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After Moses spent forty days and nights on the mountain, he gave the people the requirements God had told him to say to the Israelites:

All Scripture is quoted from the King James translation unless otherwise noted.

Exodus 19:3 And Moses went up unto God, and the LORD called unto him out of the mountain, saying, Thus shalt thou say to the house of Jacob, and tell the children of Israel;

In the chapters between 19 and 25 are the laws God gave Moses, but in chapter 25,God in giving Moses instructions on building the Tabernacle said:

Exodus 25:8 and 9 And let them make me a sanctuary; that I may dwell among them. According to all that I shew thee, after the pattern of the tabernacle, and the pattern of all the instruments thereof, even so shall ye make it.

according to that Scripture God showed Moses some visions, and also;

Exodus 25:40 And look that thou make them after their pattern, which was shewed thee in the mount.

If I am reading the Scriptures correctly God not only told Moses what to tell the Israelites to do, but also gave him visions of exactly how the Tabernacle and its furnishings should be made.

Did God also give Moses visions of History which he then recorded in Genesis?

closed as primarily opinion-based by Flimzy, Nathaniel, Mr. Bultitude, curiousdannii, bruised reed Sep 3 '15 at 5:04

Many good questions generate some degree of opinion based on expert experience, but answers to this question will tend to be almost entirely based on opinions, rather than facts, references, or specific expertise. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • @Mawia that question though related does not cover visions. – BYE Aug 7 '14 at 12:30
  • @Bye The selected answer in that question quoted by Mawia cites both historical narrative and special revelation. Does vision not come under the purview of special revelations? If not, what about dreams and dark speech? Word of knowledge? Or was the time on Mt. Sinai somehow not special... – Zoe Aug 7 '14 at 20:53
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Most definitely. The passage makes it clear that the earthly sanctuary was modeled after another Sanctuary, the True Sanctuary made by the LORD Himself. This is what was shown to Moses in vision.

Now this is the main point of the things we are saying: We have such a High Priest, who is seated at the right hand of the throne of the Majesty in the heavens, a Minister of the sanctuary and of the true tabernacle which the Lord erected, and not man.

Hebrews 8:1,2

For if He were on earth, He would not be a priest, since there are priests who offer the gifts according to the law; 5 who serve the copy and shadow of the heavenly things, as Moses was divinely instructed when he was about to make the tabernacle. For He said, “See that you make all things according to the pattern shown you on the mountain.”[a] 6 But now He has obtained a more excellent ministry, inasmuch as He is also Mediator of a better covenant, which was established on better promises.

Hebrews 8:4,6

Divine inspiration does not work in the way that God dictates word for word, as it is known that different authors had different writing styles. Nevertheless, they were all inspired by the Holy Spirit. Because Moses did not live in that time, a vision must have been shown to him in order for him to be able to write the Genesis account in such detail. Some also think that Moses was the author of the Book of Job.

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    I would also like to comment that this is why we should study the earthly sanctuary and its rituals, because it gives us insight into the heavenly sanctuary and the work of Christ before, during, and after the cross. – jlaverde Aug 7 '14 at 12:49
  • If you're going to down-vote, please explain why as it will help improve the answer. – jlaverde Aug 7 '14 at 14:59
  • Sorry about the down vote I will change it as soon as I can, should be an up vote – BYE Aug 7 '14 at 16:49
  • @Bye I did notice it didn't answer your question completely and added a bit more so that it would be more complete. :) – jlaverde Aug 7 '14 at 18:22
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    Without some additional textual support, using what metaphoric language from the new testament as proof of something literal in the old testament seems like a pretty week argument. – Flimzy Aug 7 '14 at 19:05

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