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The accounts of speaking in tongues in the Bible were always in the context of speaking in a language otherwise unknown to the speaker, but to which there are hearers who understand (on the Day of Pentecost, each member of the crowd heard Peter is his/her own language).

Likewise, when Paul instructs the church in Corinth (1 Cor 14:26), he says to make sure there is an interpreter if one is to speak in a tongue.

Can/does it happen today? I see no reason why it cannot/does not. However, absent the interpreter caveat above, it should have no place in a worship service.

For further note, I cannot find an instance of "tongues" being used in the bible, and not being used in the same way as on the Day of Pentecost.

See Mark 16:17, Acts 10:44-46, 1 Corinthians 12:10, 1 Corinthians 12:30, 1 Corinthians 13:1, 1 Corinthians 14:21-23 (itself referencing Isaiah 28:11).

The accounts of speaking in tongues in the Bible were always in the context of speaking in a language otherwise unknown to the speaker, but to which there are hearers who understand (on the Day of Pentecost, each member of the crowd heard Peter is his/her own language).

Likewise, when Paul instructs the church in Corinth (1 Cor 14:26), he says to make sure there is an interpreter if one is to speak in a tongue.

Can/does it happen today? I see no reason why it cannot/does not. However, absent the interpreter caveat above, it should have no place in a worship service.

The accounts of speaking in tongues in the Bible were always in the context of speaking in a language otherwise unknown to the speaker, but to which there are hearers who understand (on the Day of Pentecost, each member of the crowd heard Peter is his/her own language).

Likewise, when Paul instructs the church in Corinth (1 Cor 14:26), he says to make sure there is an interpreter if one is to speak in a tongue.

Can/does it happen today? I see no reason why it cannot/does not. However, absent the interpreter caveat above, it should have no place in a worship service.

For further note, I cannot find an instance of "tongues" being used in the bible, and not being used in the same way as on the Day of Pentecost.

See Mark 16:17, Acts 10:44-46, 1 Corinthians 12:10, 1 Corinthians 12:30, 1 Corinthians 13:1, 1 Corinthians 14:21-23 (itself referencing Isaiah 28:11).

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The accounts of speaking in tongues in the Bible were always in the context of speaking in a language otherwise unknown to the speaker, but to which there are hearers who understand (on the Day of PentecostDay of Pentecost, each member of the crowd heard Peter is his/her own language).

Likewise, when Paul instructs the church in Corinth (1 Cor 14:26), he says to make sure there is an interpreter if one is to speak in a tongue.

Can/does it happen today? I see no reason why it cannot/does not. However, absent the interpreter caveat above, it should have no place in a worship service.

The accounts of speaking in tongues in the Bible were always in the context of speaking in a language otherwise unknown to the speaker, but to which there are hearers who understand (on the Day of Pentecost, each member of the crowd heard Peter is his/her own language).

Likewise, when Paul instructs the church in Corinth, he says to make sure there is an interpreter if one is to speak in a tongue.

Can/does it happen today? I see no reason why it cannot/does not. However, absent the interpreter caveat above, it should have no place in a worship service.

The accounts of speaking in tongues in the Bible were always in the context of speaking in a language otherwise unknown to the speaker, but to which there are hearers who understand (on the Day of Pentecost, each member of the crowd heard Peter is his/her own language).

Likewise, when Paul instructs the church in Corinth (1 Cor 14:26), he says to make sure there is an interpreter if one is to speak in a tongue.

Can/does it happen today? I see no reason why it cannot/does not. However, absent the interpreter caveat above, it should have no place in a worship service.

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source | link

The accounts of speaking in tongues in the Bible were always in the context of speaking in a language otherwise unknown to the speaker, but to which there are hearers who understand (on the Day of Pentecost, each member of the crowd heard Peter is his/her own language).

Likewise, when Paul instructs the church in Corinth, he says to make sure there is an interpreter if one is to speak in a tongue.

Can/does it happen today? I see no reason why it cannot/does not. However, absent the interpreter caveat above, it should have no place in a worship service.