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For reference, here's Luke 13:28, ESV:

In that place there will be weeping and gnashing of teeth, when you see Abraham and Isaac and Jacob and all the prophets in the kingdom of God but you yourselves cast out.

All remaining references to the place of weeping and gnashing of teeth leads to the idea that "that place" is hell. References are as follows:

Matthew 8:12

But the subjects of the kingdom will be thrown outside, into the darkness, where there will be weeping and gnashing of teeth.”

Matthew 13:42

They will throw them into the blazing furnace, where there will be weeping and gnashing of teeth.

Matthew 13:50

and throw them into the blazing furnace, where there will be weeping and gnashing of teeth.

Matthew 22:13

“Then the king told the attendants, ‘Tie him hand and foot, and throw him outside, into the darkness, where there will be weeping and gnashing of teeth.’

Matthew 24:51

He will cut him to pieces and assign him a place with the hypocrites, where there will be weeping and gnashing of teeth.

Matthew 25:30

And throw that worthless servant outside, into the darkness, where there will be weeping and gnashing of teeth.’

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  • this is kind of opinion based as it is currently phrased. Is there a particular denomination's perspective you'd like
    – depperm
    Commented May 15 at 17:37
  • @depperm protestantism - I'll add it. Is any question that can be answered differently based on the denomination considered opinion-based? I ask because I'm somewhat new to CSE Commented May 15 at 17:48
  • The rich man could perceive Lazarus in the bosom of the father (Abraham). Up-voted +1.
    – Nigel J
    Commented May 15 at 19:22
  • I posted my answer under the misapprehension that this was the Hermeneutics.SE site (I'd just been looking at it, and this looked like a question about the meaning of a single verse.), so I might end up deleting it. ¶ But for this site the question would be much better asked as something like "Which denominations believe that In Luke 13:28, Jesus is saying in part that people in hell will be tormented by being able to look into heaven and see what they're missing out on?". I.e. asking about an objective truth about denominational belief rather than asking about truth itself. Commented May 15 at 19:28
  • 1
    There's no "have to", but questions are better received if they ask for objective answers. "Is Jesus …?" is potentially asking for everyone's personal opinion, which is not good, whereas "Do Catholics believe Jesus is …?" is asking for an objective answer that should be identical, whether provided by a Catholic, a Hindu, or an Atheist. To you it might be the same question, but on most Stack Exchange sites it makes a big difference. Commented May 15 at 20:06

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There is a textual and thematic connection between your passage in Luke and Psalm 107:2-3:

Let the redeemed of the Lord tell their story—
    those he redeemed from the hand of the foe,
those he gathered from the lands,
    from east and west, from north and south.

Psalm 107 is talking about the final ingathering of Israel from exile, whereas Luke 13 is talking about the final ingathering of all believers.

The rejection of many who thought that they would make the cut is like the Parable of the Wedding Feast in Matthew 22. The sending out of invitations and efforts to bring people to the wedding is analogous to the ingathering of Israel. After the guests have been invited and arrangements made, some who arrive for the wedding are not admitted.

11 “But when the king came in to see the guests, he noticed a man there who was not wearing wedding clothes. 12 He asked, ‘How did you get in here without wedding clothes, friend?’ The man was speechless.

13 “Then the king told the attendants, ‘Tie him hand and foot, and throw him outside, into the darkness, where there will be weeping and gnashing of teeth.’

Jesus' parable does not say where this wedding is, but there is a conscious realization by the guests who were turned away that they had been rejected.

Revelation speaks of the wedding supper of the lamb. After the New Jerusalem descends, it appears to happen on earth. However, Revelation is hard to interpret.

Personally, I differ with assertions made in another answer to this question for I believe that the Millennial Kingdom has already come and gone, and Satan has already been bound and then released. Despite that, I agree that it is not necessary to conclude that the passage is talking about heaven. I would not reject the possibility completely, but do not see evidence for it in that passage in Luke. There are many parables about the final separation of peoples into saved and damned, like the angels catching fish, the tares being bundled up and burned, etc. I would expand my focus to include them, which might add other details that point to heaven.

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Not a complete answer, but my response here is the beginning of the Seventh Day Adventist view...)i do not have time at this point this morning to reference the latter half of my answer.

Notice exactly what Christ says to his disciples in verse 25...

25After the master of the house gets up and shuts the door, you will stand outside knocking and saying, ‘Lord, open the door for us.’

He returns to this topic a little later in Luke Chapter 17...

26Just as it was in the days of Noah, so also will it be in the days of the Son of Man: 27People were eating and drinking, marrying and being given in marriage, up to the day Noah entered the ark. Then the flood came and destroyed them all.

28It was the same in the days of Lot: People were eating and drinking, buying and selling, planting and building. 29But on the day Lot left Sodom, fire and sulfur rained down from heaven and destroyed them all.

30It will be just like that on the day the Son of Man is revealed.

There is a clear cross reference here to Noahs flood in Genesis Chapter 7.

Note the type/antitype parallels between Noahs flood and the second coming of Christ in the following texts...

Psalm 32:6 For this shall every one that is godly pray unto thee in a time when thou mayest be found: surely in the floods of great waters they shall not come nigh unto him.

Isaiah 55:6 Seek ye the LORD while he may be found, call ye upon him while he is near:

2 Corinthians 6:2 For he saith, I have heard thee in a time accepted, and in the day of salvation have I succoured thee: behold, now is the accepted time; behold, now is the day of salvation.

Genesis 7:16 And they that went in, went in male and female of all flesh, as God had commanded him: and the LORD shut him in.

Matthew 25:10 And while they went to buy, the bridegroom came; and they that were ready went in with him to the marriage: and the door was shut.

The interesting thing is that whilst the destruction in Noahs flood appeared to be the focus, in reality it is also an event of judgement on the wicked.

Ellcotts commentary says the following about Luke 13.25

Verse 25. - When once the master of the house is risen up, and hath shut to the door, and ye begin to stand without, and Co knock at the door, saying, Lord, Lord, open unto us; and he shall answer and say unto you, I know you not whence ye are. The great Teacher here slightly changes the imagery. The narrow door no longer is the centre of the picture; one, called the "master of the house," becomes the principal figure. The door now shut may still be, most probably is, the narrow fort or hill-city entrance, and the one called the master is the governor of the Place of Arms, into which the door or gate led. It is now too late even for the earnest striver to enter in. Sunset probably - the shades of night, had the Divine Painter furnished the imagery - would have been the signal for the final closing of the door of the fortress. Death is the period when the door of salvation is shut to the children of men. It has been asked - To what time does the Master refer in the words" when once"? It cannot be the epoch of the ruin of Jerusalem and the breaking up of the Jewish nationality, for then there was nothing in the attitude of the doomed people to answer to the standing without, to the knocking at the door, and to the imploring cries, "Lord, Lord, open unto us," portrayed here. It cannot be the second coming of the Lord; surely then his people will not call on him in vain. It refers, without doubt, to the day of judgment, when the dread award will be pronounced upon the unbelieving, the selfish, and the evil-liver.

The SDA view is that when Adam and Eve were warned of the consequences of eating of the fruit of the tree of the knowledge of good and evil, we find later in the narrative that the predicted death was not instantaneous.

In the days of Noahs flood, he preached to them for 120 years and when the rain started, the wicked did not all die instantly (although I'm sure some did). They died over time (in this case it was perhaps days or weeks)

SDA's believe that Christ is in heaven judging right now and by the time the Second Coming event happens, that judgement will essentially be complete.

Those alive on earth at that time have a deadline that we call the "close of probation" after which those who have not chosen wisely are locked out by a closing of the door (type/antitype parallel examples are the door of the Ark and the door into the wedding vs close of probation and second coming of Christ)

We are told that:

  1. the wicked who are alive at the Second Coming will be killed by the brightness of His coming (first death)
  2. There will be a time period of 1000 years where satan and his angels will roam the earth with no one to tempt
  3. Finally, all wicked will be raised and they will be shown all their wicked deads, after which they will be cast into the lake of fire along with satan and his angels.

We do not believe that the wicked will be alive whilst forever tormented in hell. The wicked in Noahs day and the day of destruction of Sodom and Gomorah were destroyed. We know that all who were alive and died in Noahs flood are lost...none of them will enter the kingdom of heaven. I do not recall biblical texts suggesting that any of the wicked who have already died (examples are those of Noahs flood and Sodom & Gomorah) are in hell being tormented right now...but they are all lost. Revelation tells us that there will be a second death at the end of the final judgment.

13The sea gave up its dead, and Death and Hades gave up their dead, and each one was judged according to his deeds. 14Then Death and Hades were thrown into the lake of fire. This is the second death— the lake of fire.

Death is explained in Ecclesiastes 9:

4There is hope, however, for anyone who is among the living; for even a live dog is better than a dead lion. 5For the living know that they will die, but the dead know nothing. They have no further reward, because the memory of them is forgotten.

6Their love, their hate, and their envy have already vanished, and they will never again have a share in all that is done under the sun.


Concordance cross references for Ecc 9:5

Job 14:21 If his sons receive honor, he does not know it; if they are brought low, he is unaware.

Psalm 88:12 Will Your wonders be known in the darkness, or Your righteousness in the land of oblivion?

Ecclesiastes 1:11 There is no remembrance of those who came before, and those yet to come will not be remembered by those who follow after.

Ecclesiastes 2:16 For there is no lasting remembrance of the wise, just as with the fool, seeing that both will be forgotten in the days to come. Alas, the wise man will die just like the fool!

Ecclesiastes 8:10 Then too, I saw the burial of the wicked who used to go in and out of the holy place, and they were praised in the city where they had done so. This too is futile.

Ecclesiastes 9:4 There is hope, however, for anyone who is among the living; for even a live dog is better than a dead lion.

Ecclesiastes 9:10 Whatever you find to do with your hands, do it with all your might, for in Sheol, where you are going, there is no work or planning or knowledge or wisdom.

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NOTE: I posted this answer under the misapprehension that this was the Hermeneutics.SE site (I'd just been looking at it, and this looked like a question about the meaning of a single verse.), so I might end up deleting it.


There is nothing in that text that refers to either heaven or hell.
Bringing those ideas into the question is eisegesis, not exegeses, and really don't belong in the question.

The issue is more about hermeneutics than of interpretation.


The underlying question is, what does "that place" refer to?

Consider the context in Luke 13:

23 Then said one unto him, Lord, are there few that be saved? And he said unto them, 24 Strive to enter in at the strait gate: for many, I say unto you, will seek to enter in, and shall not be able.

There will be people that will not be saved.

25 When once the master of the house is risen up, and hath shut to the door, and ye begin to stand without, and to knock at the door, saying, Lord, Lord, open unto us; and he shall answer and say unto you, I know you not whence ye are:

Many of those people will think that they had been saved, but Jesus will reject them.

26 Then shall ye begin to say, We have eaten and drunk in thy presence, and thou hast taught in our streets. 27 But he shall say, I tell you, I know you not whence ye are; depart from me, all ye workers of iniquity.

Even though they went along with Jesus, they didn't really believe or fully practice what he taught. Jesus will reject them.

28 There shall be weeping and gnashing of teeth, when ye shall see Abraham, and Isaac, and Jacob, and all the prophets, in the kingdom of God, and you yourselves thrust out.

These people have been living in the Kingdom of God (probably as part of the second resurrection at the end of the Millennium). They have been taught God's way, but have rejected it.

But at the final judgement they realize that that they have failed and will soon be condemned to destruction, while those around them (including well known saints) have succeeded and either have or soon will be transformed into immortal spirit beings.

29 And they shall come from the east, and from the west, and from the north, and from the south, and shall sit down in the kingdom of God. 30 And, behold, there are last which shall be first, and there are first which shall be last.

Many people, from all over the world, will be in the Kingdom, but those that think highly of themselves will not receive what they expected.

They will be upset (weeping) and angry (gnashing) about what is about to happen to them, but it is now too late.


Clearly "that place" refers to the Kingdom of God, near the end of the Millennium, right here on Earth. It has nothing remotely to do with any concept of hell or heaven.

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  • I added references about the place of weeping and gnashing of teeth above, and based on them, it seems "that place" is hell. Note that in Luke 13:28, the people are "cast out" the kingdom of God; they're outside it Commented May 15 at 20:23

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