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I heard a guy on talk radio talking to a caller who claimed to be a Frisbeetarian. I had never heard of this religion I wondered if it is Christian or some obscure ancient pagan form of religion. Does anyone here know what their main beliefs might be and how they compare to mainstream churches?

closed as off-topic by Flimzy, curiousdannii, ThaddeusB, Mr. Bultitude, Lee Woofenden Jan 16 '16 at 4:34

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    What did Google tell you? – Flimzy Jan 15 '16 at 11:38
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    I'm voting to close this question as off-topic because it is not about Christianity, and can be easily answered in 30 seconds by Google. – Flimzy Jan 15 '16 at 11:38
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    @flimzy if every question that can be answered in 30 seconds by Google was closed there would not be many open😜 – Kris Jan 15 '16 at 21:37
  • @Pam: As a general rule, questions which can be answered within 1-2 minutes on google should not be asked here. The vast majority of questions on here cannot be quickly answered by Google (or couldn't before they were asked here). This is one of the key metrics we use during site evaluations to determine if a site is "making the Internet a better place". – Flimzy Jan 16 '16 at 9:29
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Frisbeetarianism is a parody religion, along the same lines as Pastafarianism. It is sometimes attributed to comedian George Carlin:

Frisbeetarianism is the belief that when you die, your soul goes up on the roof and gets stuck. (source)

It's also attributed to comedian Jim Stafford in 1975.

In answer to your question then, no, it's not a form of Christianity nor a form of ancient paganism. It's simply a parody, created by comedians, to poke fun at religion.

  • Is this parody poking fun at the purgatory belief in particular? – Kris Jan 14 '16 at 22:26
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    @Pam I haven't had any luck finding additional context for this quote, from either Stafford or Carlin, but Carlin at least made a number of jokes at the expense of Christians and religion in general (see Wikiquote). So I doubt that it's specifically a parody of purgatory, but of souls going anywhere meaningful after death. – Nathaniel Jan 15 '16 at 2:40
  • aintnowaytogo.com/frisbee.htm. The inventor of frisbee golf joked about it being a religion and took a direct swipe at purgatory belief – Kris Jan 15 '16 at 14:22

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