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In the Gospel of John, we see the 'Godhead' repeatedly displayed. As a disclaimer, I would say first that trying to use a single verse to explain God is both incomplete and dangerous in that it can cause a person to be on a slippery slope--humanizing God.

  • As a disclaimer, I would say first that trying to use a single verse to explain God is both incomplete and dangerous in that it can cause a person to be on a slippery slope--humanizing God.

With that said, John 1 v.1 identifies Jesus as the Word, that He was with God in the beginning, and that He was (is) God. V.3 says He made everything (ref. HEB 11:3), v.10 says He was (now) in the world, and v.14 that the 'Word' was made flesh. 

For Jesus to pray to the Father shows He gave up His heavenly place to take on human form to fulfill both God's plan and prophesies spoken of before. V.2 says He was with God (emphasis mine). Genesis says that God created the heavens and the earth; it also clearly says that God 'said' (spoken Word), and it happened. 

Genesis also says 'the Spirit of God' moved: again referencing the Truine aspect of God. Again, we can see it in Genesis 2:7, in that we were made in His image: created of something physical (dust of the earth), something spiritual (the breath of life), and something soulish (a living soul). I use 'soulish because a better word escapes me now, and I'm not nearly as educated as many of you probably are. However, God the Father is often associated with the mind, will, and emotions as opposed to spirit or body.

To preface, Romans 1:19-22 tells us that (1) that which can be known of God is manifest in (them); (2) God has shown it; (3) the invisible things of God are clearly seen from the creation of the world (whether you interpret this to be 'from the beginning' or 'by the examples of creation' it still shows He made it possible for us to see it); (4) His eternal power and Godhead are revealed to us. Having said this, human beings are body, soul, and spirit (Gen.2:7), and we are made in His Image (Gen.1:26-27). 

Time would expire to include every reference in the Old Testament of God's mind, will, and emotions, an integral factor in understanding the Godhead and how it is demonstrated in His ultimate creation, MAN. 

Not only does the scripture show that the Son is the Creator, but it also shows the 'physical'physica' aspect in the New Testament by the birth and life of Jesus. The repeated references in scripture to the Spirit of God, separate from the Father, demonstrate that although He is unknowable in His entirety while we are on earth, as per Romans, the Godhead is reflected in His complex associations and operations throughout human history. In a similar fashion that we can imagine something, and then create it, but we are not 'different' entities in so doing, so is God as we are made in His image. 

Before someone strikes the Spirit part of this type of analogy, I'll posit the HE is the Creator, we the creation, and it is thus completely comprehensible that we cannot send our spirit out to perform actions--that would make us equal with God. The 'spirit' portion of this type of analogy is supported by His 'making' us a living soul by the breath of life (spirit), thereby completing the truine-aspect of corruptible man made in the image of the Incorruptible God. Here I need to close by reminding myself what it says in I Corinthians 1:25, 27-29, and I Corinthians 13:12...that God's far more knowledgeable and wiser than I, and I only see part, only as much as He deemed necessary in order for me to follow...otherwise, if I knew everything, it wouldn't be faith...

Thanks for reading; I'm now ready to hear what wiser folk have to say. 

In the Gospel of John, we see the 'Godhead' repeatedly displayed. As a disclaimer, I would say first that trying to use a single verse to explain God is both incomplete and dangerous in that it can cause a person to be on a slippery slope--humanizing God. With that said, John 1 v.1 identifies Jesus as the Word, that He was with God in the beginning, and that He was (is) God. V.3 says He made everything (ref. HEB 11:3), v.10 says He was (now) in the world, and v.14 that the 'Word' was made flesh. For Jesus to pray to the Father shows He gave up His heavenly place to take on human form to fulfill both God's plan and prophesies spoken of before. V.2 says He was with God (emphasis mine). Genesis says that God created the heavens and the earth; it also clearly says that God 'said' (spoken Word), and it happened. Genesis also says 'the Spirit of God' moved: again referencing the Truine aspect of God. Again, we can see it in Genesis 2:7, in that we were made in His image: created of something physical (dust of the earth), something spiritual (the breath of life), and something soulish (a living soul). I use 'soulish because a better word escapes me now, and I'm not nearly as educated as many of you probably are. However, God the Father is often associated with the mind, will, and emotions as opposed to spirit or body.

To preface, Romans 1:19-22 tells us that (1) that which can be known of God is manifest in (them); (2) God has shown it; (3) the invisible things of God are clearly seen from the creation of the world (whether you interpret this to be 'from the beginning' or 'by the examples of creation' it still shows He made it possible for us to see it); (4) His eternal power and Godhead are revealed to us. Having said this, human beings are body, soul, and spirit (Gen.2:7), and we are made in His Image (Gen.1:26-27). Time would expire to include every reference in the Old Testament of God's mind, will, and emotions, an integral factor in understanding the Godhead and how it is demonstrated in His ultimate creation, MAN. Not only does the scripture show that the Son is the Creator, but it also shows the 'physical aspect in the New Testament by the birth and life of Jesus. The repeated references in scripture to the Spirit of God, separate from the Father, demonstrate that although He is unknowable in His entirety while we are on earth, as per Romans, the Godhead is reflected in His complex associations and operations throughout human history. In a similar fashion that we can imagine something, and then create it, but we are not 'different' entities in so doing, so is God as we are made in His image. Before someone strikes the Spirit part of this type of analogy, I'll posit the HE is the Creator, we the creation, and it is thus completely comprehensible that we cannot send our spirit out to perform actions--that would make us equal with God. The 'spirit' portion of this type of analogy is supported by His 'making' us a living soul by the breath of life (spirit), thereby completing the truine-aspect of corruptible man made in the image of the Incorruptible God. Here I need to close by reminding myself what it says in I Corinthians 1:25, 27-29, and I Corinthians 13:12...that God's far more knowledgeable and wiser than I, and I only see part, only as much as He deemed necessary in order for me to follow...otherwise, if I knew everything, it wouldn't be faith...

Thanks for reading; I'm now ready to hear what wiser folk have to say.

In the Gospel of John, we see the 'Godhead' repeatedly displayed.

  • As a disclaimer, I would say first that trying to use a single verse to explain God is both incomplete and dangerous in that it can cause a person to be on a slippery slope--humanizing God.

With that said, John 1 v.1 identifies Jesus as the Word, that He was with God in the beginning, and that He was (is) God. V.3 says He made everything (ref. HEB 11:3), v.10 says He was (now) in the world, and v.14 that the 'Word' was made flesh. 

For Jesus to pray to the Father shows He gave up His heavenly place to take on human form to fulfill both God's plan and prophesies spoken of before. V.2 says He was with God (emphasis mine). Genesis says that God created the heavens and the earth; it also clearly says that God 'said' (spoken Word), and it happened. 

Genesis also says 'the Spirit of God' moved: again referencing the Truine aspect of God. Again, we can see it in Genesis 2:7, in that we were made in His image: created of something physical (dust of the earth), something spiritual (the breath of life), and something soulish (a living soul). I use 'soulish because a better word escapes me now, and I'm not nearly as educated as many of you probably are. However, God the Father is often associated with the mind, will, and emotions as opposed to spirit or body.

To preface, Romans 1:19-22 tells us that (1) that which can be known of God is manifest in (them); (2) God has shown it; (3) the invisible things of God are clearly seen from the creation of the world (whether you interpret this to be 'from the beginning' or 'by the examples of creation' it still shows He made it possible for us to see it); (4) His eternal power and Godhead are revealed to us. Having said this, human beings are body, soul, and spirit (Gen.2:7), and we are made in His Image (Gen.1:26-27). 

Time would expire to include every reference in the Old Testament of God's mind, will, and emotions, an integral factor in understanding the Godhead and how it is demonstrated in His ultimate creation, MAN. 

Not only does the scripture show that the Son is the Creator, but it also shows the 'physica' aspect in the New Testament by the birth and life of Jesus. The repeated references in scripture to the Spirit of God, separate from the Father, demonstrate that although He is unknowable in His entirety while we are on earth, as per Romans, the Godhead is reflected in His complex associations and operations throughout human history. In a similar fashion that we can imagine something, and then create it, but we are not 'different' entities in so doing, so is God as we are made in His image. 

Before someone strikes the Spirit part of this type of analogy, I'll posit the HE is the Creator, we the creation, and it is thus completely comprehensible that we cannot send our spirit out to perform actions--that would make us equal with God. The 'spirit' portion of this type of analogy is supported by His 'making' us a living soul by the breath of life (spirit), thereby completing the truine-aspect of corruptible man made in the image of the Incorruptible God. Here I need to close by reminding myself what it says in I Corinthians 1:25, 27-29, and I Corinthians 13:12...that God's far more knowledgeable and wiser than I, and I only see part, only as much as He deemed necessary in order for me to follow...otherwise, if I knew everything, it wouldn't be faith... 

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In the Gospel of John, we see the 'Godhead' repeatedly displayed. As a disclaimer, I would say first that trying to use a single verse to explain God is both incomplete and dangerous in that it can cause a person to be on a slippery slope--humanizing God. With that said, John 1 v.1 identifies Jesus as the Word, that He was with God in the beginning, and that He was (is) God. V.3 says He made everything (ref. HEB 11:3), v.10 says He was (now) in the world, and v.14 that the 'Word' was made flesh. For Jesus to pray to the Father shows He gave up His heavenly place to take on human form to fulfill both God's plan and prophesies spoken of before. V.2 says He was with God (emphasis mine). Genesis says that God created the heavens and the earth; it also clearly says that God 'said' (spoken Word), and it happened. Genesis also says 'the Spirit of God' moved: again referencing the Truine aspect of God. Again, we can see it in Genesis 2:7, in that we were made in His image: created of something physical (dust of the earth), something spiritual (the breath of life), and something soulish (a living soul). I use 'soulish because a better word escapes me now, and I'm not nearly as educated as many of you probably are. However, God the Father is often associated with the mind, will, and emotions as opposed to spirit or body.

Back to John. John 15:26 shows us Jesus--God as Man--telling that when He returns to the Father He will send the Spirit, which is from the Father. Again, in John 16:7-16, Jesus tells of what He will do and why, placing significant distinction between the three.

These are only examples from a single book, and arguably, a single author, and outside of Genesis, New Testament-only which would not satisfy those who do not believe the Messiah has already been here once. It may also help to make the arguably weak comparison to us made in His Image, albeit, taken from a strictly intellectual position fails to paint a full picture.

To preface, Romans 1:19-22 tells us that (1) that which can be known of God is manifest in (them); (2) God has shown it; (3) the invisible things of God are clearly seen from the creation of the world (whether you interpret this to be 'from the beginning' or 'by the examples of creation' it still shows He made it possible for us to see it); (4) His eternal power and Godhead are revealed to us. Having said this, human beings are body, soul, and spirit (Gen.2:7), and we are made in His Image (Gen.1:26-27). Time would expire to include every reference in the Old Testament of God's mind, will, and emotions, an integral factor in understanding the Godhead and how it is demonstrated in His ultimate creation, MAN. Not only does the scripture show that the Son is the Creator, but it also shows the 'physical aspect in the New Testament by the birth and life of Jesus. The repeated references in scripture to the Spirit of God, separate from the Father, demonstrate that although He is unknowable in His entirety while we are on earth, as per Romans, the Godhead is reflected in His complex associations and operations throughout human history. In a similar fashion that we can imagine something, and then create it, but we are not 'different' entities in so doing, so is God as we are made in His image. Before someone strikes the Spirit part of this type of analogy, I'll posit the HE is the Creator, we the creation, and it is thus completely comprehensible that we cannot send our spirit out to perform actions--that would make us equal with God. The 'spirit' portion of this type of analogy is supported by His 'making' us a living soul by the breath of life (spirit), thereby completing the truine-aspect of corruptible man made in the image of the Incorruptible God. Here I need to close by reminding myself what it says in I Corinthians 1:25, 27-29, and I Corinthians 13:12...that God's far more knowledgeable and wiser than I, and I only see part, only as much as He deemed necessary in order for me to follow...otherwise, if I knew everything, it wouldn't be faith...

Thanks for reading; I'm now ready to hear what wiser folk have to say.