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I'm not familiar with the NLT, but in the KJV it says it a little bit differently: "the evening and the morning were the first (second, third, etc) day." And that's all it says. It doesn't say that these days were 24 hours long. It doesn't even say that they were all as long as each other. In fact, you'd have some difficulty claiming that the first two "days" meant the same thing as they do to us today, because we mark days by the sun, which didn't show up until the third sayday!

(This isn't as absurd as it sounds, BTW, if you consider this an account of a vision of the Creation, shown from the perspective of an observer on the Earth's surface, and not out in space somewhere. "Out in space somewhere" makes sense as a point of view to our generation, but certainly not to a nation of shepherds with no concept of science fiction! From the surface, at the very beginning, it would take quite a while before the skies became clear enough to see the sun and the moon, even though some light would filter through long before then.)

The problem is, the text doesn't go into much detail as to exactly what is meant. Some people have suggested that the Earth was created on God's time, where "one day is with the Lord as a thousand years" (2 Peter 3: 8), which in turn could mean literally 1000 years, or simply "an arbitrarily long period of time."

Personally, I find it more important to believe that God created the world, that he put us here upon it, and that he did it all for a reason, than to worry about the details of exactly how it was done or how long it took. I figure if He were to try to explain how He did it to me, I'd end up completely lost within the first five minutes anyway!

I'm not familiar with the NLT, but in the KJV it says it a little bit differently: "the evening and the morning were the first (second, third, etc) day." And that's all it says. It doesn't say that these days were 24 hours long. It doesn't even say that they were all as long as each other. In fact, you'd have some difficulty claiming that the first two "days" meant the same thing as they do to us today, because we mark days by the sun, which didn't show up until the third say!

(This isn't as absurd as it sounds, BTW, if you consider this an account of a vision of the Creation, shown from the perspective of an observer on the Earth's surface, and not out in space somewhere. "Out in space somewhere" makes sense as a point of view to our generation, but certainly not to a nation of shepherds with no concept of science fiction! From the surface, at the very beginning, it would take quite a while before the skies became clear enough to see the sun and the moon, even though some light would filter through long before then.)

The problem is, the text doesn't go into much detail as to exactly what is meant. Some people have suggested that the Earth was created on God's time, where "one day is with the Lord as a thousand years" (2 Peter 3: 8), which in turn could mean literally 1000 years, or simply "an arbitrarily long period of time."

Personally, I find it more important to believe that God created the world, that he put us here upon it, and that he did it all for a reason, than to worry about the details of exactly how it was done or how long it took. I figure if He were to try to explain how He did it to me, I'd end up completely lost within the first five minutes anyway!

I'm not familiar with the NLT, but in the KJV it says it a little bit differently: "the evening and the morning were the first (second, third, etc) day." And that's all it says. It doesn't say that these days were 24 hours long. It doesn't even say that they were all as long as each other. In fact, you'd have some difficulty claiming that the first two "days" meant the same thing as they do to us today, because we mark days by the sun, which didn't show up until the third day!

(This isn't as absurd as it sounds, BTW, if you consider this an account of a vision of the Creation, shown from the perspective of an observer on the Earth's surface, and not out in space somewhere. "Out in space somewhere" makes sense as a point of view to our generation, but certainly not to a nation of shepherds with no concept of science fiction! From the surface, at the very beginning, it would take quite a while before the skies became clear enough to see the sun and the moon, even though some light would filter through long before then.)

The problem is, the text doesn't go into much detail as to exactly what is meant. Some people have suggested that the Earth was created on God's time, where "one day is with the Lord as a thousand years" (2 Peter 3: 8), which in turn could mean literally 1000 years, or simply "an arbitrarily long period of time."

Personally, I find it more important to believe that God created the world, that he put us here upon it, and that he did it all for a reason, than to worry about the details of exactly how it was done or how long it took. I figure if He were to try to explain how He did it to me, I'd end up completely lost within the first five minutes anyway!

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I'm not familiar with the NLT, but in the KJV it says it a little bit differently: "the evening and the morning were the first (second, third, etc) day." And that's all it says. It doesn't say that these days were 24 hours long. It doesn't even say that they were all as long as each other. In fact, you'd have some difficulty claiming that the first two "days" meant the same thing as they do to us today, because we mark days by the sun, which didn't show up until the third say!

(This isn't as absurd as it sounds, BTW, if you consider this an account of a vision of the Creation, shown from the perspective of an observer on the Earth's surface, and not out in space somewhere. "Out in space somewhere" makes sense as a point of view to our generation, but certainly not to a nation of shepherds with no concept of science fiction! From the surface, at the very beginning, it would take quite a while before the skies became clear enough to see the sun and the moon, even though some light would filter through long before then.)

The problem is, the text doesn't go into much detail as to exactly what is meant. Some people have suggested that the Earth was created on God's time, where "one day is with the Lord as a thousand years" (2 Peter 3: 8), which in turn could mean literally 1000 years, or simply "an arbitrarily long period of time."

Personally, I find it more important to believe that God created the world, that he put us here upon it, and that he did it all for a reason, than to worry about the details of exactly how it was done or how long it took. I figure if He were to try to explain how He did it to me, I'd end up completely lost within the first five minutes anyway!