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Predestination means different things to different people. I saw that one answer on here accurately described the difference between single predestination and double predestination. An alternative would come from what you can call the Arminian perspective (rooted from the ideas of Jacobus Arminius who had a different perspective on how salvation works than John Calvin did). If you believe that God is all-knowing, then you accept the fact that God knows our decisions before we do. I also believe that God is all-powerful. IfIf because God is all-knowing, does that mean He put a series of events into motion that eventually caused us to make one decision over another? That is a difficult question to answer because Calvinism and Arminianism both have their problems. It is not necessarily true that because God knows something will happen, He must have caused it. Adam and Eve chose to sin in the garden, but God knew that they would and He created them anyway. The problem that Calvinists face is whether God created sin. How can a perfect and holy God also be the author of sin? On the other hand, those of Arminius' persuasion can lessen God's sovereignty, His all-powerfulness by overemphasizing the human's role in the plan of salvation. The way I view scripture is that God God predestined the way in which humans could come back to Him. Therefore, those that accept Him are "predestined" to be saved. In other words, God chose which people would be saved, those that responded by confessing their sins and believing that Jesus died on the cross for their sins. A basic page to highlight a few of the differences between the two views can be found here: http://so4j.com/calvinism-vs-arminianism-compare http://www.gotquestions.org/Calvinism-vs-Arminianism.html

Predestination means different things to different people. I saw that one answer on here accurately described the difference between single predestination and double predestination. An alternative would come from what you can call the Arminian perspective (rooted from the ideas of Jacobus Arminius who had a different perspective on how salvation works than John Calvin did). If you believe that God is all-knowing, then you accept the fact that God knows our decisions before we do. I also believe that God is all-powerful. If because God is all-knowing, does that mean He put a series of events into motion that eventually caused us to make one decision over another? That is a difficult question to answer because Calvinism and Arminianism both have their problems. It is not necessarily true that because God knows something will happen, He must have caused it. Adam and Eve chose to sin in the garden, but God knew that they would and He created them anyway. The problem that Calvinists face is whether God created sin. How can a perfect and holy God also be the author of sin? On the other hand, those of Arminius' persuasion can lessen God's sovereignty, His all-powerfulness by overemphasizing the human's role in the plan of salvation. The way I view scripture is that God predestined the way in which humans could come back to Him. Therefore, those that accept Him are "predestined" to be saved. In other words, God chose which people would be saved, those that responded by confessing their sins and believing that Jesus died on the cross for their sins. A basic page to highlight a few of the differences between the two views can be found here: http://so4j.com/calvinism-vs-arminianism-compare

Predestination means different things to different people. I saw that one answer on here accurately described the difference between single predestination and double predestination. An alternative would come from what you can call the Arminian perspective (rooted from the ideas of Jacobus Arminius who had a different perspective on how salvation works than John Calvin did). If you believe that God is all-knowing, then you accept the fact that God knows our decisions before we do. If because God is all-knowing, does that mean He put a series of events into motion that eventually caused us to make one decision over another? That is a difficult question to answer because Calvinism and Arminianism both have their problems. It is not necessarily true that because God knows something will happen, He must have caused it. Adam and Eve chose to sin in the garden, but God knew that they would and He created them anyway. The problem that Calvinists face is whether God created sin. How can a perfect and holy God also be the author of sin? On the other hand, those of Arminius' persuasion can lessen God's sovereignty, His all-powerfulness by overemphasizing the human's role in the plan of salvation. God predestined the way in which humans could come back to Him. Therefore, those that accept Him are "predestined" to be saved. In other words, God chose which people would be saved, those that responded by confessing their sins and believing that Jesus died on the cross for their sins. A basic page to highlight a few of the differences between the two views can be found here: http://www.gotquestions.org/Calvinism-vs-Arminianism.html

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Predestination means different things to different people. I saw that one answer on here accurately described the difference between single predestination and double predestination. An alternative would come from what you can call the Arminian perspective (rooted from the ideas of Jacobus Arminius who had a different perspective on how salvation works than John Calvin did). If you believe that God is all-knowing, then you accept the fact that God knows our decisions before we do. I also believe that God is all-powerful. If because God is all-knowing, does that mean He put a series of events into motion that eventually caused us to make one decision over another? That is a difficult question to answer because Calvinism and Arminianism both have their problems. It is not necessarily true that because God knows something will happen, He must have caused it. Adam and Eve chose to sin in the garden, but God knew that they would and He created them anyway. The problem that Calvinists face is whether God created sin. How can a perfect and holy God also be the author of sin? On the other hand, those of Arminius' persuasion can lessen God's sovereignty, His all-powerfulness by overemphasizing the human's role in the plan of salvation. The way I view scripture is that God predestined the way in which humans could come back to Him. Therefore, those that accept Him are "predestined" to be saved. In other words, God chose which people would be saved, those that responded by confessing their sins and believing that Jesus died on the cross for their sins. A basic page to highlight a few of the differences between the two views can be found here: http://so4j.com/calvinism-vs-arminianism-compare