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After looking at Clarence Larkin's charts, I noticed that some (chart1, chart2) of them associate the Kingdom in Daniel 2:44 with the Millenium Kingdom. Is there any doctrine that supports this? I would hate that the Church is still under the Roman Kingdom - iron and clay. Divided.

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    The charts alone are a hodgepodge without the accompanying literature. You need to read not only the designated Scriptures, but also Clarence Larkin's notations and narrative. – BYE Jan 19 '14 at 19:11
  • What is the millenium kingdom and what is its origin? – V. Rollins Mar 29 '14 at 23:32
  • I would like to show you something that can help for your studies. What lines from the Book of Revelation do you feel describes the Second Coming? – Decrypted Jul 1 '14 at 2:47
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I would hate that the Church is still under the Roman Kingdom - iron and clay. Divided.

Without getting into the discussion of the Millenium Kingdom, I thought it might be helpful to take a look at Daniel 2:43-45 (let's use the NIV):

And just as you saw the iron mixed with baked clay, so the people will be a mixture and will not remain united, any more than iron mixes with clay.

"In the time of those kings, the God of heaven will set up a kingdom that will never be destroyed, nor will it be left to another people. It will crush all those kingdoms and bring them to an end, but it will itself endure forever.

This is the meaning of the vision of the rock cut out of a mountain, but not by human hands--a rock that broke the iron, the bronze, the clay, the silver and the gold to pieces. "The great God has shown the king what will take place in the future. The dream is true and its interpretation is trustworthy."

And let's take a quick look a bit earlier at 2:35:

Then the iron, the clay, the bronze, the silver and the gold were all broken to pieces and became like chaff on a threshing floor in the summer. The wind swept them away without leaving a trace. But the rock that struck the statue became a huge mountain and filled the whole earth.

Let's also quote Revelation 20:6-7 just so we all know what we're talking about:

Blessed and holy are those who share in the first resurrection. The second death has no power over them, but they will be priests of God and of Christ and will reign with him for a thousand years.

When the thousand years are over, Satan will be released from his prison

Let's just highlight a few points outlined here. First of all, note that the kingdom in Daniel will endure forever. Now, strictly speaking, holding to Biblical literalism in all cases isn't necessary the most sure-fire method of evaluating theological bases, but Revelation 20:7 does specific that the end of the 1000 year reign is terminating by an event (the release of Satan) so it is perhaps unreasonable to consider the Millennium Kingdom (which terminates) as equivalent to the Daniel kingdom (which explicitly never terminates).

Is there any doctrine that supports this interpretation?

Certainly!

Is there any reasonable doctrine, internally consistent and grounded in Biblical evidence that supports this interpretation?

That is for you to decide.

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  • Well written and supported. – Matt Gutting Aug 8 '14 at 19:04
  • Feel free to let me know if you have any other questions or comments. – Calvin Aug 11 '14 at 17:02
  • You have stated a common misunderstanding used against the idea of a millennial reign. Nowhere does scripture say the reign is terminated by the release of Satan. Just because Absalom challenged David or because David was at war do we claim his reign ended? No. Just because it says he will reign 1000 years does that mean he will not reign 1001? No. It simply means after 1000 years of reigning the final battle with Satan will happen. But Jesus' reign never ends. What the kingdom looks like may change, but it's still Jesus on the throne for eternity. That is a very poor logical argument. – Joshua Aug 22 '16 at 21:52

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