3 added 3 characters in body
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The Church documents on this refer to the dead (the souls in purgatory) in general terms. For example:

Pope Paul VI's Apostolic Constitution on IndulgencesApostolic Constitution on Indulgences says:

n.3—Partial as well as plenary indulgences can always be applied to the dead by way of suffrage.

cf. Fr. Hardon's Catholic Dictionary entry for "indulgence."

There is no reason why one cannot expiate for the sins of a specific soul (named or unnamed).


There are several examples of saints applying their sufferings to specific people. For example, from ch. 11 ¶15 of St. Vincent Ferrer: Angel of the Judgment by Fr. Andrew Pradel, O.P.:

[Saints] are not content with sharing the sufferings of their brethren, but joyfully take the whole on themselves. Thus the Seraphic Virgin of Siena [St. Catherine of Siena] took entirely on herself the pains of Purgatory which her father ought to have suffered; thus also did St. Michael-des-Saints of the Order of the Trinity, with God’s permission, undertake a malignant fever from which a friend of his was suffering. The Great Model of Saints gave the first example of this. “Surely He hath borne our infirmities,” says the prophet, “and carried our sorrows.” (Isaias 53:4).

Examples of this from the life of St. Vincent Ferrer are given in ibid. ch. 11.

The Church documents on this refer to the dead (the souls in purgatory) in general terms. For example:

Pope Paul VI's Apostolic Constitution on Indulgences says:

n.3—Partial as well as plenary indulgences can always be applied to the dead by way of suffrage.

cf. Fr. Hardon's Catholic Dictionary entry for "indulgence."

There is no reason why one cannot expiate for the sins of a specific soul (named or unnamed).


There are several examples of saints applying their sufferings to specific people. For example, from ch. 11 ¶15 of St. Vincent Ferrer: Angel of the Judgment by Fr. Andrew Pradel, O.P.:

[Saints] are not content with sharing the sufferings of their brethren, but joyfully take the whole on themselves. Thus the Seraphic Virgin of Siena [St. Catherine of Siena] took entirely on herself the pains of Purgatory which her father ought to have suffered; thus also did St. Michael-des-Saints of the Order of the Trinity, with God’s permission, undertake a malignant fever from which a friend of his was suffering. The Great Model of Saints gave the first example of this. “Surely He hath borne our infirmities,” says the prophet, “and carried our sorrows.” (Isaias 53:4).

Examples of this from the life of St. Vincent Ferrer are given in ibid. ch. 11.

The Church documents on this refer to the dead (the souls in purgatory) in general terms. For example:

Pope Paul VI's Apostolic Constitution on Indulgences says:

n.3—Partial as well as plenary indulgences can always be applied to the dead by way of suffrage.

cf. Fr. Hardon's Catholic Dictionary entry for "indulgence."

There is no reason why one cannot expiate for the sins of a specific soul (named or unnamed).


There are several examples of saints applying their sufferings to specific people. For example, from ch. 11 ¶15 of St. Vincent Ferrer: Angel of the Judgment by Fr. Andrew Pradel, O.P.:

[Saints] are not content with sharing the sufferings of their brethren, but joyfully take the whole on themselves. Thus the Seraphic Virgin of Siena [St. Catherine of Siena] took entirely on herself the pains of Purgatory which her father ought to have suffered; thus also did St. Michael-des-Saints of the Order of the Trinity, with God’s permission, undertake a malignant fever from which a friend of his was suffering. The Great Model of Saints gave the first example of this. “Surely He hath borne our infirmities,” says the prophet, “and carried our sorrows.” (Isaias 53:4).

Examples of this from the life of St. Vincent Ferrer are given in ibid. ch. 11.

2 added example of saints applying their suffrages to specific souls, either to a soul in purgatory or one still on earth
source | link

The Church documents on this refer to the dead (the souls in purgatory) in general terms. For example:

Pope Paul VI's Apostolic Constitution on Indulgences says:

n.3—Partial as well as plenary indulgences can always be applied to the dead by way of suffrage.

cf. Fr. Hardon's Catholic Dictionary entry for "indulgence."

There is no reason why one cannot expiate for the sins of a specific soul (named or unnamed).


There are several examples of saints applying their sufferings to specific people. For example, from ch. 11 ¶15 of St. Vincent Ferrer: Angel of the Judgment by Fr. Andrew Pradel, O.P.:

[Saints] are not content with sharing the sufferings of their brethren, but joyfully take the whole on themselves. Thus the Seraphic Virgin of Siena [St. Catherine of Siena] took entirely on herself the pains of Purgatory which her father ought to have suffered; thus also did St. Michael-des-Saints of the Order of the Trinity, with God’s permission, undertake a malignant fever from which a friend of his was suffering. The Great Model of Saints gave the first example of this. “Surely He hath borne our infirmities,” says the prophet, “and carried our sorrows.” (Isaias 53:4).

Examples of this from the life of St. Vincent Ferrer are given in ibid. ch. 11.

The Church documents on this refer to the dead (the souls in purgatory) in general terms. For example:

Pope Paul VI's Apostolic Constitution on Indulgences says:

n.3—Partial as well as plenary indulgences can always be applied to the dead by way of suffrage.

cf. Fr. Hardon's Catholic Dictionary entry for "indulgence."

There is no reason why one cannot expiate for the sins of a specific soul (named or unnamed).

The Church documents on this refer to the dead (the souls in purgatory) in general terms. For example:

Pope Paul VI's Apostolic Constitution on Indulgences says:

n.3—Partial as well as plenary indulgences can always be applied to the dead by way of suffrage.

cf. Fr. Hardon's Catholic Dictionary entry for "indulgence."

There is no reason why one cannot expiate for the sins of a specific soul (named or unnamed).


There are several examples of saints applying their sufferings to specific people. For example, from ch. 11 ¶15 of St. Vincent Ferrer: Angel of the Judgment by Fr. Andrew Pradel, O.P.:

[Saints] are not content with sharing the sufferings of their brethren, but joyfully take the whole on themselves. Thus the Seraphic Virgin of Siena [St. Catherine of Siena] took entirely on herself the pains of Purgatory which her father ought to have suffered; thus also did St. Michael-des-Saints of the Order of the Trinity, with God’s permission, undertake a malignant fever from which a friend of his was suffering. The Great Model of Saints gave the first example of this. “Surely He hath borne our infirmities,” says the prophet, “and carried our sorrows.” (Isaias 53:4).

Examples of this from the life of St. Vincent Ferrer are given in ibid. ch. 11.

1
source | link

The Church documents on this refer to the dead (the souls in purgatory) in general terms. For example:

Pope Paul VI's Apostolic Constitution on Indulgences says:

n.3—Partial as well as plenary indulgences can always be applied to the dead by way of suffrage.

cf. Fr. Hardon's Catholic Dictionary entry for "indulgence."

There is no reason why one cannot expiate for the sins of a specific soul (named or unnamed).