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With my understanding of Calvinism/Reformed theology, the question here is confused on what the theology actually teaches. My understanding is that you are unconditionally selected for grace, however, once that grace is poured out on you, you freely and willingly surrender to it and follow God. I find this is a common misunderstanding. Common enough that I've had to bring it up twice in other answers 11 22.

With that, I would answer that free choice is part of the process all along, so the question is averted.

However, perhaps you mean sovereignty rather than glory. The question makes more sense if you ask "Why does free will diminish God's sovereignty?" To many Calvinists, free will, defined as total human sovereignty over their own choices, does diminish God's total sovereignty. In Calvinism, nothing happens that God did not decree or make certain. This appears to stand in opposition to free will, where you essentially save yourself, proving that God is not wholly sovereign, and this does, by extension, rob God of the glory he'd normally be due for the power of his saving grace.

What may be particularly illuminating on this issue is the book Calvin vs. Wesley: Bringing Belief in Line with Practice by Don Thorsen. I have not actually read it, but the nuanced differences between these theological fathers can be previewed on Google books, though it does favor Wesleyan theology. Wesley stressed both God's sovereignty and human free will, standing in contrast against Calvin, who seems to stress God's sovereignty and trivialize human free will in his writings. Like you, Wesley saw no reason why free will should threaten God's sovereignty.

However, I'm having trouble finding a Calvinist who argues their theology the way you portray it in your question. Which takes us back to the first part of this answer. Free will is present in Calvinism, however they generally don't want to use the term because of the confusion over what they would mean by it, instead preferring things like "man acts out of necessity, but not coercion" or "libertarian freedom". In Calvinism, you do freely and willingly choose what has been made certain by God's sovereignty.

With my understanding of Calvinism/Reformed theology, the question here is confused on what the theology actually teaches. My understanding is that you are unconditionally selected for grace, however, once that grace is poured out on you, you freely and willingly surrender to it and follow God. I find this is a common misunderstanding. Common enough that I've had to bring it up twice in other answers 1 2.

With that, I would answer that free choice is part of the process all along, so the question is averted.

However, perhaps you mean sovereignty rather than glory. The question makes more sense if you ask "Why does free will diminish God's sovereignty?" To many Calvinists, free will, defined as total human sovereignty over their own choices, does diminish God's total sovereignty. In Calvinism, nothing happens that God did not decree or make certain. This appears to stand in opposition to free will, where you essentially save yourself, proving that God is not wholly sovereign, and this does, by extension, rob God of the glory he'd normally be due for the power of his saving grace.

What may be particularly illuminating on this issue is the book Calvin vs. Wesley: Bringing Belief in Line with Practice by Don Thorsen. I have not actually read it, but the nuanced differences between these theological fathers can be previewed on Google books, though it does favor Wesleyan theology. Wesley stressed both God's sovereignty and human free will, standing in contrast against Calvin, who seems to stress God's sovereignty and trivialize human free will in his writings. Like you, Wesley saw no reason why free will should threaten God's sovereignty.

However, I'm having trouble finding a Calvinist who argues their theology the way you portray it in your question. Which takes us back to the first part of this answer. Free will is present in Calvinism, however they generally don't want to use the term because of the confusion over what they would mean by it, instead preferring things like "man acts out of necessity, but not coercion" or "libertarian freedom". In Calvinism, you do freely and willingly choose what has been made certain by God's sovereignty.

With my understanding of Calvinism/Reformed theology, the question here is confused on what the theology actually teaches. My understanding is that you are unconditionally selected for grace, however, once that grace is poured out on you, you freely and willingly surrender to it and follow God. I find this is a common misunderstanding. Common enough that I've had to bring it up twice in other answers 1 2.

With that, I would answer that free choice is part of the process all along, so the question is averted.

However, perhaps you mean sovereignty rather than glory. The question makes more sense if you ask "Why does free will diminish God's sovereignty?" To many Calvinists, free will, defined as total human sovereignty over their own choices, does diminish God's total sovereignty. In Calvinism, nothing happens that God did not decree or make certain. This appears to stand in opposition to free will, where you essentially save yourself, proving that God is not wholly sovereign, and this does, by extension, rob God of the glory he'd normally be due for the power of his saving grace.

What may be particularly illuminating on this issue is the book Calvin vs. Wesley: Bringing Belief in Line with Practice by Don Thorsen. I have not actually read it, but the nuanced differences between these theological fathers can be previewed on Google books, though it does favor Wesleyan theology. Wesley stressed both God's sovereignty and human free will, standing in contrast against Calvin, who seems to stress God's sovereignty and trivialize human free will in his writings. Like you, Wesley saw no reason why free will should threaten God's sovereignty.

However, I'm having trouble finding a Calvinist who argues their theology the way you portray it in your question. Which takes us back to the first part of this answer. Free will is present in Calvinism, however they generally don't want to use the term because of the confusion over what they would mean by it, instead preferring things like "man acts out of necessity, but not coercion" or "libertarian freedom". In Calvinism, you do freely and willingly choose what has been made certain by God's sovereignty.

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With my understanding of Calvinism/Reformed theology, the question here is confused on what the theology actually teaches. My understanding is that you are unconditionally selected for grace, however, once that grace is poured out on you, you freely and willingly surrender to it and follow God. I find this is a common misunderstanding. Common enough that I've had to bring it up twice in other answers 1 2.

With that, I would answer that free choice is part of the process all along, so the question is averted.

However, perhaps you mean sovereignty rather than glory. The question makes more sense if you ask "Why does free will diminish God's sovereignty?" To many Calvinists, free will, defined as total human sovereignty over their own choices, does diminish God's total sovereignty. In Calvinism, nothing happens that God did not decree or make certain. This appears to stand in opposition to free will, where you essentially save yourself, proving that God is not wholly sovereign, and this does, by extension, rob God of the glory he'd normally be due for the power of his saving grace.

What may be particularly illuminating on this issue is the book Calvin vs. Wesley: Bringing Belief in Line with Practice by Don Thorsen. I have not actually read it, but the nuanced differences between these theological fathers can be previewed on Google books, though it does favor Wesleyan theology. Wesley stressed both God's sovereignty and human free will, standing in contrast against Calvin, who seems to stress God's sovereignty and trivialize human free will in his writings. Like you, Wesley saw no reason why free will should threaten God's sovereignty.

However, I'm having trouble finding a Calvinist who argues their theology the way you portray it in your question. Which takes us back to the first part of this answer. Free will is present in Calvinism, however they generally don't want to use the term because of the confusion over what they would mean by it, instead preferring things like "man acts out of necessity, but not coercion" or "libertarian freedom". In Calvinism, you do freely and willingly choose what has been made certain by God's sovereignty.