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Some claim that dividing the law in three parts is "arbitrary and without any textual support." However, clear Biblical arguments have been made against this.

  1. God, Himself, drew a distinction between the laws when He chose to write the moral law, the ten commandments, with His own finger (Deu 9:10), while allowing Moses to transcribe the other laws in Moses' Book of Laws.

  2. Even the placement of these laws are different. The ten commandments are placed inside the ark of the covenant, under the mercy seat (Hebrew 9:4), while the Book of Law is placed beside the ark of the covenant (Deu 31:26).

  3. In the same verse (Deu 31:26), the Book of Law is referred to as "a witness against you". Paul later refers to this when describing the ordinances "against us", blotted out and nailed to the cross, because it was "a shadow of things to come" (Col 2:14, 17).

  4. In contrast, the ten commandments is perpetual, because it is the great law of love expanded. Love God and love your neighbour is also repeated in the New Testament. Most of the ten commandment is also repeated in the New Testament. Near the close of history, at the seventh trumpet, the Ark of the Covenant is still clearly seen in heaven (Rev 11:19).

  5. Even thinking in terms of the laws before sin and the laws after sin, the distinction is clear. The moral law, the great law of love, the changeless character of God, always existed and always will be. The other set of laws, that pointed to Jesus as saviour would never have been needed when there was no sin. When Jesus died on the cross as the true lamb of God, the veil of the holiest compartment was ripped apart by God, signalling the end of ceremonies.

  6. Hebrew 7:12 talks about "a change of law". The ceremonial law including the priesthood of the order of Aaron is finished (Hebrew 7:11-12). Instead, Jesus is now our high priest under the order of Melsisedec, offering only one sacrifice once and for all (Heb 9:25-26). Despite the laws in the old testamentOld Testament (Exo 29:9) requiring that Aaron and his sons will be high priests forever, we now see a change of law because the first set was highly symbolic and therefore ceremonial.

Therefore, evidences are ample Biblically that there are at least two main sets of law. First type - moral in nature, based on the perpetual law of love, designed to be taken internally and written in the heart (Rev 14:12). Second type - symbolic in nature, pointed to Jesus, changed.

Some claim that dividing the law in three parts is "arbitrary and without any textual support." However, clear Biblical arguments have been made against this.

  1. God, Himself, drew a distinction between the laws when He chose to write the moral law, the ten commandments, with His own finger (Deu 9:10), while allowing Moses to transcribe the other laws in Moses' Book of Laws.

  2. Even the placement of these laws are different. The ten commandments are placed inside the ark of the covenant, under the mercy seat (Hebrew 9:4), while the Book of Law is placed beside the ark of the covenant (Deu 31:26).

  3. In the same verse (Deu 31:26), the Book of Law is referred to as "a witness against you". Paul later refers to this when describing the ordinances "against us", blotted out and nailed to the cross, because it was "a shadow of things to come" (Col 2:14, 17).

  4. In contrast, the ten commandments is perpetual, because it is the great law of love expanded. Love God and love your neighbour is also repeated in the New Testament. Most of the ten commandment is also repeated in the New Testament. Near the close of history, at the seventh trumpet, the Ark of the Covenant is still clearly seen in heaven (Rev 11:19).

  5. Even thinking in terms of the laws before sin and the laws after sin, the distinction is clear. The moral law, the great law of love, the changeless character of God, always existed and always will be. The other set of laws, that pointed to Jesus as saviour would never have been needed when there was no sin. When Jesus died on the cross as the true lamb of God, the veil of holiest compartment was ripped apart by God, signalling the end of ceremonies.

  6. Hebrew 7:12 talks about "a change of law". The ceremonial law including the priesthood of the order of Aaron is finished (Hebrew 7:11-12). Instead, Jesus is now our high priest under the order of Melsisedec, offering only one sacrifice once and for all (Heb 9:25-26). Despite the laws in the old testament (Exo 29:9) requiring that Aaron and his sons will be high priests forever, we now see a change of law because the first set was highly symbolic and therefore ceremonial.

Therefore, evidences are ample Biblically that there are at least two main sets of law. First type - moral in nature, based on the perpetual law of love, designed to be taken internally and written in the heart (Rev 14:12). Second type - symbolic in nature, pointed to Jesus, changed.

Some claim that dividing the law in three parts is "arbitrary and without any textual support." However, clear Biblical arguments have been made against this.

  1. God, Himself, drew a distinction between the laws when He chose to write the moral law, the ten commandments, with His own finger (Deu 9:10), while allowing Moses to transcribe the other laws in Moses' Book of Laws.

  2. Even the placement of these laws are different. The ten commandments are placed inside the ark of the covenant, under the mercy seat (Hebrew 9:4), while the Book of Law is placed beside the ark of the covenant (Deu 31:26).

  3. In the same verse (Deu 31:26), the Book of Law is referred to as "a witness against you". Paul later refers to this when describing the ordinances "against us", blotted out and nailed to the cross, because it was "a shadow of things to come" (Col 2:14, 17).

  4. In contrast, the ten commandments is perpetual, because it is the great law of love expanded. Love God and love your neighbour is also repeated in the New Testament. Most of the ten commandment is also repeated in the New Testament. Near the close of history, at the seventh trumpet, the Ark of the Covenant is still clearly seen in heaven (Rev 11:19).

  5. Even thinking in terms of the laws before sin and the laws after sin, the distinction is clear. The moral law, the great law of love, the changeless character of God, always existed and always will be. The other set of laws, that pointed to Jesus as saviour would never have been needed when there was no sin. When Jesus died on the cross as the true lamb of God, the veil of the holiest compartment was ripped apart by God, signalling the end of ceremonies.

  6. Hebrew 7:12 talks about "a change of law". The ceremonial law including the priesthood of the order of Aaron is finished (Hebrew 7:11-12). Instead, Jesus is now our high priest under the order of Melsisedec, offering only one sacrifice once and for all (Heb 9:25-26). Despite the laws in the Old Testament (Exo 29:9) requiring that Aaron and his sons be high priests forever, we now see a change of law because the first set was highly symbolic and therefore ceremonial.

Therefore, evidences are ample Biblically that there are at least two main sets of law. First type - moral in nature, based on the perpetual law of love, designed to be taken internally and written in the heart (Rev 14:12). Second type - symbolic in nature, pointed to Jesus, changed.

2 deleted 1 character in body
source | link

Some claim that dividing the law in three parts is "arbitrary and without any textual support." However, clear Biblical arguments have been made against this.

  1. God, Himself, drew a distinction between the laws when He chose to write the moral law, the ten commandments, with His own finger (Deu 9:10), while allowing Moses to transcribe the other laws in Moses' Book of Laws.

  2. Even the placement of these laws are different. The ten commandments are placed inside the ark of the covenant, under the mercy seat (Hebrew 9:4), while the Book of Law is placed beside the ark of the covenant (Deu 31:26).

  3. In the same verse (Deu 31:26), the Book of Law is referred to as "a witness against you". Paul later refers to this when describing the ordinances "against us", blotted out and nailed to the cross, because it was "a shadow of things to come" (Col 2:14, 17).

  4. In contrast, the ten commandments is perpetual, because it is the great law of love expanded. Love God and love your neighbour is also repeated in the New Testament. Most of the ten commandment is also repeated in the New Testament. Near the close of history, at the seventh trumpet, the Ark of the Covenant is still clearly seen in heaven (Rev 11:19).

  5. Even thinking in terms of the laws before sin and the laws after sin, the distinction is clear. The moral law, the great law of love, the changeless character of God, always existed and always will be. The other set of laws, that pointed to Jesus as saviour would never have been needed hadwhen there not beenwas no sin. When Jesus died on the cross as the true lamb of God, the veil of holiest compartment was ripped apart by God, signalling the end of ceremonies.

  6. Hebrew 7:12 talks about "a change of law". The ceremonial law including the priesthood of the order of Aaron is finished (Hebrew 7:11-12). Instead, Jesus is now our high priest under the order of Melsisedec, offering only one sacrifice once and for all (Heb 9:25-26). Despite the laws in the old testament (Exo 29:9) requiring that Aaron and his sons will be high priests forever, we now see a change of law because the first set was highly symbolic and therefore ceremonial.

Therefore, evidences are ample Biblically that there are at least two main sets of law. First type - moral in nature, based on the perpetual law of love, designed to be taken internally and written in the heart (Rev 14:12). Second type - symbolic in nature, pointed to Jesus, changed.

Some claim that dividing the law in three parts is "arbitrary and without any textual support." However, clear Biblical arguments have been made against this.

  1. God, Himself, drew a distinction between the laws when He chose to write the moral law, the ten commandments, with His own finger (Deu 9:10), while allowing Moses to transcribe the other laws in Moses' Book of Laws.

  2. Even the placement of these laws are different. The ten commandments are placed inside the ark of the covenant, under the mercy seat (Hebrew 9:4), while the Book of Law is placed beside the ark of the covenant (Deu 31:26).

  3. In the same verse (Deu 31:26), the Book of Law is referred to as "a witness against you". Paul later refers to this when describing the ordinances "against us", blotted out and nailed to the cross, because it was "a shadow of things to come" (Col 2:14, 17).

  4. In contrast, the ten commandments is perpetual, because it is the great law of love expanded. Love God and love your neighbour is also repeated in the New Testament. Most of the ten commandment is also repeated in the New Testament. Near the close of history, at the seventh trumpet, the Ark of the Covenant is still clearly seen in heaven (Rev 11:19).

  5. Even thinking in terms of the laws before sin and the laws after sin, the distinction is clear. The moral law, the great law of love, the changeless character of God, always existed and always will be. The other set of laws, that pointed to Jesus as saviour would never have been needed had there not been sin. When Jesus died on the cross as the true lamb of God, the veil of holiest compartment was ripped apart by God, signalling the end of ceremonies.

  6. Hebrew 7:12 talks about "a change of law". The ceremonial law including the priesthood of the order of Aaron is finished (Hebrew 7:11-12). Instead, Jesus is now our high priest under the order of Melsisedec, offering only one sacrifice once and for all (Heb 9:25-26). Despite the laws in the old testament (Exo 29:9) requiring that Aaron and his sons will be high priests forever, we now see a change of law because the first set was highly symbolic and therefore ceremonial.

Therefore, evidences are ample Biblically that there are at least two main sets of law. First type - moral in nature, based on the perpetual law of love, designed to be taken internally and written in the heart (Rev 14:12). Second type - symbolic in nature, pointed to Jesus, changed.

Some claim that dividing the law in three parts is "arbitrary and without any textual support." However, clear Biblical arguments have been made against this.

  1. God, Himself, drew a distinction between the laws when He chose to write the moral law, the ten commandments, with His own finger (Deu 9:10), while allowing Moses to transcribe the other laws in Moses' Book of Laws.

  2. Even the placement of these laws are different. The ten commandments are placed inside the ark of the covenant, under the mercy seat (Hebrew 9:4), while the Book of Law is placed beside the ark of the covenant (Deu 31:26).

  3. In the same verse (Deu 31:26), the Book of Law is referred to as "a witness against you". Paul later refers to this when describing the ordinances "against us", blotted out and nailed to the cross, because it was "a shadow of things to come" (Col 2:14, 17).

  4. In contrast, the ten commandments is perpetual, because it is the great law of love expanded. Love God and love your neighbour is also repeated in the New Testament. Most of the ten commandment is also repeated in the New Testament. Near the close of history, at the seventh trumpet, the Ark of the Covenant is still clearly seen in heaven (Rev 11:19).

  5. Even thinking in terms of the laws before sin and the laws after sin, the distinction is clear. The moral law, the great law of love, the changeless character of God, always existed and always will be. The other set of laws, that pointed to Jesus as saviour would never have been needed when there was no sin. When Jesus died on the cross as the true lamb of God, the veil of holiest compartment was ripped apart by God, signalling the end of ceremonies.

  6. Hebrew 7:12 talks about "a change of law". The ceremonial law including the priesthood of the order of Aaron is finished (Hebrew 7:11-12). Instead, Jesus is now our high priest under the order of Melsisedec, offering only one sacrifice once and for all (Heb 9:25-26). Despite the laws in the old testament (Exo 29:9) requiring that Aaron and his sons will be high priests forever, we now see a change of law because the first set was highly symbolic and therefore ceremonial.

Therefore, evidences are ample Biblically that there are at least two main sets of law. First type - moral in nature, based on the perpetual law of love, designed to be taken internally and written in the heart (Rev 14:12). Second type - symbolic in nature, pointed to Jesus, changed.

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source | link

Some claim that dividing the law in three parts is "arbitrary and without any textual support." However, clear Biblical arguments have been made against this.

  1. God, Himself, drew a distinction between the laws when He chose to write the moral law, the ten commandments, with His own finger (Deu 9:10), while allowing Moses to transcribe the other laws in Moses' Book of Laws.

  2. Even the placement of these laws are different. The ten commandments are placed inside the ark of the covenant, under the mercy seat (Hebrew 9:4), while the Book of Law is placed beside the ark of the covenant (Deu 31:26).

  3. In the same verse (Deu 31:26), the Book of Law is referred to as "a witness against you". Paul later refers to this when describing the ordinances "against us", blotted out and nailed to the cross, because it was "a shadow of things to come" (Col 2:14, 17).

  4. In contrast, the ten commandments is perpetual, because it is the great law of love expanded. Love God and love your neighbour is also repeated in the New Testament. Most of the ten commandment is also repeated in the New Testament. Near the close of history, at the seventh trumpet, the Ark of the Covenant is still clearly seen in heaven (Rev 11:19).

  5. Even thinking in terms of the laws before sin and the laws after sin, the distinction is clear. The moral law, the great law of love, the changeless character of God, always existed and always will be. The other set of laws, that pointed to Jesus as saviour would never have been needed had there not been sin. When Jesus died on the cross as the true lamb of God, the veil of holiest compartment was ripped apart by God, signalling the end of ceremonies.

  6. Hebrew 7:12 talks about "a change of law". The ceremonial law including the priesthood of the order of Aaron is finished (Hebrew 7:11-12). Instead, Jesus is now our high priest under the order of Melsisedec, offering only one sacrifice once and for all (Heb 9:25-26). Despite the laws in the old testament (Exo 29:9) requiring that Aaron and his sons will be high priests forever, we now see a change of law because the first set was highly symbolic and therefore ceremonial.

Therefore, evidences are ample Biblically that there are at least two main sets of law. First type - moral in nature, based on the perpetual law of love, designed to be taken internally and written in the heart (Rev 14:12). Second type - symbolic in nature, pointed to Jesus, changed.