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I have heard people state that the LDS doctrine that Jesus Christ is Jehovah is incorrect. I have been studying the titles of Jehovah in Isaiah 40-48 and I have found that they are similar and in many cases the same as in the new testament relating to Jesus Christ, for example, Redeemer, Savior, King of Israel, Creator, First and the Last. Do Non-LDS Christians believe Jehovah is Jesus Christ? Or does that name belong to God the Father? Or both?

My question is, from a trinitarian perspective, who is Jehovah? Is it God the Father, or Jesus Christ?

  • This question is basically asking about the persons of the Trinity, and I'm not sure how to answer. Are you coming from an LDS perspective, wanting to understand how Trinitarians marry the people? If so, I think this is a dupe – Affable Geek Nov 24 '14 at 21:23
  • That said, I don't want to VTC until I'm sure I understand your question – Affable Geek Nov 24 '14 at 21:25
  • I am LDS trying to understand the Trinity.I want to know if the name Jehovah belongs to Jesus Christ, God the Father, or both. – atherises Nov 24 '14 at 21:25
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    The name belongs to all three persons of the Godhead. The name of God is Yahveh ("Jehovah"); therefore, any person who is God is also named Yahveh. – user900 Nov 24 '14 at 23:28
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Traditionally, the divine name (YHWH aka "Jehovah") is associated with God the Father - the God of the Old Testament. Jesus is associated with God the Son, the incarnation of the Godhead.

Traditionally, the LDS answer is very straight-forward: God the Father is one distinct person, Jesus is another. From a non-Trinitarian perspective this is very easy to understand. The problem is, it would seem to violate the notion that "Behold, the Lord your God is One" to Trinitarians. Understand, the Trinity is itself a paradox, but it is the best formulation we have.

In the classic formulation of the Trinity, God the Father ("YHWH") and God the Son (Jesus) are one essence but different persons. As the Athansian Creed puts it:

... we worship one God in Trinity, and Trinity in Unity; Neither confounding the Persons; nor dividing the Essence. For there is one Person of the Father; another of the Son; and another of the Holy Ghost.

The idea is that God is One Essence so throughly in agreement that it is impossible to distinguish their "Godness" from one another. That said, to deny that they have distinct personhood violates scripture that indicates the Godhead is composed of distinctly willed individuals. The Person of God the Father was the Person who gave his divine Jehovah name "I am that I am." The Person of Jesus, who was the incarnation of God the Son is a different person, but indistinguishable in essence from him.

Clear as mud right?

Traditionally, the answer is that the title adheres to God the Father, but in essence, you wouldn't really be able to distinguish them.

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    I almost feel like I have more questions, but that does answer the question at hand. Thank you. +1 But one thing needs to be corrected. LDS Doctrine states the Jehovah is Jesus Christ – atherises Nov 24 '14 at 21:35
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    If you don't have questions about the Trinity, you don't understand it :) – Affable Geek Nov 24 '14 at 21:36
  • In an LDS binding psalm 83:18 notes Jehovah as Jesus. I'm paraphrasing but the note was pretty succinct. I found that a little odd. PS, I'm not disagreeing with you or anything. Just noting that in my own study I concluded LDS belief the Jehovah and Jesus are synonymous based on the annotation of one of their publications. KJV, BOM, D&C and Pearl. – Bubbles Nov 25 '14 at 0:51
  • @Bubbles that is really interesting- looked that up and sure enough, Mormons do state that, JWs posit the precise opposite- same verse proves Jesus isn't Jehovah BC of ps. 83.18. Personally I go with the old hermeneutic of "it can't mean what it couldn't have meant to the author." That said, the assuredness with which people ascribe the person is quite fasicinating. – Affable Geek Nov 25 '14 at 1:23

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