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You may have heard "For the love of God" or "For God's sakes", but those are directed at God or Christ or both.

But are there examples of English words and phrases that are associated with or evolved from minced oaths and outright blasphemies of the Virgin Mary? Since the Virgin Mary is such an important figure in Christianity, it's logical to think that some Christians will hold that blasphemy against Mary is a serious offence, even if not as serious as blasphemy against God.

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    This question appears to be off-topic because it is about making a list. – Steve Dec 6 '14 at 2:53
  • @Steve I have made it less of a list. – Double U Dec 6 '14 at 2:56
  • you still want a list of examples. :) – Steve Dec 6 '14 at 2:58
  • It's a great question though – Ben Mordecai Dec 6 '14 at 4:32
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    @fredsbend In Romeo and Juliet, the introductory scene has a line where one character cries out "Marry!" Commentary may suggest that he is really referring to the Virgin Mary. The use of the term in that context may suggest a minced oath of the Virgin Mary. – Double U Dec 6 '14 at 22:45
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People exclaim, "Mother of God!" when they see something astonishing, which would be a minced oath towards Mary.

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  • Interesting. I often hear a variant - "Mother of Pearl!" – Double U Dec 6 '14 at 4:56
  • Nice question, nice answer. Never heard 'Mother of Pearl' - can't wait to use it. – gideon marx Dec 6 '14 at 7:04
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Since the Virgin Mary is such an important figure in Christianity, it's logical to think that some Christians will hold that blasphemy against Mary is a serious offence, even if not as serious as blasphemy against God.


Please see the Catechism of the Catholic Church, 2142 and 2146:

CCC 2142 The second commandment prescribes respect for the Lord's name. Like the first commandment, it belongs to the virtue of religion and more particularly it governs our use of speech in sacred matters.

CCC 2146 The second commandment forbids the abuse of God's name, i.e., every improper use of the names of God, Jesus Christ, but also of the Virgin Mary and all the saints.

With these, one would then easily recognize when the sacred names and those of the saints are improperly used.


Endnote

It is observed and commented that when people learn a new language, bad words are among the first to be learned. Christianity - Stack Exchange being a question and answer site for committed Christians, experts in Christianity and those interested in learning more, I believe providing examples would not only be inappropriate, but might also be in itself contravening the second commandment.

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  • I suppose a Catholic-raised nonreligious person could answer. :) – Double U Dec 6 '14 at 19:29

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