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Mainstream Christians believe that God truly suffered during Jesus’s life on earth. But if God perceives reality in one eternal moment, doesn’t that mean that His whole existence is suffering? Doesn’t this basically mean that God is being eternally tormented much like being in hell?

EDIT:

Nobody says that God suffered, so this question should probably be deleted.

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    Who are 'mainstream Christians' ? What does it mean that 'God' suffered (do you mean Jesus of Nazareth ?) ? What does 'one eternal moment' mean (a 'moment' is a measure of time) ? What is meant by God 'perceiving' something (who is all-knowing) ?
    – Nigel J
    Apr 24 at 2:03
  • @NigelJ Orthodox and Catholic and possibly others. It is a dogmatic belief that God suffered. What it means is basically the question. By eternal I mean that you can’t say God did suffer in the past, since He is outside of time.
    – wmasse
    Apr 24 at 2:11
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    Could you susbtantiate what you are claiming in regard to 'God' suffering, please. Some links to referenced quotations would suffice. I am not aware of such a 'dogmatic belief' in regard to Deity. Though I am aware of the 'sufferings of Christ'. Jehovah 'suffered' the bad manners of the children of Israel in the wilderness but that is not what we term 'suffering' rather he 'endured' their behaviour.
    – Nigel J
    Apr 24 at 2:21
  • God is not some imaginary animal trapped in a cage of a moment in time haha. The eternal now means he knows the end as clearly as the beginning and nothing in time can affect his eternal and perfectly joyous disposition. You idea of God has no resemblance to a Christian view.
    – Mike
    Apr 24 at 11:05
  • This needs to be scoped to trinitarians or those who hold the view that Jesus is God Apr 25 at 7:43

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But if God perceives reality in one eternal moment, doesn’t that mean that His whole existence is suffering?

...No? This makes no sense whatsoever as it ignores all of time that is apart from that tiny slice that was Jesus' suffering. It also makes no consideration for the effects of inserting Himself into time.

Doesn’t this basically mean that God is being eternally tormented much like being in hell?

It would be more accurate to say that Jesus' experience is eternally a part of God. (Not unlike how a past experience becomes a part of any human.) Your questions however would imply that it is the only part, which is simply absurd. Even within time, Jesus was around for a lot longer than Maundy Thursday through Easter Sunday.

Note also that the torment of hell is primarily being separated from God. While Christians believe that Jesus did experience this (although just how He experienced being separated from Himself is ripe grounds for debate), it certainly isn't a "permanent" state of affairs.

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    I would hesitate any time I used the words "part of God"
    – Peter Turner
    Apr 24 at 16:03
  • @PeterTurner, "part" in the sense that logic is a "part". That is, God has logic, but logic is not the totality of what God is. God "has" the experiences of Jesus, for whatever "has" means when talking about experiences, but Jesus' suffering is not the totality of what God is, as the OP seems to imply. I don't see a problem here with my use of the phrase.
    – Matthew
    Apr 24 at 17:14
  • @PeterTurner Agree with Matthew here, esp. when OT implies God has body parts :-). I guess we're uncomfortable with the language because we bring Divine Simplicity in the discussion, but that's a whole other matter. Experiences are many, as with the time slices of those experiences. The doctrine of God outside time should be understood as God experiencing those time slices "all at once", which Boethius calls the "Eternal Present" and which Eleonore Stump (with her mentor Norman Kretzmann) formalizes as E-T simultaneity. Apr 24 at 17:26

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