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The simplest place to start is that Muslims view Jesus as a man with a special role as prophet. Christians view him andas God himself in the flesh (incarnate). To Muslims, the idea that God had a son is blasphemy. Even though Christians view him as one in the same being (as a person in the Trinity) and thus still hold the idea of God being one, that concept does not compute in the Islamic faith.

Interestingly there is a reference in the Qur'an to Jesus being considered sinless, but the ramifications of this idea are not developed.

Surah 19:19 (Pickthall)
He said: I am only a messenger of thy Lord, that I may bestow on thee a faultless son.

Besides that detail, the rest of the story follows relatively consistently from the key identity issue of being God incarnate or just a man. In Islam, as just a prophet, Jesus plays no role in salvation and it is not accepted that he rose from the dead. Views on whether he was actually crucified vary, but the resurrection is never recognized.

In Christianity, Jesus role is not just that of a prophet (1 Peter 2:22), but also those of a priest and king -- The King: Lord of all creation and Lord of salvation.

Colossians 1:15-20 (ESV)
15 He is the image of jthe invisible God, the firstborn of all creation. 16 For by him all things were created, in heaven and on earth, visible and invisible, whether thrones or dominions or rulers or authorities—all things were created through him and for him. 17 And he is before all things, and in him all things hold together. 18 And he is the head of the body, the church. He is sthe beginning, the firstborn from the dead, that in everything he might be preeminent. 19 For in him all the fullness of God was pleased to dwell, 20 and through him to reconcile to himself all things, whether on earth or in heaven, making peace by the blood of his cross.

The simplest place to start is that Muslims view Jesus as a man with a special role as prophet. Christians view him and God himself in the flesh (incarnate). To Muslims, the idea that God had a son is blasphemy. Even though Christians view him as one in the same being (as a person in the Trinity) and thus still hold the idea of God being one, that concept does not compute in the Islamic faith.

Interestingly there is a reference in the Qur'an to Jesus being considered sinless, but the ramifications of this idea are not developed.

Surah 19:19 (Pickthall)
He said: I am only a messenger of thy Lord, that I may bestow on thee a faultless son.

Besides that detail, the rest of the story follows relatively consistently from the key identity issue of being God incarnate or just a man. In Islam, as just a prophet, Jesus plays no role in salvation and it is not accepted that he rose from the dead. Views on whether he was actually crucified vary, but the resurrection is never recognized.

In Christianity, Jesus role is not just that of a prophet (1 Peter 2:22), but also those of a priest and king -- The King: Lord of all creation and Lord of salvation.

Colossians 1:15-20 (ESV)
15 He is the image of jthe invisible God, the firstborn of all creation. 16 For by him all things were created, in heaven and on earth, visible and invisible, whether thrones or dominions or rulers or authorities—all things were created through him and for him. 17 And he is before all things, and in him all things hold together. 18 And he is the head of the body, the church. He is sthe beginning, the firstborn from the dead, that in everything he might be preeminent. 19 For in him all the fullness of God was pleased to dwell, 20 and through him to reconcile to himself all things, whether on earth or in heaven, making peace by the blood of his cross.

The simplest place to start is that Muslims view Jesus as a man with a special role as prophet. Christians view him as God himself in the flesh (incarnate). To Muslims, the idea that God had a son is blasphemy. Even though Christians view him as one in the same being (as a person in the Trinity) and thus still hold the idea of God being one, that concept does not compute in the Islamic faith.

Interestingly there is a reference in the Qur'an to Jesus being considered sinless, but the ramifications of this idea are not developed.

Surah 19:19 (Pickthall)
He said: I am only a messenger of thy Lord, that I may bestow on thee a faultless son.

Besides that detail, the rest of the story follows relatively consistently from the key identity issue of being God incarnate or just a man. In Islam, as just a prophet, Jesus plays no role in salvation and it is not accepted that he rose from the dead. Views on whether he was actually crucified vary, but the resurrection is never recognized.

In Christianity, Jesus role is not just that of a prophet (1 Peter 2:22), but also those of a priest and king -- The King: Lord of all creation and Lord of salvation.

Colossians 1:15-20 (ESV)
15 He is the image of jthe invisible God, the firstborn of all creation. 16 For by him all things were created, in heaven and on earth, visible and invisible, whether thrones or dominions or rulers or authorities—all things were created through him and for him. 17 And he is before all things, and in him all things hold together. 18 And he is the head of the body, the church. He is sthe beginning, the firstborn from the dead, that in everything he might be preeminent. 19 For in him all the fullness of God was pleased to dwell, 20 and through him to reconcile to himself all things, whether on earth or in heaven, making peace by the blood of his cross.

4 added 6 characters in body
source | link

The simplest place to start is that Muslims view Jesus as a man with a special role as prophet. Christians view him and God himself in the flesh (incarnate). To Muslims, the idea that God had a son is blasphemy. Even though Christians view him as one in the same personbeing (part ofas a person in the Trinity) and thus still hold the idea of God being one, that concept does not compute in the Islamic faith.

Interestingly there is a reference in the Qur'an to Jesus being considered sinless, but the ramifications of this idea are not developed.

Surah 19:19 (Pickthall)
He said: I am only a messenger of thy Lord, that I may bestow on thee a faultless son.

Besides that detail, the rest of the story follows relatively consistently from the key identity issue of being God incarnate or just a man. In Islam, as just a prophet, Jesus plays no role in salvation and it is not accepted that he rose from the dead. Views on whether he was actually crucified vary, but the resurrection is never recognized.

In Christianity, Jesus role is not just that of a prophet (1 Peter 2:22), but also those of a priest and king -- The King: Lord of all creation and Lord of salvation.

Colossians 1:15-20 (ESV)
15 He is the image of jthe invisible God, the firstborn of all creation. 16 For by him all things were created, in heaven and on earth, visible and invisible, whether thrones or dominions or rulers or authorities—all things were created through him and for him. 17 And he is before all things, and in him all things hold together. 18 And he is the head of the body, the church. He is sthe beginning, the firstborn from the dead, that in everything he might be preeminent. 19 For in him all the fullness of God was pleased to dwell, 20 and through him to reconcile to himself all things, whether on earth or in heaven, making peace by the blood of his cross.

The simplest place to start is that Muslims view Jesus as a man with a special role as prophet. Christians view him and God himself in the flesh (incarnate). To Muslims, the idea that God had a son is blasphemy. Even though Christians view him as one in the same person (part of the Trinity) and thus still hold the idea of God being one, that concept does not compute in the Islamic faith.

Interestingly there is a reference in the Qur'an to Jesus being considered sinless, but the ramifications of this idea are not developed.

Surah 19:19 (Pickthall)
He said: I am only a messenger of thy Lord, that I may bestow on thee a faultless son.

Besides that detail, the rest of the story follows relatively consistently from the key identity issue of being God incarnate or just a man. In Islam, as just a prophet, Jesus plays no role in salvation and it is not accepted that he rose from the dead. Views on whether he was actually crucified vary, but the resurrection is never recognized.

In Christianity, Jesus role is not just that of a prophet (1 Peter 2:22), but also those of a priest and king -- The King: Lord of all creation and Lord of salvation.

Colossians 1:15-20 (ESV)
15 He is the image of jthe invisible God, the firstborn of all creation. 16 For by him all things were created, in heaven and on earth, visible and invisible, whether thrones or dominions or rulers or authorities—all things were created through him and for him. 17 And he is before all things, and in him all things hold together. 18 And he is the head of the body, the church. He is sthe beginning, the firstborn from the dead, that in everything he might be preeminent. 19 For in him all the fullness of God was pleased to dwell, 20 and through him to reconcile to himself all things, whether on earth or in heaven, making peace by the blood of his cross.

The simplest place to start is that Muslims view Jesus as a man with a special role as prophet. Christians view him and God himself in the flesh (incarnate). To Muslims, the idea that God had a son is blasphemy. Even though Christians view him as one in the same being (as a person in the Trinity) and thus still hold the idea of God being one, that concept does not compute in the Islamic faith.

Interestingly there is a reference in the Qur'an to Jesus being considered sinless, but the ramifications of this idea are not developed.

Surah 19:19 (Pickthall)
He said: I am only a messenger of thy Lord, that I may bestow on thee a faultless son.

Besides that detail, the rest of the story follows relatively consistently from the key identity issue of being God incarnate or just a man. In Islam, as just a prophet, Jesus plays no role in salvation and it is not accepted that he rose from the dead. Views on whether he was actually crucified vary, but the resurrection is never recognized.

In Christianity, Jesus role is not just that of a prophet (1 Peter 2:22), but also those of a priest and king -- The King: Lord of all creation and Lord of salvation.

Colossians 1:15-20 (ESV)
15 He is the image of jthe invisible God, the firstborn of all creation. 16 For by him all things were created, in heaven and on earth, visible and invisible, whether thrones or dominions or rulers or authorities—all things were created through him and for him. 17 And he is before all things, and in him all things hold together. 18 And he is the head of the body, the church. He is sthe beginning, the firstborn from the dead, that in everything he might be preeminent. 19 For in him all the fullness of God was pleased to dwell, 20 and through him to reconcile to himself all things, whether on earth or in heaven, making peace by the blood of his cross.

3 added 1034 characters in body
source | link

The simplest place to start is that Muslims view Jesus as a man with a special role as prophet. Christians view him and God himself in the flesh (incarnate). To Muslims, the idea that God had a son is blasphemy. Even though Christians view him as one in the same person (part of the Trinity) and thus still hold the idea of God being one, that concept does not compute in the Islamic faith.

Interestingly there is a reference in the Qur'an (Surah 19.19) to Jesus being considered sinless, but the ramifications of this idea are not developed.

Surah 19:19 (Pickthall)
He said: I am only a messenger of thy Lord, that I may bestow on thee a faultless son.

Besides that detail, the rest of the story follows relatively consistently from the key identity issue of being God incarnate or just a man. In Islam, as just a prophet, Jesus plays no role in salvation and it is not accepted that he rose from the dead. Views on whether he was actually crucified vary, but the resurrection is never recognized.

In Christianity, Jesus role is not just that of a prophet (1 Peter 2:22), but also those of a priest and king. The King, -- The King: Lord of all creation and Lord of salvation. (Colossians 1:15-20)

Colossians 1:15-20 (ESV)
15 He is the image of jthe invisible God, the firstborn of all creation. 16 For by him all things were created, in heaven and on earth, visible and invisible, whether thrones or dominions or rulers or authorities—all things were created through him and for him. 17 And he is before all things, and in him all things hold together. 18 And he is the head of the body, the church. He is sthe beginning, the firstborn from the dead, that in everything he might be preeminent. 19 For in him all the fullness of God was pleased to dwell, 20 and through him to reconcile to himself all things, whether on earth or in heaven, making peace by the blood of his cross.

The simplest place to start is that Muslims view Jesus as a man with a special role as prophet. Christians view him and God himself in the flesh (incarnate). To Muslims, the idea that God had a son is blasphemy. Even though Christians view him as one in the same person (part of the Trinity) and thus still hold the idea of God being one, that concept does not compute in the Islamic faith.

Interestingly there is a reference in the Qur'an (Surah 19.19) to Jesus being considered sinless, but the ramifications of this idea are not developed.

Besides that detail, the rest of the story follows relatively consistently from the key identity issue of being God incarnate or just a man. In Islam, as just a prophet, Jesus plays no role in salvation and it is not accepted that he rose from the dead. Views on whether he was actually crucified vary, but the resurrection is never recognized.

In Christianity, Jesus role is not just that of a prophet, but also those of a priest and king. The King, Lord of all creation and Lord of salvation. (Colossians 1:15-20)

The simplest place to start is that Muslims view Jesus as a man with a special role as prophet. Christians view him and God himself in the flesh (incarnate). To Muslims, the idea that God had a son is blasphemy. Even though Christians view him as one in the same person (part of the Trinity) and thus still hold the idea of God being one, that concept does not compute in the Islamic faith.

Interestingly there is a reference in the Qur'an to Jesus being considered sinless, but the ramifications of this idea are not developed.

Surah 19:19 (Pickthall)
He said: I am only a messenger of thy Lord, that I may bestow on thee a faultless son.

Besides that detail, the rest of the story follows relatively consistently from the key identity issue of being God incarnate or just a man. In Islam, as just a prophet, Jesus plays no role in salvation and it is not accepted that he rose from the dead. Views on whether he was actually crucified vary, but the resurrection is never recognized.

In Christianity, Jesus role is not just that of a prophet (1 Peter 2:22), but also those of a priest and king -- The King: Lord of all creation and Lord of salvation.

Colossians 1:15-20 (ESV)
15 He is the image of jthe invisible God, the firstborn of all creation. 16 For by him all things were created, in heaven and on earth, visible and invisible, whether thrones or dominions or rulers or authorities—all things were created through him and for him. 17 And he is before all things, and in him all things hold together. 18 And he is the head of the body, the church. He is sthe beginning, the firstborn from the dead, that in everything he might be preeminent. 19 For in him all the fullness of God was pleased to dwell, 20 and through him to reconcile to himself all things, whether on earth or in heaven, making peace by the blood of his cross.

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