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Does the Roman Catholic Church have an official position on creation science, like it has a position regarding evolution?

marked as duplicate by David Stratton Apr 4 '15 at 15:53

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  • Catholics are free to believe in a young earth. They are also free to believe in a earth that formed over billions of years and a result of the Big Bang. As I do. The mystery of Gods creation has not been fully revealed to us, he gives us intuition to explore his creation and we can see his influence on it. The bible is in some sense a historical book, but it is not strickly so, it is first an historical document. If you try to use it in a manor that it was not intended for such as calculating the age of creation you risk running a fools errand. It is cLear that our universe is older. – Marc Apr 4 '15 at 10:05
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Catholics should weigh the evidence for the universe’s age by examining biblical and scientific evidence. "Though faith is above reason, there can never be any real discrepancy between faith and reason. Since the same God who reveals mysteries and infuses faith has bestowed the light of reason on the human mind, God cannot deny himself, nor can truth ever contradict truth" (Catechism of the Catholic Church 159).

The contribution made by the physical sciences to examining these questions is stressed by the Catechism, which states, "The question about the origins of the world and of man has been the object of many scientific studies which have splendidly enriched our knowledge of the age and dimensions of the cosmos, the development of life-forms and the appearance of man. These discoveries invite us to even greater admiration for the greatness of the Creator, prompting us to give him thanks for all his works and for the understanding and wisdom he gives to scholars and researchers" (CCC 283).

The Catechism explains that "Scripture presents the work of the Creator symbolically as a succession of six days of divine ‘work,’ concluded by the ‘rest’ of the seventh day" (CCC 337), but "nothing exists that does not owe its existence to God the Creator. The world began when God’s word drew it out of nothingness; all existent beings, all of nature, and all human history is rooted in this primordial event, the very genesis by which the world was constituted and time begun" (CCC 338).

The Catholic Church has always taught that "no real disagreement can exist between the theologian and the scientist provided each keeps within his own limits. . . . If nevertheless there is a disagreement . . . it should be remembered that the sacred writers, or more truly ‘the Spirit of God who spoke through them, did not wish to teach men such truths (as the inner structure of visible objects) which do not help anyone to salvation’; and that, for this reason, rather than trying to provide a scientific exposition of nature, they sometimes describe and treat these matters either in a somewhat figurative language or as the common manner of speech those times required, and indeed still requires nowadays in everyday life, even amongst most learned people" (Leo XIII, Providentissimus Deus 18).

As the Catechism puts it, "Methodical research in all branches of knowledge, provided it is carried out in a truly scientific manner and does not override moral laws, can never conflict with the faith, because the things of the world and the things the of the faith derive from the same God. The humble and persevering investigator of the secrets of nature is being led, as it were, by the hand of God in spite of himself, for it is God, the conserver of all things, who made them what they are" (CCC 159). The Catholic Church has no fear of science or scientific discovery.

  • I prefer the weighed and measured response of the divinely guided Church. Ken Hamm while trying to fit all of the dinosaurs that ever existed onto one boat is trying to fit a square peg in a round hole. the shear numbers of creatures that have gone extinct since the creation of the world is over whelming. This question when confronted by Bill Nye was dodged. Christians need to embrace Truth not fantasy, the embracing of fantasies created by men are far to many especially in North America. Perpetuating Falsehoods have a negative impact on evangelization. It makes christians appear silly. – Marc Apr 4 '15 at 10:41
  • Catholics understand also that the "Word of "God" is jesus, the bible consists of the WORDS of God but is not Jesus. Just like the Risen Lord, the body of Christ is a living breathing thing which posses elements of both this world (flesh) and the world to come (spirit) just as jesus had possessed. The interpretation of scripture is best left in the guidance of the Church in whose hands that function was divinely given. – Marc Apr 4 '15 at 11:04

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