3 replaced http://christianity.stackexchange.com/ with https://christianity.stackexchange.com/
source | link

There are two aspects to the Biblical basis for this doctrine.

1) Rationale

There is a rationale, theological argument that God is just, and would not impute sin where there was no knowledge of sin or no opportunity to choose Him. This is based on Old Testament passages like Proverbs 24:12, as well as New Testament passages such as:

sin is not imputed when there is no law -Romans 5:13

2) Precedence

But the main argument comes from a story in 2 Samuel 12:14-31 in which God takes the life of David's newborn son as punishment for his sin. After his son is dead, David makes the following statement:

But now he has died; why should I fast? Can I bring him back again? I will go to him, but he will not return to me.” -v.23

This is generally taken to mean that David expected to see his son again in Heaven some day, even though he died as an infant, and never had the chance to accept or reject God.

The obvious question though, is why did David expect to see his son again? The popular answer, of course, is that all such children go to Heaven. After all, the alternative is unthinkable - surely God would not judge an infant with eternity in Hell if they never had a chance to hear the gospel.

Assessment

For what it's worth, I think the doctrine of an "age of accountability" is based on a lot of misunderstandings and bad hermeneutics. However, we can rest assured that God is perfect in His love, justice, and wisdom. For an alternative view to the "age of accountability" see my post herehere.

There are two aspects to the Biblical basis for this doctrine.

1) Rationale

There is a rationale, theological argument that God is just, and would not impute sin where there was no knowledge of sin or no opportunity to choose Him. This is based on Old Testament passages like Proverbs 24:12, as well as New Testament passages such as:

sin is not imputed when there is no law -Romans 5:13

2) Precedence

But the main argument comes from a story in 2 Samuel 12:14-31 in which God takes the life of David's newborn son as punishment for his sin. After his son is dead, David makes the following statement:

But now he has died; why should I fast? Can I bring him back again? I will go to him, but he will not return to me.” -v.23

This is generally taken to mean that David expected to see his son again in Heaven some day, even though he died as an infant, and never had the chance to accept or reject God.

The obvious question though, is why did David expect to see his son again? The popular answer, of course, is that all such children go to Heaven. After all, the alternative is unthinkable - surely God would not judge an infant with eternity in Hell if they never had a chance to hear the gospel.

Assessment

For what it's worth, I think the doctrine of an "age of accountability" is based on a lot of misunderstandings and bad hermeneutics. However, we can rest assured that God is perfect in His love, justice, and wisdom. For an alternative view to the "age of accountability" see my post here.

There are two aspects to the Biblical basis for this doctrine.

1) Rationale

There is a rationale, theological argument that God is just, and would not impute sin where there was no knowledge of sin or no opportunity to choose Him. This is based on Old Testament passages like Proverbs 24:12, as well as New Testament passages such as:

sin is not imputed when there is no law -Romans 5:13

2) Precedence

But the main argument comes from a story in 2 Samuel 12:14-31 in which God takes the life of David's newborn son as punishment for his sin. After his son is dead, David makes the following statement:

But now he has died; why should I fast? Can I bring him back again? I will go to him, but he will not return to me.” -v.23

This is generally taken to mean that David expected to see his son again in Heaven some day, even though he died as an infant, and never had the chance to accept or reject God.

The obvious question though, is why did David expect to see his son again? The popular answer, of course, is that all such children go to Heaven. After all, the alternative is unthinkable - surely God would not judge an infant with eternity in Hell if they never had a chance to hear the gospel.

Assessment

For what it's worth, I think the doctrine of an "age of accountability" is based on a lot of misunderstandings and bad hermeneutics. However, we can rest assured that God is perfect in His love, justice, and wisdom. For an alternative view to the "age of accountability" see my post here.

2 added 2 characters in body
source | link

There are two aspects to the Biblical basis for this doctrine.

1) RationalRationale

There is a rationalrationale, theological argument that God is just, and would not impute sin where there was no knowledge of sin or no opportunity to choose Him. This is based on Old Testament passages like Proverbs 24:12, as well as New Testament passages such as:

sin is not imputed when there is no law -Romans 5:13

2) Precedence

But the main argument comes from a story in 2 Samuel 12:14-31 in which God takes the life of David's newborn son as punishment for his sin. After his son is dead, David makes the following statement:

But now he has died; why should I fast? Can I bring him back again? I will go to him, but he will not return to me.” -v.23

This is generally taken to mean that David expected to see his son again in Heaven some day, even though he died as an infant, and never had the chance to accept or reject God.

The obvious question though, is why did David expect to see his son again? The popular answer, of course, is that all such children go to Heaven. After all, the alternative is unthinkable - surely God would not judge an infant with eternity in Hell if they never had a chance to hear the gospel.

Assessment

For what it's worth, I think the doctrine of an "age of accountability" is based on a lot of misunderstandings and bad hermeneutics. However, we can rest assured that God is perfect in His love, justice, and wisdom. For an alternative view to the "age of accountability" see my post here.

There are two aspects to the Biblical basis for this doctrine.

1) Rational

There is a rational, theological argument that God is just, and would not impute sin where there was no knowledge of sin or no opportunity to choose Him. This is based on Old Testament passages like Proverbs 24:12, as well as New Testament passages such as:

sin is not imputed when there is no law -Romans 5:13

2) Precedence

But the main argument comes from a story in 2 Samuel 12:14-31 in which God takes the life of David's newborn son as punishment for his sin. After his son is dead, David makes the following statement:

But now he has died; why should I fast? Can I bring him back again? I will go to him, but he will not return to me.” -v.23

This is generally taken to mean that David expected to see his son again in Heaven some day, even though he died as an infant, and never had the chance to accept or reject God.

The obvious question though, is why did David expect to see his son again? The popular answer, of course, is that all such children go to Heaven. After all, the alternative is unthinkable - surely God would not judge an infant with eternity in Hell if they never had a chance to hear the gospel.

Assessment

For what it's worth, I think the doctrine of an "age of accountability" is based on a lot of misunderstandings and bad hermeneutics. However, we can rest assured that God is perfect in His love, justice, and wisdom. For an alternative view to the "age of accountability" see my post here.

There are two aspects to the Biblical basis for this doctrine.

1) Rationale

There is a rationale, theological argument that God is just, and would not impute sin where there was no knowledge of sin or no opportunity to choose Him. This is based on Old Testament passages like Proverbs 24:12, as well as New Testament passages such as:

sin is not imputed when there is no law -Romans 5:13

2) Precedence

But the main argument comes from a story in 2 Samuel 12:14-31 in which God takes the life of David's newborn son as punishment for his sin. After his son is dead, David makes the following statement:

But now he has died; why should I fast? Can I bring him back again? I will go to him, but he will not return to me.” -v.23

This is generally taken to mean that David expected to see his son again in Heaven some day, even though he died as an infant, and never had the chance to accept or reject God.

The obvious question though, is why did David expect to see his son again? The popular answer, of course, is that all such children go to Heaven. After all, the alternative is unthinkable - surely God would not judge an infant with eternity in Hell if they never had a chance to hear the gospel.

Assessment

For what it's worth, I think the doctrine of an "age of accountability" is based on a lot of misunderstandings and bad hermeneutics. However, we can rest assured that God is perfect in His love, justice, and wisdom. For an alternative view to the "age of accountability" see my post here.

1
source | link

There are two aspects to the Biblical basis for this doctrine.

1) Rational

There is a rational, theological argument that God is just, and would not impute sin where there was no knowledge of sin or no opportunity to choose Him. This is based on Old Testament passages like Proverbs 24:12, as well as New Testament passages such as:

sin is not imputed when there is no law -Romans 5:13

2) Precedence

But the main argument comes from a story in 2 Samuel 12:14-31 in which God takes the life of David's newborn son as punishment for his sin. After his son is dead, David makes the following statement:

But now he has died; why should I fast? Can I bring him back again? I will go to him, but he will not return to me.” -v.23

This is generally taken to mean that David expected to see his son again in Heaven some day, even though he died as an infant, and never had the chance to accept or reject God.

The obvious question though, is why did David expect to see his son again? The popular answer, of course, is that all such children go to Heaven. After all, the alternative is unthinkable - surely God would not judge an infant with eternity in Hell if they never had a chance to hear the gospel.

Assessment

For what it's worth, I think the doctrine of an "age of accountability" is based on a lot of misunderstandings and bad hermeneutics. However, we can rest assured that God is perfect in His love, justice, and wisdom. For an alternative view to the "age of accountability" see my post here.