7 replaced http://christianity.stackexchange.com/ with https://christianity.stackexchange.com/
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And so to reconcile with the question and answer pair in the Keenan's Catechism, it's important to note that the pope himself is not infallible: he only has the ability to speak infallibly, and only when he speaks ex cathedra. This doesn't happen all the time: it's a very rare occurrence used only in very specific situations (to date, only about the Marian dogmas mentioned in my answerthe Marian dogmas mentioned in my answer).

As for lists of necessary dogmata, the Catechism of the Catholic Church is the formal collection of what the Church believes. Peter Turner in his answer to the question about the list of teachings considered infalliblehis answer to the question about the list of teachings considered infallible mentioned another great resource, Fundamentals of Catholic Dogma, which summarizes nearly every dogmatic teaching.

And so to reconcile with the question and answer pair in the Keenan's Catechism, it's important to note that the pope himself is not infallible: he only has the ability to speak infallibly, and only when he speaks ex cathedra. This doesn't happen all the time: it's a very rare occurrence used only in very specific situations (to date, only about the Marian dogmas mentioned in my answer).

As for lists of necessary dogmata, the Catechism of the Catholic Church is the formal collection of what the Church believes. Peter Turner in his answer to the question about the list of teachings considered infallible mentioned another great resource, Fundamentals of Catholic Dogma, which summarizes nearly every dogmatic teaching.

And so to reconcile with the question and answer pair in the Keenan's Catechism, it's important to note that the pope himself is not infallible: he only has the ability to speak infallibly, and only when he speaks ex cathedra. This doesn't happen all the time: it's a very rare occurrence used only in very specific situations (to date, only about the Marian dogmas mentioned in my answer).

As for lists of necessary dogmata, the Catechism of the Catholic Church is the formal collection of what the Church believes. Peter Turner in his answer to the question about the list of teachings considered infallible mentioned another great resource, Fundamentals of Catholic Dogma, which summarizes nearly every dogmatic teaching.

6 Arg, more typos. Clarify why the fragment mentioned speaks to Vatican I
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That tisis, the formula of beginning with:

...by the authority of Jesus Christ our Lord, of the Blessed Apostles Peter and Paul, and by our own: we declare, pronounce, and define...

and ending with:

Hence, if anyone shall dare—which God forbid!—to think otherwise than as has been defined by us, let him know and understand that he is condemned by his own judgment; that he has suffered shipwreck in the faith; that he has separated from the unity of the Church...

is meant to invoke the conditions for an ex cathedra teaching:

  1. The Holy Father speaks in his official capacity

    by the authority of Jesus Christ our Lord, of the Blessed Apostles Peter and Paul, and by our own

  2. He speaks definitively

    He speaks definitively

    we declare, pronounce, and define

  3. Anyone who doesn't believe what was taught has left the Church

    Anyone who doesn't believe what was taught has left the Church

    Hence, if anyone shall dare—which God forbid!—to think otherwise than as has been defined by us, let him know and understand that he is condemned by his own judgment; that he has suffered shipwreck in the faith; that he has separated from the unity of the Church

And so to reconcile with the question and answer pair in the Keenan's Catechism, it's important to note that the pope himself is not infallible: he only has the ability to speak infallibly, and only when he speaks ex cathedra. This doesn't happen all the time: it's a very rare occurrence used only in very specific situations (to date, only about the Marian dogmas mentioned in my answer).

That tis, the formula of beginning with:

...by the authority of Jesus Christ our Lord, of the Blessed Apostles Peter and Paul, and by our own: we declare, pronounce, and define...

and ending with:

Hence, if anyone shall dare—which God forbid!—to think otherwise than as has been defined by us, let him know and understand that he is condemned by his own judgment; that he has suffered shipwreck in the faith; that he has separated from the unity of the Church...

is meant to invoke the conditions for an ex cathedra teaching:

  1. The Holy Father speaks in his official capacity
  2. He speaks definitively
  3. Anyone who doesn't believe what was taught has left the Church

And so reconcile with the question and answer pair in the Keenan's Catechism, it's important to note that the pope himself is not infallible: he only has the ability to speak infallibly, and only when he speaks ex cathedra. This doesn't happen all the time: it's a very rare occurrence used only in very specific situations (to date, only about the Marian dogmas mentioned in my answer).

That is, the formula is:

  1. The Holy Father speaks in his official capacity

    by the authority of Jesus Christ our Lord, of the Blessed Apostles Peter and Paul, and by our own

  2. He speaks definitively

    we declare, pronounce, and define

  3. Anyone who doesn't believe what was taught has left the Church

    Hence, if anyone shall dare—which God forbid!—to think otherwise than as has been defined by us, let him know and understand that he is condemned by his own judgment; that he has suffered shipwreck in the faith; that he has separated from the unity of the Church

And so to reconcile with the question and answer pair in the Keenan's Catechism, it's important to note that the pope himself is not infallible: he only has the ability to speak infallibly, and only when he speaks ex cathedra. This doesn't happen all the time: it's a very rare occurrence used only in very specific situations (to date, only about the Marian dogmas mentioned in my answer).

5 Fix some awkward wordings, typos
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The degree to which Roman Catholics need to accept themdoctrines as necessary dogmarequired is directly related to how certain they are known to be true. There is a range of levels of certitude, from immediately revealed truths (fides devinadivina) and the infallible teachings of the Church (fides ecclesiastica) as the most certain to things commonly believed to be true by most theologians (sententia communis) down to things tolerated by the Church but not really well founded (opimoopinio tolerata).

The first two are what generally constitutes necessary dogma: thisthings every person needs to believe in order to be considered in communion with the Church. These are well-known and binding: things like the Apostle's Creed, the Nicene Creed, the primacy of the Pope and the Apostolic succession, and so forth.

Instead, most of the dogma Roman Catholics believe comes directly from the Magisterial teachings of the Church codified in the Catechism. The pope can speak about those infallible teachings, but he speaks about them in a fallible manner (i.e. he can misunderstand or misinterpret them, as he's only human).

The degree to which Roman Catholics need to accept them as necessary dogma is directly related to how certain they are known to be true. There is a range of levels of certitude, from immediately revealed truths (fides devina) and the infallible teachings of the Church (fides ecclesiastica) as the most certain to things commonly believed to be true by most theologians (sententia communis) down to things tolerated by the Church but not really well founded (opimo tolerata).

The first two are what generally constitutes necessary dogma: this every person needs to believe in order to be considered in communion with the Church. These are well-known and binding: things like the Apostle's Creed, the Nicene Creed, the primacy of the Pope and the Apostolic succession, and so forth.

Instead, most of the dogma Roman Catholics believe comes directly from the Magisterial teachings of the Church codified in the Catechism. The pope can speak about those infallible teachings, but he speaks about them in a fallible manner (i.e. he can misunderstand or misinterpret them, as he's only human).

The degree to which Roman Catholics need to accept doctrines as required is directly related to how certain they are known to be true. There is a range of levels of certitude, from immediately revealed truths (fides divina) and the infallible teachings of the Church (fides ecclesiastica) as the most certain to things commonly believed to be true by most theologians (sententia communis) down to things tolerated by the Church but not really well founded (opinio tolerata).

The first two are what generally constitutes necessary dogma: things every person needs to believe in order to be considered in communion with the Church. These are well-known and binding: things like the Apostle's Creed, the Nicene Creed, the primacy of the Pope and the Apostolic succession, and so forth.

Instead, most of the dogma Roman Catholics believe comes directly from the Magisterial teachings of the Church. The pope can speak about those infallible teachings, but he speaks about them in a fallible manner (i.e. he can misunderstand or misinterpret them, as he's only human).

4 deleted 19 characters in body
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3 deleted 19 characters in body
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    Post Undeleted by user72
2 Directly answer the question
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