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Love and hatred are often described as polar feelings, therefore one cannot exist without the other. Just like magnet poles. Jesus is known as a person who could love all the people. Does it emphasize his uniqueness (he couldn't hate anyone or anything) or maybe there is a chance that hatred was familiar to him.

closed as too broad by Flimzy, David Stratton Dec 15 '14 at 0:49

Please edit the question to limit it to a specific problem with enough detail to identify an adequate answer. Avoid asking multiple distinct questions at once. See the How to Ask page for help clarifying this question. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • Hi and welcome. Even though there may be more latitude than at BH.SE for your question (we don't require a specific text as a starting point like they do), we're still looking for questions that are objectively answerable from a particular perspective. With that in mind, who (ie. which specific Christian perspective) are you wanting an answer from? – bruised reed Dec 14 '14 at 13:40
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    The word hate used in modern translations has many differing meanings, so in order to get an answer with any true meaning it is going to be necessary that you define more precisely what you mean by hate. – BYE Dec 15 '14 at 0:36
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It is impossible to love without hating. They are opposites in a sense--in the same sense that every coin has two sides, and without one side the other cannot exist.

  • If you love your child, you have anything which harms your child: illness, a kidnapper, a vengeful ex-boyfriend
  • If you love cleanliness, you hate dirtiness
  • If you love quiet, you hate noise
  • If you love every person in the world, you hate anything which might harm them: Sin, the devil, foolish choices

So yes, absolutely, Jesus (and God the Father) is capable of hate. It's impossible to have love without also having hate.

The strongest direct Biblical support for God hating is not in the context of Jesus, but there is some for that as well.

  • Luke 14:26, Jesus instructing us to hate:

    “If anyone comes to me and does not hate father and mother, wife and children, brothers and sisters—yes, even their own life—such a person cannot be my disciple.

  • Romans 9:13:

    Just as it is written: “Jacob I loved, but Esau I hated.”

  • Deuteronomy 32:19:

    The Lord saw this and rejected them
    because he was angered by his sons and daughters.

  • And here is a more exhaustive list of other such verses.

  • The word hate used in modern translations has many differing meanings, so in order to get an answer with any true meaning it is going to be necessary that you define more precisely what you mean by hate. – BYE Dec 14 '14 at 16:08
  • @Bye: I would say that's a deficiency of the question, not of the answer. – Flimzy Dec 15 '14 at 0:31
  • You're right sorry for putting my comment in the wrong place. please accept my apology. – BYE Dec 15 '14 at 0:35
  • @Bye: No apology necessary. No harm done. :) – Flimzy Dec 15 '14 at 0:35
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Could Jesus Christ hate something or someone?

Yes. Since Jesus is God, he would hate the same things God hates.

John 10:30 I and my Father are one.

Proverbs 6:16-19 These six things doth the LORD hate: yea, seven are an abomination unto him: A proud look, a lying tongue, and hands that shed innocent blood, An heart that deviseth wicked imaginations, feet that be swift in running to mischief, A false witness that speaketh lies, and he that soweth discord among brethren.

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