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Does Eastern Orthodoxy teach that there are other Apostles besides the first twelve Apostles, Apostle Paul and the Seventy Apostles?

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The word "apostle" simply means "someone who has been appointed to deliver a message". The word "disciple" means "follower" or "student". English-speaking people today rarely use the word "apostle" other than to refer to "Jesus's Twelve Apostles", but it's common to talk about people today as "disciples", or to call followers of any religious leader his "disciples".

So "the twelve apostles" or "the twelve disciples" were a specific group particularly close to Jesus, but they were not the only people who followed Jesus or to whom he assigned jobs. Luke 10:1 says "After these things the Lord appointed seventy others also, and sent them two by two before His face into every city and place where He Himself was about to go." As Jesus gave these people a specific assignment, they were in the strictest sense "apostles".

So not just Orthodox but also Catholics and Protestants believe there were other apostles and disciples besides "the Twelve".

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    This is a good general answer, but the question was about apostles besides the twelve, Paul, and the seventy. It also asks specifically about what Eastern Orthodoxy teaches about this, so some specific reference to Orthodox sources would be necessary to really nail the answer. – Lee Woofenden May 28 '15 at 13:42
  • Arggh, I mis-read the question. I thought he was referring to the seventy as "other than the 12". But in any case, the essential point of my answer stands: there could be any number of apostles -- apostles with a small "a" -- besides those explicitly mentioned in the Bible. Catholics and Protestants would equally affirm that. The only surprise would be if someone said such other apostles had the same status as the Twelve. – Jay May 28 '15 at 14:00
  • "So not just Orthodox but also Catholics and Protestants believe there were other apostles and disciples besides "the Twelve" - Perhaps, I am wrong, but as far as the Eastern Orthodoxy is concerned, I see them today have and use such titles in their hierarchy as "deacon", "priest", "bishop", "metropolitan" and "patriarch", but never "apostle". – brilliant May 28 '15 at 15:00
  • "Arggh, I mis-read the question. I thought he was referring to the seventy as "other than the 12" - Which is exactly what I meant in my question - meaning that those 70 were other than the 12 - so you didn't mis-read it. – brilliant May 28 '15 at 15:06
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The Orthodox Church gives a number of saints the title "Equal to the Apostles." There's a list of some on Wikipedia:

Equal to the Apostles

Notable members of this group include Mary Magdalene; St Nino/Nina, who evangelized the Georgians; Cyril and Methodius, who evangelized the Slavs; and St Patrick.

  • This title seems to be non-correlating to a position in Church hierarchy as some on the list are bishops, some are political figures, and some are just common people. Also, the list stops on Nicholas of Japan who died in 1912. Does that mean that nowadays there is no one equal to the Apostles in the Orthodox Church? – brilliant May 30 '15 at 11:48

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