2 added 215 characters in body
source | link

The proper name Jesus /ˈdʒiːzəs/ used in the English language originates from the Latin form of the Greek name Ἰησοῦς (Iēsous), a rendition of the Hebrew Yeshua (ישוע), also having the variants Joshua or Jeshua. In a religious context, the name refers to Jesus, the central figure of Christianity.

Luke 1:31

You will conceive and give birth to a son, and you are to call him Jesus.

The angel actually said,

you are to call him Yeshua.

What is the Catholic explanation for translating Jesus's name? Jesus's name should be original because that's what the angel said his name is.

In my native language, we don't say "Juraj Krik". Do you know who is Juraj Krik? No! It's George Bush. Nobody actually knows him under the translated name either. Everyone knows him under his English name.

Why is it ok to translate Jesus's name? Doesn't the translation diminish the authenticity or even the authority of his name? Or what really matter is the person's individual attitude towards the name? Well, from the history we can see that it also matters when it comes to how we use the form, not just the content. We can also see that during exorcisms, I think they mostly use the Latin translation.

Note: Adam & Eve stayed the same almost in all languages. So if Jesus is new Adam, his name should be the same in all languages too.

The proper name Jesus /ˈdʒiːzəs/ used in the English language originates from the Latin form of the Greek name Ἰησοῦς (Iēsous), a rendition of the Hebrew Yeshua (ישוע), also having the variants Joshua or Jeshua. In a religious context, the name refers to Jesus, the central figure of Christianity.

Luke 1:31

You will conceive and give birth to a son, and you are to call him Jesus.

The angel actually said,

you are to call him Yeshua.

What is the Catholic explanation for translating Jesus's name? Jesus's name should be original because that's what the angel said his name is.

In my native language, we don't say "Juraj Krik". Do you know who is Juraj Krik? No! It's George Bush. Nobody actually knows him under the translated name either. Everyone knows him under his English name.

Why is it ok to translate Jesus's name? Doesn't the translation diminish the authenticity or even the authority of his name? Or what really matter is the person's individual attitude towards the name? Well, from the history we can see that it also matters when it comes to how we use the form, not just the content. We can also see that during exorcisms, I think they mostly use the Latin translation.

The proper name Jesus /ˈdʒiːzəs/ used in the English language originates from the Latin form of the Greek name Ἰησοῦς (Iēsous), a rendition of the Hebrew Yeshua (ישוע), also having the variants Joshua or Jeshua. In a religious context, the name refers to Jesus, the central figure of Christianity.

Luke 1:31

You will conceive and give birth to a son, and you are to call him Jesus.

The angel actually said,

you are to call him Yeshua.

What is the Catholic explanation for translating Jesus's name? Jesus's name should be original because that's what the angel said his name is.

In my native language, we don't say "Juraj Krik". Do you know who is Juraj Krik? No! It's George Bush. Nobody actually knows him under the translated name either. Everyone knows him under his English name.

Why is it ok to translate Jesus's name? Doesn't the translation diminish the authenticity or even the authority of his name? Or what really matter is the person's individual attitude towards the name? Well, from the history we can see that it also matters when it comes to how we use the form, not just the content. We can also see that during exorcisms, I think they mostly use the Latin translation.

Note: Adam & Eve stayed the same almost in all languages. So if Jesus is new Adam, his name should be the same in all languages too.

1
source | link

Does Jesus's name lose authority in other languages? (Catholic)

The proper name Jesus /ˈdʒiːzəs/ used in the English language originates from the Latin form of the Greek name Ἰησοῦς (Iēsous), a rendition of the Hebrew Yeshua (ישוע), also having the variants Joshua or Jeshua. In a religious context, the name refers to Jesus, the central figure of Christianity.

Luke 1:31

You will conceive and give birth to a son, and you are to call him Jesus.

The angel actually said,

you are to call him Yeshua.

What is the Catholic explanation for translating Jesus's name? Jesus's name should be original because that's what the angel said his name is.

In my native language, we don't say "Juraj Krik". Do you know who is Juraj Krik? No! It's George Bush. Nobody actually knows him under the translated name either. Everyone knows him under his English name.

Why is it ok to translate Jesus's name? Doesn't the translation diminish the authenticity or even the authority of his name? Or what really matter is the person's individual attitude towards the name? Well, from the history we can see that it also matters when it comes to how we use the form, not just the content. We can also see that during exorcisms, I think they mostly use the Latin translation.