represent an area for growth.

Your point on how impressively few in number are the cradle Catholics who know their own religion in detail reflects my experience as well (I am on my 6th year of serving in the RCIA ministry). What your priests advised you matches our deacon's core message, and our pastor's guidance, which is emphasis on relationships (specifically the relationship with Christ, but it goes deeper than that) and being sincerely open to grow in your Faith. The Catechism is but one resource in nurturing that growth over time.

An overly developed passion for legalism is a criticism that Jesus directed toward the Pharisees, Sadducees, and Scribes in the scriptural narratives of his interactions with them. To adopt a similar "letter of the law" approach to the Catechism, which is meant to teach the church -- all of the church, not just the folks newly entering -- would contradict His points made on that score.

This answer draws on experience in the very journey that you are currently undertaking: both as one who received the sacraments, and as one who now assists others in that same part of their faith journey. (Grateful for the assistance from @AthanasiusofAlex in paragraph 3, both bullet points)

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    Two thoughts (in case you want to include them in your answer): not all doctrines have the same value. For instance, person is not ready to enter the Church if he does not believe in the Incarnation, or if he is militantly against a fundamental moral teaching. On the other hand, it is also true that having a difficulty accepting or not understanding a given doctrine, is very different from rejecting it. I don’t think that someone who actively rejects a doctrine (something that the Church proposes for belief) is ready yet to enter; but it is not a problem to have difficulties. – AthanasiusOfAlex May 17 '16 at 12:52
  • @AthanasiusOfAlex Yes, I was thinking along those lines yesterday but having trouble putting it into words. I will borrow yours, if you don't mind. – KorvinStarmast May 17 '16 at 13:22
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    @AthanasiusOfAlex Yes, I feel like my concerns are related to ignorance as opposed to disbelief, incredulity, or rejection. More of "If A, then B" in terms of the theology--I'm not having any issues with the dogma, if that is the right term. – Stu W May 18 '16 at 18:07
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    @StuW That is right. Faith is a virtue, not a set of beliefs. We should certainly be open to accepting whatever the Church proposes for us to believe, but it is not as if we have to know everything. Growing in knowledge of the faith is a lifelong process. – AthanasiusOfAlex May 18 '16 at 18:52

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