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Protestants often associate Mormonism with outlandish1 doctrines like innumerable Gods, people living on the sun, or special underwear that you can't take off2. But I am curious what lies at the "other end of the spectrum"; are there any Mormon doctrines which have been so embraced by Protestants as to shape their beliefs?

That is, are there any common Protestant beliefs which have their origin in Mormon teachings?

The reason I ask is:

  • Culture plays a big part in how we think of God, Church, ScriptureLike it or not, etc.modern Protestant thinking is influenced by our culture

  • Mormonism is a significant part of our culture

  • I am curious if "A+B=C", so to speak; has Mormonism had any significant impact on the shaping of Protestant thinking?


[1] My use of the word 'outlandish' here is not meant to be inflammatory. Such ideas are commonly viewed by Protestants as 'outlandish' (foreign, strange, etc.); I realize they may not seem outlandish to Mormons, and I realize that many Protestant doctrines would seem outlandish to non-Protestants.

[2] Please note that these are my words, based on things I've heard Protestants say - not the words of modern Mormon theologians.

Protestants often associate Mormonism with outlandish1 doctrines like innumerable Gods, people living on the sun, or special underwear that you can't take off2. But I am curious what lies at the "other end of the spectrum"; are there any Mormon doctrines which have been so embraced by Protestants as to shape their beliefs?

That is, are there any common Protestant beliefs which have their origin in Mormon teachings?

The reason I ask is:

  • Culture plays a big part in how we think of God, Church, Scripture, etc.

  • Mormonism is a significant part of our culture

  • I am curious if "A+B=C", so to speak; has Mormonism had any significant impact on the shaping of Protestant thinking?


[1] My use of the word 'outlandish' here is not meant to be inflammatory. Such ideas are commonly viewed by Protestants as 'outlandish' (foreign, strange, etc.); I realize they may not seem outlandish to Mormons, and I realize that many Protestant doctrines would seem outlandish to non-Protestants.

[2] Please note that these are my words, based on things I've heard Protestants say - not the words of modern Mormon theologians.

Protestants often associate Mormonism with outlandish1 doctrines like innumerable Gods, people living on the sun, or special underwear that you can't take off2. But I am curious what lies at the "other end of the spectrum"; are there any Mormon doctrines which have been so embraced by Protestants as to shape their beliefs?

That is, are there any common Protestant beliefs which have their origin in Mormon teachings?

The reason I ask is:

  • Like it or not, modern Protestant thinking is influenced by our culture

  • Mormonism is a significant part of our culture

  • I am curious if "A+B=C", so to speak; has Mormonism had any significant impact on the shaping of Protestant thinking?


[1] My use of the word 'outlandish' here is not meant to be inflammatory. Such ideas are commonly viewed by Protestants as 'outlandish' (foreign, strange, etc.); I realize they may not seem outlandish to Mormons, and I realize that many Protestant doctrines would seem outlandish to non-Protestants.

[2] Please note that these are my words, based on things I've heard Protestants say - not the words of modern Mormon theologians.

    Tweeted twitter.com/#!/StackChristian/status/227713990908866560
2 Attempting to dampen the "inflammatoriness"; added 4 characters in body
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Protestants often associate Mormonism with outlandish*outlandish1 doctrines like innumerable Gods, people living on the sun, or special underwear that you can't take off2. But I am curious what lies at the "other end of the spectrum"; are there any Mormon doctrines which have been so embracedembraced by Protestants as to shape their beliefs?

That is, are there any common Protestant beliefs which have their origin in Mormon teachings?

The reason I ask is:

  • Culture plays a big part in how we think of God, Church, Scripture, etc.

  • Mormonism is a significant part of our culture

  • I am curious if "A+B=C", so to speak; has Mormonism had any significant impact on the shaping of Protestant thinking?


**This is not meant to be inflammatory. These doctrines are commonly viewed by Protestants as 'outlandish'[1] (foreign, strange, etc.); I realize they may not seem outlandish to Mormons, and I realize that many Protestant doctrines would seem outlandish to non-Protestants.*My use of the word 'outlandish' here is not meant to be inflammatory. Such ideas are commonly viewed by Protestants as 'outlandish' (foreign, strange, etc.); I realize they may not seem outlandish to Mormons, and I realize that many Protestant doctrines would seem outlandish to non-Protestants.

[2] Please note that these are my words, based on things I've heard Protestants say - not the words of modern Mormon theologians.

Protestants often associate Mormonism with outlandish* doctrines like innumerable Gods, people living on the sun, or special underwear that you can't take off. But I am curious what lies at the "other end of the spectrum"; are there any Mormon doctrines which have been so embraced by Protestants as to shape their beliefs?

That is, are there any common Protestant beliefs which have their origin in Mormon teachings?

The reason I ask is:

  • Culture plays a big part in how we think of God, Church, Scripture, etc.

  • Mormonism is a significant part of our culture

  • I am curious if "A+B=C", so to speak; has Mormonism had any significant impact on the shaping of Protestant thinking?


**This is not meant to be inflammatory. These doctrines are commonly viewed by Protestants as 'outlandish' (foreign, strange, etc.); I realize they may not seem outlandish to Mormons, and I realize that many Protestant doctrines would seem outlandish to non-Protestants.*

Protestants often associate Mormonism with outlandish1 doctrines like innumerable Gods, people living on the sun, or special underwear that you can't take off2. But I am curious what lies at the "other end of the spectrum"; are there any Mormon doctrines which have been so embraced by Protestants as to shape their beliefs?

That is, are there any common Protestant beliefs which have their origin in Mormon teachings?

The reason I ask is:

  • Culture plays a big part in how we think of God, Church, Scripture, etc.

  • Mormonism is a significant part of our culture

  • I am curious if "A+B=C", so to speak; has Mormonism had any significant impact on the shaping of Protestant thinking?


[1] My use of the word 'outlandish' here is not meant to be inflammatory. Such ideas are commonly viewed by Protestants as 'outlandish' (foreign, strange, etc.); I realize they may not seem outlandish to Mormons, and I realize that many Protestant doctrines would seem outlandish to non-Protestants.

[2] Please note that these are my words, based on things I've heard Protestants say - not the words of modern Mormon theologians.

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Are there any Protestant beliefs which have their roots in Mormon doctrines?

Protestants often associate Mormonism with outlandish* doctrines like innumerable Gods, people living on the sun, or special underwear that you can't take off. But I am curious what lies at the "other end of the spectrum"; are there any Mormon doctrines which have been so embraced by Protestants as to shape their beliefs?

That is, are there any common Protestant beliefs which have their origin in Mormon teachings?

The reason I ask is:

  • Culture plays a big part in how we think of God, Church, Scripture, etc.

  • Mormonism is a significant part of our culture

  • I am curious if "A+B=C", so to speak; has Mormonism had any significant impact on the shaping of Protestant thinking?


**This is not meant to be inflammatory. These doctrines are commonly viewed by Protestants as 'outlandish' (foreign, strange, etc.); I realize they may not seem outlandish to Mormons, and I realize that many Protestant doctrines would seem outlandish to non-Protestants.*