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The closest belief in antiquity to what you are suggesting is, I believe, Nestorianism, which taught more or less what you pose: that Christ was less than 100% God when He was Incarnate, but was otherwise divine. Arianism - the denial that Christ had any divine nature whatsoever - is a related belief, but not quite the same as what you are asking about.

The root of the Nestorian controversy seems to have been not begun directly with a deliberation of the Godhead, but rather over what the appropriate description for the Virgin Mary should be. Nestorians and proto-Nestorians following Theodore of Mopsuestia (5th century) objected to referring to Mary (in Greek) as Theotokos - "God-bearer". They insisted that she should be called instead Christotokos - "Christ-bearer".

Nestorianism, as another answer has alluded, was condemned by the Third Ecumenical Council in 431. A chief defender against Nestorius was the bishop Cyril of Alexandria, who wrote a 5-volume book against the Nestorian doctrine. These volumes contain extensive exegeses of relevant Scriptures, refuting Nestorius' own interpretation of various "proof texts".

The closest belief in antiquity to what you are suggesting is, I believe, Nestorianism, which taught more or less what you pose: that Christ was less than 100% God when He was Incarnate. Arianism - the denial that Christ had any divine nature whatsoever - is a related belief, but not quite the same as what you are asking about.

The root of the Nestorian controversy seems to have been not begun directly with a deliberation of the Godhead, but rather over what the appropriate description for the Virgin Mary should be. Nestorians and proto-Nestorians following Theodore of Mopsuestia (5th century) objected to referring to Mary (in Greek) as Theotokos - "God-bearer". They insisted that she should be called instead Christotokos - "Christ-bearer".

Nestorianism, as another answer has alluded, was condemned by the Third Ecumenical Council in 431. A chief defender against Nestorius was the bishop Cyril of Alexandria, who wrote a 5-volume book against the Nestorian doctrine. These volumes contain extensive exegeses of relevant Scriptures, refuting Nestorius' own interpretation of various "proof texts".

The closest belief in antiquity to what you are suggesting is, I believe, Nestorianism, which taught more or less what you pose: that Christ was less than 100% God when He was Incarnate, but was otherwise divine. Arianism - the denial that Christ had any divine nature whatsoever - is a related belief, but not quite the same as what you are asking about.

The root of the Nestorian controversy seems to have been not begun directly with a deliberation of the Godhead, but rather over what the appropriate description for the Virgin Mary should be. Nestorians and proto-Nestorians following Theodore of Mopsuestia (5th century) objected to referring to Mary (in Greek) as Theotokos - "God-bearer". They insisted that she should be called instead Christotokos - "Christ-bearer".

Nestorianism, as another answer has alluded, was condemned by the Third Ecumenical Council in 431. A chief defender against Nestorius was the bishop Cyril of Alexandria, who wrote a 5-volume book against the Nestorian doctrine. These volumes contain extensive exegeses of relevant Scriptures, refuting Nestorius' own interpretation of various "proof texts".

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The closest belief in antiquity to what you are suggesting is, I believe, Nestorianism, which taught more or less what you pose: that Christ was less than 100% God when He was Incarnate. Arianism - the denial that Christ had any divine nature whatsoever - is a related belief, but not quite the same as what you are asking about.

The root of the Nestorian controversy seems to have been not begun directly with a deliberation of the Godhead, but rather over what the appropriate description for the Virgin Mary should be. Nestorians and proto-Nestorians following Theodore of Mopsuestia (5th century) objected to referring to Mary (in Greek) as Theotokos - "God-bearer". They insisted that she should be called instead Christotokos - "Christ-bearer".

Nestorianism, as another answer has alluded, was condemned by the Third Ecumenical Council in 431. A chief defender against Nestorius was the bishop Cyril of Alexandria, who wrote a 5-volume book against the Nestorian doctrine. These volumes contain extensive exegeses of relevant Scriptures, refuting Nestorius' own interpretation of various "proof texts".